Great in Bullpens Struggle with Strikes in Games

Seems at the beginning of the High School season my son’s strike percentage starts around 65% and decreases with each outing. He keeps track of his strikes when throwing BPs which seems to stay consistent. Any suggestions as to how to translate command to the games. Seems to miss high in games particularly with the FB. From video his mechanics look the same to me. His Rapsodo efficiency last checked in the summer was over 93%. Welcome to all suggestions

ba5083,

“Seems at the beginning of the High School season my son’s strike percentage starts around 65% and decreases with each outing.”

As his confidence goes up, his adrenaline will increase! This has most pitchers striding further than non adrenaline assisted bull pens.

“ Any suggestions as to how to translate command to the games."

"Seems to miss high in games particularly with the FB.”

He should be throwing voluntary high fastballs 50/50 with lower zoned ones when practicing and in competitions! Even if the coach does not call it there. Tell him to stride shorter and stay taller

“From video his mechanics look the same to me.”

Post it here for a more defined answer

“His Rapsodo efficiency last checked in the summer was over 93%.”

Hopefully you did not waste personal money on this device?

efficiency is the worst word they could have used to define spin and axis presentation!

“Welcome to all suggestions”

Again have him stride shorter, stay tall so he can rotate fast and lengthier while also recovering in the best defensive position, 175 degrees of full body rotation ending in a drop step position.

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Could be a little adrenaline rush speeds cup his delivery bit and his top half lags behind. Ball gets released early, especially if high pitches are up and in (to a RHH if RHP)

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Here is the latest video we have from a side view. I have a more recent video from the front view if you think that might help. Initially we thought his lower half might be moving too fast and his arm was late since he was marginally better with a slide step. He started out the 1st couple outings with a 65% S% and is now down to 52% S%. We are now thinking it might be adrenaline as his average velo has jumped from 85 to 86 with his top velo increasing as well. As for the Rapsodo - these were free evaluations done as a couple of the college ID camps he attended this summer. I was unable to find a way to upload the video so I will have to share instead. If you think a front view would be helpful please let me know.

“Here is the latest video we have from a side view.”

It shows he has a traditional drop in and Humeral/Forearm transition to outward length timing.
When his glove side foot plants (benchmark), His Humerus is 40% outwardly rotated, better than most but he is still late in outwards rotation. This means he has to transition his Humerus and Forearm in lengthier double pendulum to be in position to actually target and throw. This happens while the body is passively rotating to start to throw hard but the Humerus is not ready yet.

This fastball was thrown correctly by seeing his Elbow pop up indicating the forearm pronated his drive and recovery, very good.

Watch his head after he plants his glove foot, this is when critical targeting feel and vision occurs.

How does he see past his elevated glove side arm at foot plant, 10 inches less in altitude may help??

Because he uses a full back bend to drive and recover you will notice his head change height and movement jerks towards his glove Pec. This jarring head movement could be a targeting problem?

Because he does not extend hid glove side knee because of his very long stride, he eliminates much rotation and has his head on a dampening shock absorbing action from up towards down instead of a firm exact (extended front knee) base to rotate off of.

“I have a more recent video from the front view if you think that might help.”

This would precisly show if he steps across his field driveline (the imaginary line running from home plate thru the pitchers plate and thru second base), another over rotation to have to recover from.

“Initially we thought his lower half might be moving too fast and his arm was late since he was marginally better with a slide step.”

This has little to do with tempo and all to do with voluntary Humeral/Forearm arrival to full outwards rotational length on time ! Easily fixed, when worked on. I have never seen another pitching coach work on this timing benchmark and why Elbow joint injuries persist.

“ We are now thinking it might be adrenaline as his average velo has jumped from 85 to 86 with his top velo increasing as well.”

As he pitches more and stays healthy he should get faster and faster until he reaches his genetic potential at the end of a competitive adrenaline assisted championship season.

