Game Pitches-Feed back please

I noticed the following:

-better leg drive
-stay closed longer
-arm up and continuous
-better shoulder/hip separation
-better hip/shoulder turn, more explosive.

Let me know what you think. Thanks!

Jimbo,

I think you have improved in several areas from your earlier videos. Here are a few things that I see that need some work:

1- your front foot is opening early causing your knee and hip to open early.

2- Look at your back foot at front foot strike!!! Your back foot starts to rotate AFTER front foot strike. What should be happening is that your BACK foot pushes off the rubber and launches you into front foot strike which creates a longer stride and more explosive delivery. Look at the back foot again! It is still on the rubber at front foot strike. If you can be more explosive and push off the rubber you would have alot of untapped MPH in your delivery.

3- Still not seeing alot of external rotation. There is more of a whipping effect here.

4- You need to thrust your chest out over your plant leg. You seem to be slowing yourself down and finishing way too upright. Getting your chest out may help your external roation as well.

good luck

Thanks for the feedback, I see what you’re saying and I agree.

Jimster,

To be honest, I think that you’ve regressed a bit. Your lower body may have improved but that arm action that you had a few weeks ago hasn’t translated to the mound. I think you need to go back to working on the stuff that Nyman told you about. That, above anything, will help you tremendously.

If I am interpreting Nyman’s work correctly you are currently a pusher. While you can throw hard as a pusher (Barry Zito is considered a pusher and throws about 85), you more than likely never get to 90. My advice would be to keep working on keep the arm loose and not worrying about slot. When you get that down, then you can work on lower body.

Priceless

Let me tell you about what I used to do in my young days. I went to Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark) every chance I got, and I would sit in the stands and watch the pitchers, particularly the Big Three of the rotation. I noticed that they were all doing the same thing; they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were generating the power behind their pitches. In doing this they were taking a lot of pressure off the shoulder and there was a flow of energy all the way from the bottom end all the way through the shoulder and arm to the fingertips, so it seemed that shoulder and arm were just going along for the ride. They were throwing harder with less effort—even Eddie Lopat, who was by no means a fireballer.
I saw this, and I made a note of it and started working on this on my own. As I practiced this essential aspect of good mechanics I found that I was doing exactly what those pitchers were doing—throwing harder with less effort, even without being a rip-roarin’ fireballer, and my natural sidearm delivery had more snap to it. It was such a great feeling. And I was able to use my crossfire more effectively. Later on, when Lopat, who had become my de facto pitching coach, noticed this he couldn’t help smiling. I liked that. 8) :slight_smile:

Let me tell you about what I used to do in my young days. I went to Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark) every chance I got, and I would sit in the stands and watch the pitchers, particularly the Big Three of the rotation. I noticed that they were all doing the same thing; they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were generating the power behind their pitches. In doing this they were taking a lot of pressure off the shoulder and the arm;
We all could learn a lot from watching 8) there was a flow of energy all the way from the bottom end all the way through the shoulder and arm to the fingertips, so it seemed that shoulder and arm were just going along for the ride. They were throwing harder with less effort—even Eddie Lopat, who was by no means a fireballer.
I saw this, and I made a note of it and started working on this on my own. As I practiced this essential aspect of good mechanics I found that I was doing exactly what those pitchers were doing—throwing harder with less effort, even without being a rip-roarin’ fireballer, and my natural sidearm delivery had more snap to it. It was such a great feeling. And I was able to use my crossfire more effectively. Later on, when Lopat, who had become my de facto pitching coach, noticed this he couldn’t help smiling. I liked that. 8) :slight_smile:

STUPID COMPUTER! There it goes, repeating itself. :lol:

Your starting to throw before your front foot hits, from what I can see at least. Thats gonna make you open early and get that hitch in your arm action. Focus on keeping that front side strong and not letting it pull back, instead go to it, thats gonna get your chest to your target and help prevent head movement. When you keep yourself from throwing until the front foot hits you’ll land with hips open (So both feet will be pointing forward) but your front side will still up and you’ll stay closed giving you a tremendous amount of energy that you generate throwing getting your chest to target. You can feel it just by getting into the position that you think you should be in when your front foot hits the ground and just hold that position feel it, how to get there, feel that built up energy you can release. This video explains a lot of this stuff

Nolan Ryan talks about it a lot in this video, its kinda long but its worth it I think. Tom house is in it as well.