Grog up!

A leading European university dispatched its archeologist department to an obscure cave in Africa where the oldest known human existence is thought to be found. There in this cave, inscribed on the cave wall, were the following: “GROG UP”.

After countless hours of debate as to exactly what that meant, another carving on the opposite cave wall seem to point to a more deliberate meaning of “GROG UP”.

The game of baseball seems to be one of man’s earliest inventions - along with other inscriptions that read … “DA UMP IS BUM!”

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]A leading European university dispatched its archeologist department to an obscure cave in Africa where the oldest known human existence is thought to be found. There in this cave, inscribed on the cave wall, were the following: “GROG UP”.
After countless hours of debate as to exactly what that meant, another carving on the opposite cave wall seem to point to a more deliberate meaning of “GROG UP”.

The game of baseball seems to be one of man’s earliest inventions - along with other inscriptions that read … “DA UMP IS BUM!”
Coach B.[/quote]

Is this true?
Or are you joking?

Oh, absolutely…
In fact, modern science today has uncovered a wealth of information regarding this sport, that goes back many, many years.

For example, the most early bats were nothing more than a collection of whatever could be ripped off the nearest tree. As this early snapshot shows, early man didn’t have the benefit of the equipment that we use today.

Also, as this early snapshot shows, dugouts weren’t exactly the most roomy or the most comfortable back then either. As this coach is finding, it was very difficult to pass signals to the third base, catcher and other players on the field.

Also, traffic jams and parking spaces were always a thing to contend with. Early Egyptian finds suggested a major backup to their Nile Interstate Cairo-101, every time the Mummy Mud Dogs played the Babylonian Bombers. This early inscription dates back to 1100 B.C. when this rivalry was played to a sellout crowd in King Tut-Ma- “Mummy’s Go Guys” Tutt-n” stadium.

Early umpire training was another thing that left a lot to be desired. The most early records show that the “Spun-Gol-lee” method of developing umpires had its skeptics. However, great leaps forward were made with the advent of the “seedless” technique - or as it was called by many players at the time … “ see- less.”

And of course, wether back then, or today - there will be things that never change. The owners of the game still consider themselves apart from everything else, in addition to making millions of dollars … or back then millions of “nesclrks”. (nice shinny colored rocks)

Yes, yes this game of ours has come a long way… a very long way.

Coach B.