This is how velocity is built, thru underload (5 oz. baseball) healthy reps. If there is any reverses they are injuring themselves from pathomechanical force application. This also takes constantly adjusting thru motor skill targeting bull pens.

“ I was unable to find a way to upload the video so I will have to share instead. If you think a front view would be helpful please let me know. “

YouTube is now the best way to show things because of their newer tools that keep improving.
If you are still curious, why not?

I have witnessed Pitcher who only threw break to one side (curves, sliders and cutters) greatly improve their targeting by adding pitches that break the ball the other way laterally or turning it over, it kind of evens out their releases plus adds voluntarily pronated pitches to their skill set that greatly improves Elbow health.

Nice video. I like his mechanics. The head may come off center a little bit though. I tell our pitchers to put their nose in the catchers glove. What may be happening is when the head goes to the side it becomes harder to stay on top of the ball, staying on top almost becomes unnatural and the fingers stay behind, never getting that last millisecond finger flick that can create velocity and downhill plane… But this doesn’t help with the difference between bullpens and live game. It could be something like the slope of the mound. We also use what’s called “short boxes” where we have the pitcher throw off the mound but move the catcher up about 15 feet to practice getting on top and downhill plane and keep moving catcher back till at normal distance.

Dirtberry is right about one sided breaking balls. Especially when pitcher gets tired they have a tendency to get on the side of their fastballs instead of staying on top. To correct this during a game we teach them to throw something (probably a changeup) to get their fingers and release back to normal. So if they are missing outside we will call for a pitch that makes them keep their fingers on the inside of the ball, and vice versa.

I’m curious how time affects this. My son has a slightly uphill swing, but I think his timing is not right, resulting in pops up. Meaning he got on the plane with the ball, but it was too late. Does that result in pop-ups? Does that make sense?

Sorry for the delay in responding. For some reason I have not be notified of any responses thinking this post was lost in cyber.

it shows he has a traditional drop in and Humeral/Forearm transition to outward length timing.
When his glove side foot plants (benchmark) , His Humerus is 40% outwardly rotated, better than most but he is still late in outwards rotation. This means he has to transition his Humerus and Forearm in lengthier double pendulum to be in position to actually target and throw. This happens while the body is passively rotating to start to throw hard but the Humerus is not ready yet.

I apologize for not following regarding your 1st paragraph - particularly “in lengthier double pendulum.” Since I’m not sure what you are referencing could your suggestions possibly be skewed due to camera angle or scap pinching?

he does not extend his glove side knee because of his very long stride, he eliminates much rotation and has his head on a dampening shock absorbing action from up towards down instead of a firm exact (extended front knee) base to rotate off of.

Something he has been working on since a biomechanics evaluation at ASMI from last fall. Seems to me (which I could be wrong) part of this issue can be cleaned up with a little more hip/pelvis rotation. When he concentrates on get his plant leg straight it seems his body comes over the top causing high pitches. His HS pitching coach has suggested more hip rotation or concentrate on throwing this glove side hip at foot strike to try and create more hip rotation while leave shoulders behind.

This has little to do with tempo and all to do with voluntary Humeral/Forearm arrival to full outwards rotational length on time ! Easily fixed, when worked on. I have never seen another pitching coach work on this timing benchmark and why Elbow joint injuries persist.

Do you have any possible specific drills to help with this?

Since the initial post his S% has increased to around 58-60% just by concentrating on finishing his delivery. Has also resulted in a bump in velo to an average of 86-87 with touching 90 occasionally (based off teams radar). Not sure if that is a result of finishing better or later in the HS season along with welcomed warmer weather.

Is this a reference that his forearm needs to be more vertical and front foot strike? And the double pendulum reference is that his forearm still has to go back before going forward at the wrong time?

The best shots in the MLB aren’t just hitting the ball. It’s about power, precision, and timing. There are many reasons why a player can become a good hitter. It could be because of their stance, or it could be that they have more power than other players.