Frame By Frame Analyses - Weaver and Bonderman


#1

I have just completed two analyses of the mechanics of…

These analyses, and especially the Jeff Weaver analysis, should be especially informative because they are based on super slow motion clips.


#2

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]I have just completed two analyses of the mechanics of…

These analyses, and especially the Jeff Weaver analysis, should be especially informative because they are based on super slow motion clips.[/quote]i think one of weavers main flaw, is his bending of his back towards third base, if that dosent make sense, it dosent seem like he stays real tall, i think that could have something to do with his lack of control sometimes


#3

should try to make one on jered weaver. his pitching style is pretty unusual and kinda smooth


#4

It is my opinion that your comments about Bonderman’s elbows being above and behind his shouders being harmful are incorrect. The external rotation that happens during this briefest of moments is well within the normal range of motion for the humerus. The forearm does not go past vertical until AFTER his humerus has returned to shoulder height. Only then does external rotation continue into the more extreme zone, that being from vertical to fully laid back.


#5

Slide 44 of the Bonderman video looks like he’s throwing a breaking pitch which could explain your subsequent comment about him pronating late.


#6

Weaver’s motion is fine. He was coached by a friend of mine who worked with my son. Bonderman’s scapula loading is part of what helps him attain his velocity. He’s clearly throwing a breaking pitch as Roger noted.


#7

[quote=“Tanner Lorenz”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]I have just completed two analyses of the mechanics of…

These analyses, and especially the Jeff Weaver analysis, should be especially informative because they are based on super slow motion clips.[/quote]i think one of weavers main flaw, is his bending of his back towards third base, if that dosent make sense, it dosent seem like he stays real tall, i think that could have something to do with his lack of control sometimes[/quote]

That’s a good point. I was meaning to bring that back-bending thing up as it relates to El Duque.

What’s the deal with it. You think it hurts control or velocity or both.

Or do weaver and el duque just do that because they throw 3/4 so it’s no big deal?

I know el Duque uses all kinds of crazy angles, but even when he comes fairly over-the-top he sort of bends his back frontwards. check out this pic http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/writers/jon_heyman/10/04/daily.scoop/p1_elduque.jpg … it’s similar to around fram 096 of Weaver.


#8

when bending your back and bending to your glove side that means that you have a weak core and need to strenghen it. It’s not the pitchers fault its there own body making a correction because of a weak core.


#9

Can you please look at mike mussina’s pitching mechanics so we can see how he had last so long without injury. he has a differnt way of pitching and i would like to see it. :smiley: :?:


#10

I’m not sure.

It could be that he’s throwing a slider. I checked and he has that pitch in his arsenal.

The only question is the grip. In frame 25 it looks like he’s using a cross-seam 2-seam grip. That’s why I said the pitch might be a cutter.


#11

I toyed with the idea that leaning toward 3B is bad, because I have seen research that says that leaning backwards at the balance point reduces the strain on the arm, but so many long-lived guys do it (including Orlando Hernandez and Nolan Ryan) that it’s probably not significant.


#12

I toyed with the idea that leaning toward 3B is bad, because I have seen research that says that leaning backwards at the balance point reduces the strain on the arm, but so many long-lived guys do it (including Orlando Hernandez and Nolan Ryan) that it’s probably not significant.[/quote]but look at weavers differences in those 2 pitchers, are their strides the same length? and how tall are each one? would those factors make any difference, because i tried to pitch leaning towards third base and it didnt feel good at all, i’d think it would put strain on a lot of parts of your body


#13

I’m not sure what to make about Bonderman.

For one thing, this reminds me of Mark Prior. His PAS elbow is also high as his shoulders start to turn.

However, it’s hard to tell exactly what happens when because he leans so far forward during his stride.


#14

I’m not sure what to make about Bonderman.

For one thing, this reminds me of Mark Prior. His PAS elbow is also high as his shoulders start to turn.

However, it’s hard to tell exactly what happens when because he leans so far forward during his stride.[/quote]prior is much more obvious, his elbows are far lower than his shoulders, its insane how he pitches, it hurts my elbow and shoulder just looking at slides of him pitching


#15

I think there is a safe way, and an unsafe way, to scap load.

The safe way to do it is to keep the elbows below the level of the shoulders as Ryan and Maddux do it. Bonderman’s PAS elbow is awfully high during his scap load, which IMO is a cause for concern.


#16

I agree that the M is much more obvious in the case of Mark Prior (and Anthony Reyes).


#17

I agree that the M is much more obvious in the case of Mark Prior (and Anthony Reyes).[/quote]reyes too, but prior throws much harder than reyes, which is just so odd because it just looks and id think it’d be hard to get any speed on it, what could prior have been like if he hadnt have had such bad mechanics?


#18

I’d love to, but I don’t have a clip of him throwing (not even a CF view).

The same thing goes for guys like Randy Johnson.

If you can find me a clip of them throwing, then I will do a breakdown.


#19

is this good chris

im going to look for more ok i will get back to you


#20

[quote=“Jay21328”]is this good chris

im going to look for more ok i will get back to you[/quote]

I need the source file. You can’t download files from Youtube.