Gyroball Help Please!

I really need help with my gyroball. I fell like im doing it right, but the spin sometimes looks almost sideways but it is rotating a little more backwards. I cant stop trying to throw it, I am going to keep practicing until I get it right, so can someone tell me in detail how to throw it.

How do you throw the ball first? I have a gyroball spin when I throw.

Well there is two ways, I just dont know if the spin is quite correct. I hold it like a two seamer or four seamer and then I throw it like a football but I pronate my wrist when my hand is like straight up-ish and do all this with my hips and shouloders in sync. The other way is that I do the same grip but throw it like a football and karate chop down when I let go.

by the way, the gyroball isnt a real pitch.

you’re porbably throwing a slider or a slurve

[quote=“4pie”]by the way, the gyroball isnt a real pitch.

you’re porbably throwing a slider or a slurve[/quote]Yea I think it is a pitch, the gyroball has no movement and when i throw there is no movement, so I aint throwing no slider or curve

then its useless. a slider that doesnt break is a hanging slider and is crushed 400+ feet.

I’ve said this before—the “gyroball” doesn’t even exist. It’s a variation of the screwball, and you know what happens if you throw a screwball too much and too often! :roll:

Not necessarily, you often see hanging(or back up) sliders completely fooling hitters because they look for it to break, but it never does. It can be a good pitch to throw if you also throw a good slider or cutter and you’re facing a good hitter that knows what he is doing at the plate. The only pitches that get “crushed 400+ feet” are pitches left up out over the plate.

The gyroball certainly exists. There is an entire book on it written in Japanese. I own it, can throw it, and can teach it. But you are best served throwing other pitches for a wide variety of reasons that I won’t get into right now.

I have to say I agree with Kyleb about it existing, there are videos of it. one in a site referred to in Steven Ellis’ Baseball Pitching Grips book, where the pitch is shown to have the correct spin with the use of a “Gyromaster” a baseball colored so that if it is thrown correctly you ca only see the colored part of the ball. I don’t mean to be disrespectful, and I say this with all due respect, but you guys should look it up before writing it off as not existing.
I am not going to say that it is “unhittable” because I’ve never seen it in action against hitters, but who knows?

Not necessarily, you often see hanging(or back up) sliders completely fooling hitters because they look for it to break, but it never does. It can be a good pitch to throw if you also throw a good slider or cutter and you’re facing a good hitter that knows what he is doing at the plate. The only pitches that get “crushed 400+ feet” are pitches left up out over the plate.[/quote]

The level you are pitching at the batters have not really adjusted to reading breaking pitches all that well. Some of them may know how to look for a red circle or dot on a curveball but many even with knowledge of that don’t execute tracking the ball anyways.

For you it’s useless, because to the batters you’re throwing to it’s basically a hanging curveball. The reason Dice-Gay can use it effectively (well sort of) is because the professional hitters especially at the major league level know what sliders, curveballs, etc. look like and can make the adjustment so the gyro or back-up slider looks like a breaking pitch and is basically the breaking pitche’s equivalent of a change-up.

Yeah, Pustulio—and look what happened to Matsuzaka. He blew out his elbow, tore a lligament, has to have the TJ surgery and will be lost to the Red Sox for the rest of this season and practically all of next. Any pitch that in any way resembles the screwball or is thrown like it is bad news. I remember talking with Ed Lopat one day and he asked me if I ever threw the screwball; I knew how, but I had never tried to throw it, because I knew all too well what happened to Carl Hubbell—he used it so much and so often that when he would stand with his arms at his sides the palm of his left hand faced out; he had literally screwed up his arm! Lopat—who threw it sometimes but more often relied on his other stuff—said to me, "Good for you. You don’t need it."
Now, thinking about it, I do believe that Lopat may have thrown it more like a slider, and that was why he never experienced that kind of arm trouble. The slider delivery is a lot easier on the arm, we all know it—or should—because you don’t even snap your wrist, you just turn it over like a chef flipping a pancake or a crepe (yum). 8)