Gaining weight question


#1

Is there anyway to gain weight while also losing body fat? I’m currently around 6 foot and weight about 185 lbs, I am around 20% body fat. I want to be at 200 lbs within a year, but I also want to be at 12% body fat. Should I focus on first burning fat, then gain pounds. Or should I focus on gaining muscle and then lose the fat? Any advice is appreciated


#2

No, you have to increase your calories to gain weight and you have to decrease calories to burn fat. What I recommend you do is get your body fat down to 12% then gain the weight. The only problem with gaining the weight is you wont gain all muscle so your body fat will go right back if you try to get up to 200lbs. You kind of have to work back and forth between burning fat and then gaining weight, it takes a lot of time and a lot of food.


#3

Diet will play a big part in what you want to do. Without knowing anything about your current diet my suggestion is to focus on gaining strength not weight- preferably strength as it relates to pitching. If you focus on gaining weight through food you will likely gain mostly fat. If you focus on losing fat you will likely lose muscle mass as well.

If you focus on gaining strength you may not gain much weight initially but your body composition will likely change. Good nutrition (watch the carbs- excess gets stored mainly as fat) and proper workouts with good recovery will determine if you reach your weight goal which should really be secondary to gaining strength.


#4

It’s easier to gain weight then shed body fat rather than the other way around.

You can gain weight while losing body fat if you’re a rank novice in exercise training and you go very slowly. But the general answer to your question is “No, not really.”


#5

Absolutely you can gain weight and lose body fat–a good training program will do both.

Adding muscle will add weight.


#6

It’s possible but only for the really fat people and rank novices. It’s not realistic for people who are intermediate lifters.


#7

It’s possible but only for the really fat people and rank novices. It’s not realistic for people who are intermediate lifters.[/quote]

I don’t know, I feel like I see this all the time, especially with players coming off a long season. At the very least, weight should be able to be maintained while losing fat.


#8

I have to respectfully disagree with ZW on this.

It is next to impossible to gain weight without gaining body fat. Your diet and calorie intake has to be 100% perfect to achieve this goal. Most typical high school or college athlete does not have the tools, discipline or know how to do this correctly.

To gain weight (even good muscle weight) you have consume a lot of calories. Much more calories than you are burning. If you have a good weight program and are consuming plenty of calories, you will build both muscle and add some fat. Once you have achieved your desired weight, it is far easier to maintain your strength and muscle as you trim body fat. So…don’t be afraid to gain a little body fat as you are gaining muscle. Then, you can use the “fat” as fuel to be turned into even more muscle.

Finally, I do agree with JP - focus on gaining “strength” over weight and make sure your diet is as spot on as possible. There is a lot that goes into a good athlete’s diet. I recommend speaking with a professional about your fitness goals and make sure your diet is in line with these ideals.


#9

for some (meaning myself) it is possible to gain weight without adding bodyfat, it just takes a little longer because you both have to overeat while also making sure everything that you are eating is clean.

I have managed to go from 160lbs about two years ago to 174 lbs this summer to about 196lbs currently all without gaining any noticeable amounts of bodyfat.

to do this though, probably requires certain genetics, and an obsessiveness that many would, ironically, call unhealthy.

I take crap all the time from my friends for not drinking soda or touching fast food when they go to mcdonalds, or for bringing a jar of nuts or peanut butter to a friend’s house when spending the night because I know they would only have brownies or easymac to snack on late at night.

But saying that it’s impossible to gain weight without adding fat too is a little misleading, given my experience. I guess it all depends on the individual.


#10

160 to 196 in two years for a youth athlete is totally possible without gaining much fat. Two years is a very long time and that’s not much weight per month, so it’s definitely possible to recomp with small gains the whole way.

My comments were more pointed at the people who want to gain 30 pounds in 3 months. It just ain’t happening without a decent portion of bodyfat (which you can diet off later).


#11

[quote=“kyleb”]160 to 196 in two years for a youth athlete is totally possible without gaining much fat. Two years is a very long time and that’s not much weight per month, so it’s definitely possible to recomp with small gains the whole way.

My comments were more pointed at the people who want to gain 30 pounds in 3 months. It just ain’t happening without a decent portion of bodyfat (which you can diet off later).[/quote]

well 22lbs of that happened over a 6 month period, and 11 of those 22 lbs were in a focused 7 week period, still with no noticeable gains in bodyfat.

but yeah, nobody is going to gain 30 lbs of muscle in 3 months. 6, maybe, if you’re doing everything right.


#12

I think that age and maturity will play a role also here guys. Gaining that weight like Lanky as a 17 year old, is a heckuva lot different than somebody that may be 27.


#13

Absolutely. Individual metabolic rates and hormonal milieu will make a serious difference here.


#14

And of course… all of this is irrelevant if we are just interested in gaining weight without gaining functional strength. Every athlete needs to be concerned with his training habits and diet is equally as important. The two go hand in hand.

But the bottom line is young athletes will naturally mature and gain weight easier as they get stronger. The focus should be on gaining functional strength and, with the proper diet, the weight gain should come as a good side effect


#15

“Functional” can be taken way too far. All novices need to build general strength, as it has high carryover to sport-specific activities. This involves basic barbell and dumbbell movements where you move heavy weight with lots of musculature - i.e. compound lifts.


#16

I agree completely…my point was simply to focus on workouts that make you stronger (and functional) instead of just gaining weight…

For those who may not know… compound exercises (other wise known as multi-joint or chain exercises) are lifts that involve multiple body parts working together. For example, squats, deadlifts, hang cleans, burpees, lunge twists, step ups and similar exercises. The more body movement you can involve in a single exercise the better.

On the contrary, singular exercises like bicep curls, leg exestension, tricep extensions, and their very limited cousins are much less helpful from an athletes standpoint