Football & basketball coaches for pitching


#1

So I was watching this new reality show on MTV last night called ‘two-a-days’ that follows around this powerhouse high school football team from Alabama …

… and the team’s coach before the game and in practice was giving these guys these very loud motivational talks … sometimes he’d rip into them … sometimes he’d praise them… sometimes he’d rip the opposition … and always at a high volume…

I gotta say, I love that stuff. It reminded me of this basketball coach I had in high school. He was horrible when it came to xs and os but he could talk and get you fired up.

That kind of talk really gets me juiced. It’s rare to find a baseball coach who motivates like that, isn’t it? I mean, the pace of the game and the humility required doesn’t seem to lend itself to that kind of ra-ra type of coaching…

But I can’t help but think that before taking the mound, I would love to have a coach yell at me and get me mad at the opposition and all that stuff … get me ready to run through a wall … although, maybe that wouldn’t be a good thing

I guess it depends on your personality … I think that because my personaility is so laid back, I can always use a kick.


#2

I have to agree with you 100 percent. My coach in high school tried to pump us up, but it never really worked for me. I always had to jack myself up before I took the mound. It would really revolutionize the game if coaches yelled at their teams to motivate them, give it a whole new character filled with tooth-and-nail dogfights and revamped intensity and drive.


#3

Doesn’t work for most pitchers. Most pitchers have to be in control of themselves rather than pumped up. Pumped up pitchers tend to overthrow. The exception is some closers who feed on intensity. However, they don’t usually need any help from a coach.

In general the football type coaches can help for a few games with that approach but over an entire season it wears thin very quickly and the players will usually be demotivated by it.

It shouldn’t be surprising that it works that way since there are very few football games played over the course of a season, and most football positions place a premium on aggressiveness over thinking.

That is why football coaches don’t usually do well trying to coach baseball over an extended season unless they can change their approach.


#4

[quote=“CADad”]Doesn’t work for most pitchers. Most pitchers have to be in control of themselves rather than pumped up. Pumped up pitchers tend to overthrow. The exception is some closers who feed on intensity. However, they don’t usually need any help from a coach.
[/quote]

I think you’re better off pitching with a chip on your shoulder rather than pumping yourself up football-style. That was the motivation I took to the mound: It’s one on one. You and the hitter. And he’s trying to take your draft slot. Are you going to let him?

Some of the best pitching coaches I’ve had were able to instil that kind of thinking with the pitchers on staff, as opposed to the football ra-ra stuff, which doesn’t really work.


#5

All true … certainly at the professional level, ra ra would wear thin over a long season …

Having an ideal chip-on-the-shoulder mentality for pitching is well put … And I do think there is a fine line between “football coach” motivation, and the chip-on-the-shoulder mentality.

I find I do best when I feel I have something to prove, and to feel this way, I have to be angry at some level … problem is, sometimes I need a little help finding that certain anger …

I mean, if it’s a beautiful day out, and the opponent is mediocre, it’s hard not to think “oh, everything is right in the world” … at times like those I could really use a football or hoops guy to scream at me about all that is at stake.


#6

On a related thought… you know how all of those pre- and post- game football roundtable shows are so jokey and jocular … now compare their behavior (which I find perfectly acceptable) to the dimeanor of the baseball tonight crew (which I am a big fan of) … one is very animated, the other is somewhat animated but much more analytical.

Perhaps this is another example of what sets the game of baseball apart as far as an emotional level … it’s just different.

I remember once Deion Sanders said that his football teams had more comoraderie than his baseball teams.