Gaining Pitching velocity


#1

I’m a 15 year old pitcher. I don’t know exactly how hard I throw but people have told me they think it’s somewhere in the mid 70s area. I consider myself a good pitcher, I have a nasty 2 seam, solid curve and change, and I can throw any pitch I want in any count for a strike, also I can command both halves of the plate. My issue is velocity, I didn’t make the high school team as a freshman last season because the coach told me I wasn’t throwing hard enough(I have gained some velocity since then but I don’t think it’s enough yet.) I’ve been doing body weight excercises and arm band excercises everyday to train, but I don’t know how effective that has been. My parents are hesitant about letting me lift weights because they say they’re harmful to your growth. Does anyone have some advice to help me gain velocity? I don’t know how realistic this is but I’d like to be hitting upper 70s and maybe touch 80 by the fall tryout. Thank you


#2

Are you a rising Freshman or Sophomore? Mid 70’s with good command and control is normally good enough to make most HS teams. Might want to repost in general section for more responses, I had a hard time finding your post.


#3

I’m going to be a sophomore. And I live in Florida so it’s pretty intense down here, we have a few kids in my same grade who can throw mid to upper 80s


#4

Well, there are several things you can do, and yeah if you want to gain around 10 mph it is totally reasonable, but it might take some time and determination. I would suggest you to work on your mechanics; maybe you have a couple of miles per hour in you, but you aren’t taking a long enough stride or something like that. If not, then I would suggest to throw everyday and eventually you will get more accurate and faster. Maybe hit the gym sometime to increase arm strength as well. Other than that, all you need is confidence and you can do it! XD


#5

Got any video


#6

I know I hit the guy but it’s the only video I had.

#7

Something much closer would be helpful, bullpens would be fine but it’s difficult to see much on this one.


#8

Kev11_79

Just a quick look and I can see where you are leaving a lot of velocity on the table.

  1. Little to no forward momentum at leg lift
  2. More importantly, You collapse your back leg. The angle of your shin places your knee way over the front of your pitching foot toe. Clean up the back leg, sit into your delivery correctly, and start moving down the mound more explosively instead of sitting on your back leg and you should see an increase in velocity.

Take a look at the pic of your shin. See how it pushes your knee way over the front of your foot.
Hope this helps

Steve

LTP%20Knee%20Collapse%20Over%20Foot


#9

Thanks for the advice. I got clocked today on a flat mound at 70mph. I don’t know how much effect that had on the velocity, but regardless it was a pretty disappointing speed. How can I fix those mechanical erros and also what other things can I do to increase my velocity. I need to be throwing 75 to make the team and I’m no where near that. Thank you


#10

Kev11_79

If you were throwing from the outfield you wouldn’t collapse your back leg and open up the front leg early. Your brain would tell your body to use the ground force and push off hard to generate explosive forward momentum to reach your target in the infield without you ever having to think about it. This is the type of mentality you have to have on the mound. Move explosively down the mound!!

A drill I would suggest for getting the body to move explosively down the mound is step behinds. With step behinds, your brain will tell the rest of your body that you want to move quickly to perform the throw. Video yourself from the side doing your step behinds and start incorporating that movement and intent into your delivery. There are other drills similar to the step behinds that don’t incorporate the explosive movement that are just as good. The reason for the step behinds is so you can feel the movement.

Steve

Step Behinds