Gaining good weight

I never thought that I would ever have to ask a question about gaining weight but since last spring I’ve dropped 40lbs (200-160) and I would like to throw on some good weight with out adding fat to my mid section because I’ve found that being thinner in my mid section allows me to rotate faster when I’m pitching. But I also know a college coach would like to see a kid a little bigger than 5’11 160.

Because I work out in the evening I’ve always avoided eating afterwards because of the old taboo about eating late at night and getting fat, I’ve read that this isn’t true if you eat the right foods so I was hoping that someone could possibly give me a good late night post workout meal that wouldn’t make me get fat. I already consume six meals a day and eat a lot of protein and plan my meals using the glycemic index so could someone please help me out here.

I know there have been similar posts but known of them really deal with a post workout meal late at night. I would really appreciate any information.

i like to throw a piece of boneless chicken breast on the stove and cook it through then slap on a piece of american or cheddar cheese and let it melt on.

then drink a tall glass of chocolate milk 1%. Milk is a great source of protein.

You should also look into eating some cottage cheese. Looks gross but is one of the best things to eat post workout.

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]i like to throw a piece of boneless chicken breast on the stove and cook it through then slap on a piece of american or cheddar cheese and let it melt on.

then drink a tall glass of chocolate milk 1%. Milk is a great source of protein.

You should also look into eating some cottage cheese. Looks gross but is one of the best things to eat post workout.[/quote]

I like cottage cheese I take casein protein before I go to sleep because it does the same thing cottage cheese does. I may look into a can of tuna one a piece of wheat bread even though that will put me up to 2 cans of tuna a day and I can barley handle 1.

Personal Opinion: Salmon is better than tuna. Not only in taste but in a few nutritional areas. Also, tuna are slowing creeping towards extinction, give them a break :wink:

Yes I also like the taste of salmon but the price is a little high for me, my parents pay for the groceries but I’m already running up a pretty good bill with the chicken and all the other lean meets I eat, I’ve also noticed peppers are extremely expensive and I usually eat a lot of them. Eating right is kind of expensive but it’s worth it.

You are absolutely correct that eating healthy is somewhat expensive but at the same time if the entire family does it and you buy the right amounts of raw vegetables and fruits it doesnt hurt the budget as much. I personally eat my own foods because my fiancee will not eat the amount or different types of vegetables and chicken/fish that I consume on a daily basis. This makes it easier to shop for myself but harder to get groceries as a family.

Right now my parents are pretty healthy eaters, of course they like to make the occasional baked good and I just have to pass on them, but as an entire family we do pretty well, except when my older brothers come home. They like their Doritos.

What do you think about this for a post workout meal? I made a smoothie with a lot of milk (1%) a serving of peanut butter and a banana. I switched my lifting up to a hypertrophy phase so I could gain a little mass and weight and I’m surprised at how un sore I am this morning.

Your post workout meal, in my opinion, is the most important as far as making sure your workout was worth the effort. I personally eat nutrient dense foods such as my fish or chicken immediately after my workout. During my workout I have a drink made with 4 egg whites skim milk and chocolate syrup. I dont really know if this is overkill. But its helped my gains.

Ya I’ll give it a week and see what happens if I still lose weight I’ll just continue to increase how much I eat. I just can’t believe I went from being over weight to getting in the danger zone of being to small.

take fish oil.

You can’t just add muscle. It doesn’t work that way.

Eat a reasonable caloric surplus, get 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight on you, and get on a good strength training workout to stimulate muscle hypertrophy and see performance-related gains.

Then diet it off. Unfortunately, it’s a bit late to be doing this - most people “bulk” from the season’s end to about January, then cut from January to the season’s start. Coincidentally, that’s what I did, going to ~255 lbs. as of 3 weeks ago and looking to cut to about 220 lbs. at 6’1".

I’ve been able to do that, thus far, and I think a lot of beginner lifters, especially those with faster metabolisms, can add very little to no fat when “bulking.” For me it’s about 1lb/week when I have my diet under control. I’d imagine once I get closer to 205 or 210 lbs it won’t be as easy.

It is pretty late but I don’t have a high school season so I still have some time to do it, my main focus is just adding some calories so I stop losing weight. I like to get up and work out in the morning and before last week I was just getting up and doing it without eating first so that would explain why I kept losing so much weight, I eat before and after now so I think I’ll probably stay where I’m at. I continue to see gains in speed and strength so it’s not a big deal that I weigh a lot less than I did, if anything it probably makes me a little more project able with college coaches, either that or it will show some dedication. I guess I’ll find out next month.

I’ve been able to do that, thus far, and I think a lot of beginner lifters, especially those with faster metabolisms, can add very little to no fat when “bulking.” For me it’s about 1lb/week when I have my diet under control. I’d imagine once I get closer to 205 or 210 lbs it won’t be as easy.[/quote]

Younger athletes can add a proportionately higher amount of muscle compared to fat, but not all muscle.

A big mistake is when athletes start to look like they’ve added more muscle, they think that they actually have. Not true. If the athlete was at a low BF% to begin with, definition in muscles can happen and make the person think that they are adding muscle but no fat, and then they stop eating enough. It’s a big problem.

If you’re on a caloric surplus gaining weight, you’re adding some fat unless you are a rank beginner - and I mean one with less than 2-3 months of serious training.

Oh, if you don’t have competitive baseball starting in March, you’re fine. Good luck.