Heel or Toe?

I would like to know some thoughts on how a pitchers stride foot is to strike the ground. Mainly the thoughts on heel vs. ball of foot. Also tell me the advantedges of either, or the disadvantages.
Thanks
Jeff Hunter

[quote=“Jeff Hunter”]I would like to know some thoughts on how a pitchers stride foot is to strike the ground. Mainly the thoughts on heel vs. ball of foot. Also tell me the advantedges of either, or the disadvantages.
Thanks
Jeff Hunter[/quote]

I try not to land on heel.

doesn’t really matter if your stride allows you to get momentum toward the plate and rotate into squaring up effectively. some guys hit flat, some hit on the ball, some land on the heel and roll to the ball of the foot. what matters most to me is where is your trunk when the foot touches the ground and what do you look like when you release the ball.

I agree with Dusty.

Too often coaches see a pitcher landing on the heel and immediately try to change it. Sometimes landing on the heel is an indication of a lack of momentum and failure to adequately get out over the front leg. In this case, and adjustment is warranted. But note that the fix is with something else - not the foot.

If there are no other issues, then landing on the heel is also a non-issue. In this case, to force a change is “cookie cutter” coaching.

[quote=“Jeff Hunter”]I would like to know some thoughts on how a pitchers stride foot is to strike the ground. Mainly the thoughts on heel vs. ball of foot. Also tell me the advantedges of either, or the disadvantages.
Thanks
Jeff Hunter[/quote]it should be more of a balance, think of this, i dk if it has a real matter in this but it makes some sense, if you jump in the air, is it easier to land on your heel or toes, its all about balance in pitching and if you should be doing anything it would be on your toes, but in my mechanics its more of a balance between the two

[quote=“Roger”]I agree with Dusty.

Too often coaches see a pitcher landing on the heel and immediately try to change it. Sometimes landing on the heel is an indication of a lack of momentum and failure to adequately get out over the front leg. In this case, and adjustment is warranted. But note that the fix is with something else - not the foot.

If there are no other issues, then landing on the heel is also a non-issue. In this case, to force a change is “cookie cutter” coaching.[/quote]roger, dont you think it could cause some timing issues and accually cause a pitcher to lock up their front knee sooner than if they land on the toe or a balance between the two? …

ROGER posted:
If there are no other issues, then landing on the heel is also a non-issue. In this case, to force a change is “cookie cutter” coaching.

There’s more truth to that statement that goes well beyond the question that you asked. In fact, ROGER gave you sincere advice that you can address other issues on.

With respect to your Heel - toe landing question, we all have different sensitivity “feelings” that allow us to engage, or not, perception and timing initiatives with muscle coordination, motor skills, and just plain ole … “yeah, this is just about right!”. On the other hand, some pitchers dictate a heel or toe landing simply because their movement - upright or compressed, forward motion kick starts an unsolicted response to land just that way.

Again, as ROGER pointed out… unless something is seriously wrong, leaving well enough alone is a coaching refinement/talent that is cultivated by experience … not a text book “how to’… one size fits all”.

Coach B.

Randy Johnson credits Tom House with helping him with his wildness and control problems and it all stemmed from Randy landing on his heel which allowed him to spin out of control toward third base. If the pitcher is maintaining control of his body it isn’t much of an issue.

Dusty,
do you teach your kids to land with the front foot at a certain position? I usually stress trying to land at 1:00 o’clock for a right hander to help keep the hips closed longer.

Tdog

Landing on the heel won’t cause a timing issue. Rather, a timing issue (or any of a number of other issues) would cause you to land on your heel. The way I look at it, landing on the heel is a result - not a cause. Build up sufficient momentum, maintain good posture and balance and otherwise have good mehanics and timing and you will probably land of the front half of the foot (or at least flat-footed).

Locking the front knee is also cause by something that happens earlier in the delivery - not by landing on the heel.

Knowing House, he probably got Johnson moving forward sooner and faster and into foot plant quicker. This would leave him with only enough time to get squared up to the target at release. But, remember, Johnson’s low arm slot will still cause him to finished moving toward 3B a bit after his follow-through.