Good or Not?

Is is healthy or “OK” to pitch in one game, 2 in or so. Then get all cold and you have another game (Double Header) and pitch in that one too.

The coach wanted me to do that.

But our first game was at 11 am and was done at about 1 pm.

Then I went on to play with another team. 3 pm. And they wanted to make me pitch, Just in relief. but my arm was feeling a little sore

It’s not “bad,” but if you are feeling sore or fatigued, you definitely should not. Pitchers injure themselves when they throw while fatigued - that’s why pitch counts aren’t necessarily good indicators of how taxing a game was. A pitcher who throws 130 pitches over 9 innings is going to be a lot less tired than a pitcher who throws 90 pitches over 4 innings.

Why would that be? the pitcher throwing 90 pitches over 4 in, is on pace to throwing 130 pitches in 9

Why would that be? the pitcher throwing 90 pitches over 4 in, is on pace to throwing 130 pitches in 9[/quote]

Might want to check those math skills, kingnavarro.

90 pitchers in 4 innings would set the pitcher on pace for 202 pitches over 9 innings, not 130.

The rest in between innings gives time for your arm to recover, adding less tress… = Not as tired

Oh! I thought he was talking about 7 innings not 9

It doesn’t work that way.
Take two pitchers, both (say) righthanded with similar styles. One throws 70 pitches over a span of 4 innings—I’ve seen this more than once—and by the time he gets to six innings he’s had it. The other throws 70 pitches over a span of 7 or 8 innings—and because he’s been economical with his pitches he has a very good chance of pitching a complete game. I remember Ed Lopat—my old pitching coach—who, more often than not, used just 85 or 90 pitches to throw a complete game because he didn’t waste any pitches. More recently Mike Mussina would do the same thing. A lot of it has to do with control and command, the ability to put your pitches where you want them to go, and no wasted effort in the process. Even C.C. Sabathia—a real power pitcher—who might throw 120 pitches in a game, will often pitch a complete game because he conserved his energy. 8)

[quote=“Zita Carno”]It doesn’t work that way.
Take two pitchers, both (say) righthanded with similar styles. One throws 70 pitches over a span of 4 innings—I’ve seen this more than once—and by the time he gets to six innings he’s had it. The other throws 70 pitches over a span of 7 or 8 innings—and because he’s been economical with his pitches he has a very good chance of pitching a complete game. I remember Ed Lopat—my old pitching coach—who, more often than not, used just 85 or 90 pitches to throw a complete game because he didn’t waste any pitches. More recently Mike Mussina would do the same thing. A lot of it has to do with control and command, the ability to put your pitches where you want them to go, and no wasted effort in the process. Even C.C. Sabathia—a real power pitcher—who might throw 120 pitches in a game, will often pitch a complete game because he conserved his energy. 8)[/quote]

So only if you relieved a game the first game you can pitch again the 2nd in a DH?
Because that would be non sense to have CC throw 120 in 9 and then pitch again in the 2nd game of the DH

I wouldn’t advise that.
We don’t have many doubleheaders these days, not unless one game is to make up for a rainout. Unless you threw just one pitch in the ninth inning of the first game to retire the side, forget about pitching the second game of the twin bill and take a couple of days to give the arm the rest it needs. Time was…when, in the early days of the game, pitchers would throw both ends of a doubleheader—but not any more. The game has changed, and pitchers’ arms have changed, and their needs have changed. So, if you’ve relieved in the first game of a doubleheader and have pitched, say, two innings, go home, have a good dinner, watch some stupid movie on TV, get the rest you need so you can get out there and pitch a couple of days later. One thing you don’t want to do is throw that arm out. 8)

Okay I gotcha.