Gyroball/Shuuto

Does anyone have a link a website that teaches how to throw the Gyroball? or the Shuuto? :frowning: :frowning: :frowning: I am very desperate!!!

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=jp-gyro031306&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

have fun

its a pitch that is nasty im pretty sure you use for fingers and i dont kno ive whached a video over and over but its a tuff pitch to master

“Shoot” is a fastball pitch that tails into right-handed batters.
Pedro Martinez
http://f84614980.myweb.hinet.net/Shoot.zip

Keiichi Yabu
http://f84614980.myweb.hinet.net/Shoot2.zip

Gyroball is more like a football slider.
Daisuke Matsuzaka
http://f84614980.myweb.hinet.net/Gyro.zip


Those are really informative pictures…wow

heres a video of the monster , daisuke pitching…the first few are fastballs but i think the breaking pitches are his Gyroball.

and here’s a video of a shuuto. It looks alot like a nasty cutter.
http://media.putfile.com/Shuuto

[quote]“Shoot” is a fastball pitch that tails into right-handed batters.
[/quote]

i always thought that was called a cutter… because i throw a pitch just like that and ive always called it a cutter.

So how do u throw the Shuuto then?

me or in general?

because if ur asking me this is how i throw it :
hold a 2-seam fastball. and then place your right finger on the side of the ball. Then add a little more pressure to that middle finger and throw.Grippin it that was gives it a flat spen rotating towards the batter. it cuts in.

When u say move your right finger are you talking about your middle finger? If so where on the side of the ball do u move it and where is your index finger?

yes your middle finger. About an inch or half an inch from the lace.

To clarify, a cutter when thrown by a right handed pitcher breaks into the hands of a left handed batter, or away from a right handed pitcher. A sinker or 2 seam fastball would be the pitch that comes into righties.

ok so ig uess my pitch is similar to the shuuto. Especially the one Pedro throws

thx guys! Really needed the input!

It came to my attention thats no one really knows how to roll the ball off the fingers and how to twist ur wrist the other way.

after thinking about it i came to the conclusion that your hand should be behind the ball . And right before your release it ( as the ball is rollings off the top of your fingers) your fingers should “slip” over the ball. giving it the bullet rotation and allowing your wrist to cock the other way. I know my descriptions suck. so i have pictures. Its an anime i watch where a kid throws a gyroball(the gyroball throwin in the show doesnt exist but the way they show it done is the same)











i know its not so descriptive but its the best i can do. this should provide you with an idea on how to throw it. I would trying it at lower speeds because i tried this the other day , its extremely difficult to pick this up at high speeds ( i still havent learned it yet)

btw ignore the words.

Matsuzaka… does NOT I repeat, does NOT throw the gyroball. Regardless of what video games say or what some over-hyped fans say.

Someone that my friend and I met at the park while practicing throws the shuuto, we all put on some catching gear to catch it.

The grip as he describes to us is to position a the ball like a 2 seamer, with the horseshoe forming a “U”. Next tape the index finger along the right seam of the horseshoe so the “U” looks like “L”. The middle finger curls up and provides no grip to the ball, but helps hold the ball. The middle finger comes under the ball at the half way point of the other horseshoe. So basically the ball is off center and to the left of the grip.

The wrist is snapped directly down when releasing…

The 6 of us couldn’t get any shuuto-esque movement…
Then again, pitches/grips are not that easy to learn and master.

I remember a pitcher with the Seattle Mariners. His name was Shigetoshi Hasegawa, he was a late-inning reliever—may well have been the closer—and he threw a “shuuto” which, when it was working, looked more like a changeup screwball than anything else. When it wasn’t working. the batters would tee off on it and drive it out of the ballpark and into somebody’s kitchen window, when the roof was open.
From the different descriptions I’ve been reading just about any pitch could be called a “shuuto”—even that devastating cut fastball Mariano Rivera throws all the time. I can understand how it might have gotten that name; a batter who swings and misses that pitch is very likely to say to himself “Oh, shoot!” or perhaps the nastier equivalent. :lol: Incidentally, there’s nothing new about the changeup screwball—the Cincinnati Reds had a pitcher, Joey Jay, who came up with it in 1961 and was using it a lot, and the batters were constantly popping up.

Shuuto is supposed to have 2-seam/sinker action. So basically it’s the Japanese name for a sinker. I think there is some technical/mechanical difference compared to our basic sinker upon release but the movement is the same.

Oh, and Matsuzaka does not throw the gyroball on purpose, but when his slider’s axis of spin is straight instead of tilted down and to the side, it becomes accidentally a gyroball. You can see it on the slow-motion videos of him throwing the slider.

[quote=". a n t o n i o . ."]Shuuto is supposed to have 2-seam/sinker action. So basically it’s the Japanese name for a sinker. I think there is some technical/mechanical difference compared to our basic sinker upon release but the movement is the same.

Oh, and Matsuzaka does not throw the gyroball on purpose, but when his slider’s axis of spin is straight instead of tilted down and to the side, it becomes accidentally a gyroball. You can see it on the slow-motion videos of him throwing the slider.[/quote]

This is exactly correct for both the shuuto and the gyroball. Well said.

Here is video of a real gyroball.

As noted by some, gyroballs do not have any unusal movement at all. They have slider-like spin, but the spin axis is directed exactly along the direction of flight instead of being off-center like a quality slider. Because of that, real gyroballs experience zero Magnus force and so they show no lateral movement (i.e., like a spinning bullet). They also do not experience any more downward break than what is caused by gravity (also like a spinning bullet, where the spin axis is pointed in the same direction as the flight direction).

It is certainly not worth the trouble to learn a pitch that is essentially a very hittable hung slider–and that is what a gyroball is. That’s the real reason that nobody uses this pitch–it was sort of a cool physics idea, but it doesn’t do anything that is really useful for a pitcher. (I’m sure hitters would love to see more gyroballs.)

The 2006 Jeff Passan article-link provided earlier in this thread doesn’t do anything at all to explain what a gyroball is. Worse, it quotes Will Carroll’s completely incorrect fantasies about the gyroball. It has been known for some time now that Carroll got the gyroball story completely wrong.

Flippin, that’s exactly what I—and a lot of major league pitchers—have been saying all along: the “gyroball” does not exist! :stuck_out_tongue:

I wouldn’t call the gyro useless, for a guy in the MLB, typical sinker/slider righty, it could provide a nice jamshot pitch against righties who look for the pitch to break over he plate, kinda like riveras cutter backwards. But it isn’t the miracle pitch…