Gaining Pitching velocity


#1

I’m a 15 year old pitcher. I don’t know exactly how hard I throw but people have told me they think it’s somewhere in the mid 70s area. I consider myself a good pitcher, I have a nasty 2 seam, solid curve and change, and I can throw any pitch I want in any count for a strike, also I can command both halves of the plate. My issue is velocity, I didn’t make the high school team as a freshman last season because the coach told me I wasn’t throwing hard enough(I have gained some velocity since then but I don’t think it’s enough yet.) I’ve been doing body weight excercises and arm band excercises everyday to train, but I don’t know how effective that has been. My parents are hesitant about letting me lift weights because they say they’re harmful to your growth. Does anyone have some advice to help me gain velocity? I don’t know how realistic this is but I’d like to be hitting upper 70s and maybe touch 80 by the fall tryout. Thank you


#2

Are you a rising Freshman or Sophomore? Mid 70’s with good command and control is normally good enough to make most HS teams. Might want to repost in general section for more responses, I had a hard time finding your post.


#3

I’m going to be a sophomore. And I live in Florida so it’s pretty intense down here, we have a few kids in my same grade who can throw mid to upper 80s


#4

Well, there are several things you can do, and yeah if you want to gain around 10 mph it is totally reasonable, but it might take some time and determination. I would suggest you to work on your mechanics; maybe you have a couple of miles per hour in you, but you aren’t taking a long enough stride or something like that. If not, then I would suggest to throw everyday and eventually you will get more accurate and faster. Maybe hit the gym sometime to increase arm strength as well. Other than that, all you need is confidence and you can do it! XD


#5

Got any video


#6

I know I hit the guy but it’s the only video I had.

#7

Something much closer would be helpful, bullpens would be fine but it’s difficult to see much on this one.


#8

Kev11_79

Just a quick look and I can see where you are leaving a lot of velocity on the table.

  1. Little to no forward momentum at leg lift
  2. More importantly, You collapse your back leg. The angle of your shin places your knee way over the front of your pitching foot toe. Clean up the back leg, sit into your delivery correctly, and start moving down the mound more explosively instead of sitting on your back leg and you should see an increase in velocity.

Take a look at the pic of your shin. See how it pushes your knee way over the front of your foot.
Hope this helps

Steve

LTP%20Knee%20Collapse%20Over%20Foot


#9

Thanks for the advice. I got clocked today on a flat mound at 70mph. I don’t know how much effect that had on the velocity, but regardless it was a pretty disappointing speed. How can I fix those mechanical erros and also what other things can I do to increase my velocity. I need to be throwing 75 to make the team and I’m no where near that. Thank you


#10

Kev11_79

If you were throwing from the outfield you wouldn’t collapse your back leg and open up the front leg early. Your brain would tell your body to use the ground force and push off hard to generate explosive forward momentum to reach your target in the infield without you ever having to think about it. This is the type of mentality you have to have on the mound. Move explosively down the mound!!

A drill I would suggest for getting the body to move explosively down the mound is step behinds. With step behinds, your brain will tell the rest of your body that you want to move quickly to perform the throw. Video yourself from the side doing your step behinds and start incorporating that movement and intent into your delivery. There are other drills similar to the step behinds that don’t incorporate the explosive movement that are just as good. The reason for the step behinds is so you can feel the movement.

Steve

Step Behinds


#11

Check out youtube for core strengthening exercises. And you also need to get into a long toss regimen. You just need to find some resources to develop a good plan otherwise it will be counterproductive.


#12

Look into Driveline or Tread Athletics. They specialize in having their pitchers throw harder


#13

kev11-79,

I’m a 15 year old pitcher”

This means you are biologically 13,14,15,16 or 17 years old. this is the only criteria you need to know to evaluate where you are at and when you can start to increase training aggressiveness and oppertunities.

Are you a delayed, equated or advanced in maturity?

“I don’t know exactly how hard I throw but people have told me they think it’s somewhere in the mid 70s area.”

Not bad you are actually higher than the average.

“I consider myself a good pitcher”

Define this? It could mean you throw strikes, you have command of 3 pitch types or most important you know how to perform and understand healthy mechanics.
None of these have anything to do with high velocity.

“I have a nasty 2 seam”

These have lateral movement. Are you aware of why a 2 seam laterally moves or are you like most others who can not get the same movement direction from a 4 seamer, voluntarily?

