Flying Open


#1

What are the best cues/drills to avoid “flying open”? Is it more an issue of not staying back or closed long enough (or both)? Thanks


#2

Work on equal and opposite at foot strike…impossible to fly open there


#3

Like JD said, the closer to foot plant you can be equal and opposite, the more you’ll avoid flying open. If it feels like you having to hold the equal and opposite position too artificially long, get your butt moving faster down the hill to get into foot plant quicker.


#4

Thanks JD & Roger. Not for me but for my son. He’s HS Soph with issue identified but guess I’m just looking for a magic cure. Throws pretty well now: sitting low 80’s and topping out at 85. Issues missing high and hanging offspeed sometimes. Works with a pitching coach. Tells him he needs to stay back. Sometimes he does and sometimes he doesn’t.


#5

Guys, just to be clear, are we talking equal and opposite as far as bend in the elbow joints? Please explain. Thanks.


#6

How about if a youth pitchers hips are too open at foot plant? Many youth pitchers don’t have the core strength and flexibility to maintain their shoulders being closed w wide open hips.


#7

I’m trying to picture in my mind how that could happen if you get to e/o at foot strike…can you open your hips before you plant? I guess if you stride open…if pitch gets some vid we’ll know :wink:


#8

The hips start to open into foot plant no?


#9

Yes, equal bends in the elbows. But also parallel upper arms. If the throwing arm extends down, glove arm should be up ala Andy Pettite. Or think Tim Lincecum.


#10

Some pitchers - especially young pitchers - swing the front leg open and step towards home plate leading with the front leg instead of the front hip. Need to get them to get their center of mass moving faster and lead with the hip. Lots of Hershiser drill and Cross-over drill.


#11

Yes, as dictated by one’s flexibility. Or, at least, that’s what we want - stay closed as long as possible, open the hips into foot plant only as much as required based on flexibility to open the front foot/leg into foot plant, and then complete hip rotation after foot plant.

Need to recognize that pitchers have different flexibility. At one end of the scale would be someone like Sebathia while someone like Lincecum would be at the other end of the scale. Obviously, both of these guys are good.


#12

Yes, equal bends in the elbows. But also parallel upper arms. I the throwing arm extends down, glove arm should be up ala Andy Pettite. Or think Tim Lincecum.[/quote]

Thanks for the clarification. I especially like the parallel upper arms.