Francisco lirianos bad mechanics


#1

i recently read on an ESPN article by buster olney and it quoted the twins pitching coach as saying that he “cuts off” his delivery and olney said that with that and his violent mechanics, he is an injury waiting to happen.
Could someone post lirianos mechanics? WHat does the pitching coach mean when he says liriano cuts off his delivery? What is it about his mechanics that make them violent?


#2

Can you post a link to the article?


#3

#4

Steve—I haven’t seen Francisco Liriano pitch all that much, but I can tell you that what is meant by his “cutting off” his delivery simply means that he doesn’t complete his follow-through, and that in itself puts him at risk for injury. That is something he needs to work on. Nor is he the only one—there have been quite a few pitchers who have put themselves at similar risk by not finishing their pitches. And maybe that’s what observers mean by describing his delivery as “violent”—perhaps “abrupt” might be a better term. As for his reliance on his slider—can’t blame him for that. I fell in love with that pitch; I worked it up; and I used it as my strikeout pitch. But I also had an arsenal of assorted breaking stuff to set batters up for it, and I used all those pitches. Liriano has gotten a start in that direction by using his changeup more. :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:


#5

Lots of forced scap loading and bad timing.

I talk to a Twins AAA guy regularly and the Twins made a concerted effort to correct some of his issues during his TJ rehab. The rehab wasn’t going well last off season and Liriano ditched all the changes, reverting back to what he was comfortable with. IMO, the arm problems are not over for this kid, which is sad.

Seems like we’ve lot an entire generation of the best pitchers.


#6

i think his mechanics are fine
he just has bad arm action


#7

[quote=“kelvinp”]i think his mechanics are fine
he just has bad arm action[/quote]

Arm action isn’t apart of mechanics?


#8

Yes, obviously arm action is part of mechanics but it is just one flaw (a large one), but definately fixable. Liriano lifts his arm with his elbow and then flips his hand over. To fix it he needs to learn how to lift the ball with his hand. I am sure he could fix this problem, but I am willing to bet he will struggle with it mentally. He might not get the same velocity, command and movement that he had before.
He most likely will hurt himself again, but he is who he is as a pitcher and he got there doing it in a way that although not ideal for longevity, was effective for him. Tough spot for anyone to be in.


#9

[quote=“rhermus10”]Yes, obviously arm action is part of mechanics but it is just one flaw (a large one), but definately fixable. Liriano lifts his arm with his elbow and then flips his hand over. To fix it he needs to learn how to lift the ball with his hand. I am sure he could fix this problem, but I am willing to bet he will struggle with it mentally. He might not get the same velocity, command and movement that he had before.
He most likely will hurt himself again, but he is who he is as a pitcher and he got there doing it in a way that although not ideal for longevity, was effective for him. Tough spot for anyone to be in.[/quote]

You hit the nail on the head. Who has the guts to be the pitching coach that changed Francisco Liriano and ended his career? No pitching coach this side of Leo Mazzone can risk that, maybe not even Leo. Its safer to just sit back and let these guys do it themselves.

Its no coincidence the Cubs enjoyed their longest stretch of pitcher health under Oscar Acosta (through 2002). Wood’s health 2001-2003 were a direct result of the mechanical adjustments Acosta made. He was innovative, corrective and on the cutting edge of biomechanical technology. He put the Cubs into the position they ended up in 2003 and 2004 as probably the most talented team in the NL, definitely the deepest pitching staff. Look at what that did for his career. He pissed off Don Baylor, stuffed him in a clubhouse trash can, then got canned and then died. Baseball lost a good one there.