“solid curve”

Meaning it breaks a lot and i can throw it for strikes.
The problem here is it is most likely a traditional intuitively forearm supinated pitch type that is destroying your elbow in many ways and by not understanding this allows other pitch types to also be thrown intuitively with this approach.

“ My issue is velocity,”

It’s every bodies issue, even the ones with it
If you are biologically delayed your average velocity will line up better with that group

“I didn’t make the high school team as a freshman last season because the coach told me I wasn’t throwing hard enough”

Were you allowed to scrimmage? This is where most fail the coach.

“I’ve been doing body weight exercises and arm band excercises everyday to train”

None of these are velocity gainers! Only fitness attainers.

“I don’t know how effective that has been.”

These will help bullet proof you against soft tissue damage. They will not bring velocity to you!

“My parents are hesitant about letting me lift weights because they say they’re harmful to your growth.”

Then why do they let you pitch ballistically?
I’d like to see the look on their face’s if they saw x-rays of both your elbows in comparison.

There is solid proof that ballistic pitching with the traditional Centripedal pitching approach deforms the growth process greatly in the ball side elbow.

Weight lifting can begin vigorously when your elbow growth plates mature completely at biologically aged 16 with equated maturers. If you are advanced by 1 year, you can start!

It’s a 2 edged sword, if you over train aggressively to early, growth is perturbed but if you do not tax your body daily moderately you do not become robust and fit for your age.

Do it, just don’t over do it the way youth pitching is allocated.

Does anyone have some advice to help me gain velocity?

Here is how I get velo out of youth pitchers.

First they must learn that relaxation early is key to explosiveness later and that there is 2 Kinetic chains involved here. The first is the lengthening kinetic chain where the body is trying to find length smoothly and precisely with glove side foot plant (lengthening Kinetic chain) timing with the Humerus and forearm outwards rotation simultaneously. this can only happen with an effortless looking drop in.

Most coaches believe velocity comes from down the hill momentum when this has proven to be false scientifically (Kinesiological field) a long time ago. Remember the first kinetic chain only lengthens you.

When you achieve full rotational length of your Humerus is when any muscle contraction used to forwardly project the ball starts the 2nd kinetic chain (shortening kinetic chain) . any contractions you create up until then are considered lengthening processes and no velocity is plotted yet.

Now you can start you shortening kinetic chain where all your emphasis should be pointed if velocity is your goal.

velocity check list:

#1. Put both the index finger and middle fingers together for all fastball types. Make 2 fingers into 1.

#2. Take the ball back by rotating your Humerus and forearm (supinating) in outwards rotation so your hand arrives at the back in line with the field driveline ( an imaginary line running between the target and opposite of the target thru the center of the mound ) and ball at top of head ( driveline height ) high with a slightly bend elbow.

#3 Stride only the distance of a light trot so you can then use your glove leg to pull rotation against the ground.

#4 Stay tall from the beginning of the drop in all the way thru release and recovery so you can form an axis with your glove leg off which to rotate from and recover with 180 degrees of body rotation. This will allow for greater rotational drive length while shortening is occurring ramping up the velocity.

#5 pronate snap all your fastballs and off speed voluntarily, this is the only way to withstand the greater stresses you are now going to produce.

#6 Always practice and compete at maximal effort when performing ballistic activities.

#7 Healthy pitch types will eliminate any mental (subconcious or physical ) dampening of your effort.

#8 And most important always know you (pitcher) are the initiator and he is the (batter) responder making your fastball look faster because you have other pitches that move laterally and at different speeds.

Try these things as a test? I always get immediate velo increases and better lateral movements.

MLB is going this direction secretively, you might as well have the same info.

“I don’t know how realistic this is but I’d like to be hitting upper 70s and maybe touch 80 by the fall tryout.”

You do realize the HS varsity national average is still in the low 80’s don’t you?


#14

Hi, I’m a 16 year old going into my junior year of high school and my fastball sits 79-82 and I top 83. I’m only 6”1, 200 lbs (I know that may be big for some people, but everyone in my family’s is 6”4 and above.) I haven’t hit my growth spurt yet. If I grow to around 6”4 or 6”5, and lift a lot, I could get my fastball into the high 80’s maybe even low 90’s by senior year/freshman year of college. (And I do have a couple small d3 offers cause they know I have room fitness growth and a lot of potential). I would like to be able to play at a d1 school. How hard wouldn’t I have to throw? I know location and have good other pitches may be even more important but I’m focusing inn veloicty now.