Height related to pitching


#1

Is it possible to be too tall as a pitcher. We have 2 on my team one a 6’10 senior and one a 6’5" junior. And neither can break 80 mph. They both shot up when they were younger and have become somewhat uncordinated and are just slow all around. Do these kinda guys ever come around?


#2

[quote=“OklahomaLefty”]Is it possible to be too tall as a pitcher. We have 2 on my team one a 6’10 senior and one a 6’5" junior. And neither can break 80 mph. They both shot up when they were younger and have become somewhat uncordinated and are just slow all around. Do these kinda guys ever come around?[/quote]im 6’6, but i’ve been doin a lot of balance work, they have to jus keep throwing


#3

The preferred body type in the big leagues these days is 6’4" and up - tall and lanky. Your kids seem to have gone through growth spurts and they’ve no doubt got some catching up to do with strength and coordination. If the work at it, it will come.

FWIW, Randy Johnson is what 6’8" or 6’10"? He seems to have done pretty well being that tall. Think about how close to home plate your release point would be. :shock:


#4

scouts always discount a short(ish) righty… a smaller lefty gets the benefit of the doubt.


#5

If a pitcher has good mechanics and uses the Nolan Ryan style of “tall and fall”, then height can be a very good thing for speed and downward movement. The key is using gravity to the pitcher’s advantage. A downward plane that starts from a higher point should (at least according to physics) give the ball more acceleration; that downward plane can also make things more difficult for the batter, as the plane for a strike should be a more drastic / radical angle than for, say, a 6-foot pitcher. Not to mention that a taller pitcher should release the ball further out in front of the rubber, thereby shortening the distance of the pitch.

Of course, all these theories are useless without good mechanics. Sounds like these guys just need to get used to their bodies (pitch more!).

As an example, I worked with a kid who experienced a similar growth spurt, going from about 5’9" to 6’5" from HS freshman to senior. He didn’t start pitching until his freshman year of college, and looked very uncoordinated for the first two years. By senior year he was smoother and throwing strikes but only topped out at 83-84. Unfortunately, he didn’t blossom until a year after college, at which point he was throwing around 88-89 MPH.