Fixing a Long Swing


#1

I am having issues with my swing being too long. I can hit fine off and tee and soft toss without getting what some people call alligators arms where your hands are out in front of your body. It when i see live pitching that it seems to come back to getting long. I end up getting jamed and little bloops to RF. anything i can to to try and fix it?

thanks


#2

Just try goin to the batting cages with someone that knows about hitting and maybe they can help you


#3

Start off with your hands far back, and when you load, do not move your hands back.


#4

It would be hard to tell without seeing a video or at least a series of pics.

It sounds like maybe when you’re getting live pitching it may not be that your swing is that long, maybe you wait to long, maybe you are more worried about just making contact. There could be all sorts of mental things about it if it’s okay off the tee and soft toss.

But again I can’t really say if it’s physical or mental without seeing video.


#5

Widening your stance would help, too.


#6

Unless the reason is that it is too wide, like I said we need video or a picture first.

A batting stance is a very personal thing it’s all about your comfortability and balance but you also have to remember as with anything there are universal rules to it, such as having your legs at least shoulder width apart, slightly bent knees, so that you can’t see you shoe laces when you look down and having a clear view of the pitcher.


#7

Amen, amen. Having too wide of a stance limits hip rotation.


#8

Yes it is and so is too narrow a stance. One person on my team last year was a prime example of too wide a stance, he was still a good hitter in fact I think he hit above .400 but his wide stance limited his power.

His little brother is an example of too narrow of one and it keeps him from being balanced and he has trouble hitting higher pitches because this stance forces him to swing almost directly upwards.


#9

thanks for the responses guys. Batting cages i can hit fine in but its live pitching where the problems occur.


#10

I like to think of ‘jump into the box’. I take an athletic stance with my feet shoulder width apart.


#11

If it’s live pitching then your problem is probably just timing a pitcher properly. Different pitchers throw at different speeds at different times whereas a machine throws essentially the same pitch over and over.

Make sure your stride foot hits the ground before the ball is released but not so early that you get thrown off balance. Pay attention to the pitcher’s motion, time your stride according to the tempo of his delivery, and remember some pitchers you will have to wait as long as you can and some guys you will have to consciously try to hit it a little further out in front of you. But don’t get caught up in only hitting his fastball remember to keep your eye peeled at recognizing an off speed pitch.

Hammer described pitch recognition very well in another thread I think just one or two threads below this one.


#12

Timing timing timing. Make sure your stride foot is getting down early enough. You can’t start your swing until your foot lands. Error on the early side. Get ready to hit!


#13

I agree that without seeing video, it is difficult to say exactly, but I want to offer my interpretation. I see hitters get long for several reasons: 1. if you are not relaxed during live pitching your arms will tend to swing with your body instead of having a disconnect, which creates “casting”. 2. if you do not clear your front side shoulder during the swing this will tend to cause “casting” as well. Also typically a result of being tight. 3. If you are being top hand dominant to the ball, your bat will “cast” because you are pushing rather than pulling with the front hand and knob of the bat. 4. Overstriding will also cause this because you will not be able to clear your hips prior to your hands coming through. and Lastly 5. If your back side collapses your bat head will drop and sweep through the zone causing weak popups to the opposite field. Back side collapsing is when you do not get high on the back toe during the swing. Contrary to many beliefs, you get high on the toe due to a pull from the front side vs a drive from the back or “squish the bug”. Hope this helps.


#14

Good post Dawg.

and this may be pretty obvious - but where are you in the box? If you are standing too far away from the plate you are setting yourself up to have to cast to hit the outside part of the plate. Make sure you have good plate coverage when you setup in the box.