Forearm Bounce


#1

Is this something that you are supposed to try to do? I have looked at pictures and vid’s of me and i have no arm action whats so ever. It is getting to the point where guys are crushing my fastball because of velocity probs and my fastball having no movement just a straight meatball. I will try to post some videos and pictures later. Chris i am not sure if you remember me but i posted some pictures of me awhile back.


#2

Forearm layback or bounce is the EFFECT of velocity, not the CAUSE.

IOW, if videos of you don’t show any layback or bounce, then that means that you simply aren’t throwing that hard.

I use the amount of layback or bounce to get a sense of how hard a guy is (actually) throwing.

In terms of what to do about it, it means that you aren’t generating much rotational power. That could be due to things like an inefficient stride and/or poor hip/shoulder separation (aka opening up too early).

Do you have a video you could post?


#3

No I dont have any video of me right now but i will get some ASAP i have the camera and will probably have some this week


#4

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]I use the amount of layback or bounce to get a sense of how hard a guy is (actually) throwing.[/quote]I don’t subscribe to this idea. I have a still of a kid right at max. ext. rotation with the forearm fully laid back (his parents were shocked when I showed them this.) and who really didn’t throw that hard relative to other kids in his age range. So, I don’t believe it is a sign at all of velocity. I will say though that, if you are NOT getting to full external rotation, you will NOT throw to your maximum potential.

Is it an effect or a cause? Chicken and egg, I think.


#5

[quote=“dm59”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]I use the amount of layback or bounce to get a sense of how hard a guy is (actually) throwing.[/quote]I don’t subscribe to this idea. I have a still of a kid right at max. ext. rotation with the forearm fully laid back (his parents were shocked when I showed them this.) and who really didn’t throw that hard relative to other kids in his age range. So, I don’t believe it is a sign at all of velocity. I will say though that, if you are NOT getting to full external rotation, you will NOT throw to your maximum potential.

Is it an effect or a cause? Chicken and egg, I think.[/quote]

Good post D.M. Every action creates a reaction…no matter. For every cause there is an effect. For every effect there WAS cause. On the otherhand “forearm bounce” is a phrase that one pitching instructor uses and beyond him I have never heard of that.

Not trying to butt heads with Chris… anymore… but the fact is I can take a kid put him on one or both knees and while he is obviously using his torso/shoulders to some extent he is not even coming close to nearing his full potential for power he will still reach significant degrees of max external rotation perhaps without the “bounce” whatever that is?? Which should say something all on its own. The bounce needs to be clearly defined? I know what he means by it but again there is a cause/effect issue here. The definitation can only be defined by clearly identifying the cause as well. In a thinking persons mind knowing there is a “bounce” is one thing, knowing what creates/causes this “bounce” is where the real nuts and bolts are. The real nuts and bolts are in part this, the bounce is created by elastic energy that has been stored it presents itself in the form of “torque”. There is also a “ammorazation[sp]” component here as well. The time it takes to go from max E.R. to I.R. is key in regards to velocity. THe sooner the better, in a perfect world it would be eliminated altogether but that is impossible. After all IF one could take a person put him in max E.R. [which is probably impossible without the development of enough torque] and he than waits seconds to go into I.R. the potential for velocity is greatly diminished and no doubt gone all together. In short the quicker the E.R. to I.R. the more “bounce” or better said “torque” has been created. In that regard Chris is correct but to use it as a guide for velocity is flawed in my opinion. thats what radar is for IF one is trying to measure velocity alone.

This is another reason why when looking at pitching mechanics it is beneficial to also start at the end and work towards the beginning. This is a good way to filter through the cause/effect relationships in a delivery. It does make sense when trying to evaluate what causes a “flaw”. If you see a flaw, by working backwards you than can see the “cause” of the effect which is the flaw itself.