Finishing the game

my last two outings, in the first 6 out of seven innings combined ive given up one run, in the last 2 7th innings ive given up seven in just those 2 innings compared to one in the other 12, help please.

there could have been alot of factors involved. you could have just been worn out, they saw you a few times through the lineup and were probably timing you well.

did you start walking people??

i walked one in each of the last two 7th innings

no errors either?

only from the ump, but what can ya do

i hear ya. maybe it was just due to you getting tired and losing command of your pitches.

Maybe it was because I was a finesse pitcher—a snake-jazzer with not much on speed and therefore having to rely on good breaking stuff—but I never had a problem there. I would start a game, and I would finish it, usually not throwing more than 85 pitches (usually mostly for strikes, something like 72 or 73). And being one of those exasperating sidearmers who used the crossfire extensively, I wasn’t inclined to give up a lot of hits. Maybe two or three, usually followed by nice juicy double plays so I would face the minimum. And my teammates usually gave me a nice cushion to sit on, or pitch from. I had fun. 8) :slight_smile:

yea, im a finesse, and power pitcher, i throw that sinker with command, but it being in the upper 70s in a 13-15 year old league its definitely some heat. i just cant seem to kkeep my confidence in that last inning as in each game we had a two run lead going into the 7th. any advice?

You just hit on the problem. You have to train yourself to throw with the same confidence in a tight situation as you do with no score in the 1st inning. It’s tough when kids are yelling in the dugout and parents are going crazy in the stands. Unfortunately, the mental aspect of pitching is CRITICAL and will not get easier as you climb the ranks. Find a way to block out the noise, find a way to tell yourself that you’re going to throw strikes and get batters out in tight situations and find a way to pick up the pieces when that doesn’t happen. Learn from the great closers (e.g., Mariano Rivera). They have to do that every night.

Good luck.

What were the dates, exactly how many pitches have you thrown in each outing this season, and if you can. what were the balls and strikes in each inning? Compare the games and I’ll bet you’ll get an idea about what was happening.

Take a look at this link.
http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/4pman.pdf

That’s a list of each pitcher’s outings for the last 5 years for our HSV team. Look at the kids who were obviously the horses and throwing the most, and I think you’ll see a trend that the more pitches they threw, the more runs they gave up, and the higher their WHIP was. Of course that won’t be true 100% of the time for a lot of different reasons, but I think its safe to say that in general, the more pitches a pitcher throws in a game, the more likely he’s gonna start having problems.

My point is, while finishing the game historically has macho feel about it, the reality is, its not always a good idea to try to finish every game.

I think it’s important as a coach to “go with what you know” at the high school level.

If the pitcher on the mound is throwing well in the 8th and 9th innings, you’re better off leaving him in the game than bringing in another pitcher, even if that other pitcher has historically performed well – because you never know how he’s going to pitch in this particular situation. But you do know what the kid on the mound is capable of. Go with what you know!

Steve, it’s important at any level of the game. Look at what happened on Monday. Bartolo Colon, long may he win, was reaching a high pitch-count level going into the ninth inning, and the Yankees had Joba heating up in the bullpen, but Joe Girardi went with his gut, and his gut told him to let Colon try to finis the game. And Colon did; he ended up with a gem of a four-hit shutout. Never mind the pitch count, Girardi said to himself, this guy is as strong now as he was at the start of the game—what was his fast ball, 95 or something? He made me think of Allie Reynolds at his best.
And Freddy Garcia pitch extraordinarily well for seven innings—the Yankees are sort of stretching him out. He did go deep into the game, and all relievers Ayala and Pendleton did was tie up a few loose ends. I bet next time out Girardi will let him try to go all the way.
It all brought back some very pleasant memories for me, of the days when pitchers would go all the way. First Sabathia, then Colon. Now A.J. Burnett is starting this afternoon—will he, perhaps, be next?
That’s all it takes. Get a good pitcher out there and let him pitch, and give him some runs, and just like that we have a win. (And it didn’t hurt that the White Sox beat the Red Sox last night, so the Yankees are back in first place by a full game, yum yum yum, delicious.) :smiley:

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]I think it’s important as a coach to “go with what you know” at the high school level.

If the pitcher on the mound is throwing well in the 8th and 9th innings, you’re better off leaving him in the game than bringing in another pitcher, even if that other pitcher has historically performed well – because you never know how he’s going to pitch in this particular situation. But you do know what the kid on the mound is capable of. Go with what you know![/quote]

I’m hoping you meant the 6th and 7th for HS games.

I’m sorry, but that kind of logic makes no sense without further explanation. FI, if you’re talking about either a Fr or JV game, its absurd to leave a pitcher out there. The whole purpose of those levels are develop players, so the thing that would make the most sense is to get as many pitchers as much experience as possible. Of course if the coach doesn’t have the ability or desire to develop pitchers, he could just go with 3 or 4 kids the whole season.

For V games, things are different. Not all games mean the same thing, and not all game situations are the same. FI. If your team is winning or losing 8-1 in the 5th, what sense does it make not to bring in a new pitcher for the 6th? Or, what if it’s a scrimmage or non-conference game that means absolutely nothing in relation to the playoffs?

I certainly understand doing something like that in the pros where $$$ rides on every game, or in an amateur title game of some sort. But to take that stance for every game is IMHO painting the picture with far too broad a brush.

We play 9 inning games with wood during the regular season. But now in the state high school tournament, were back to aluminum and 7.

I saw that game, Monday, Zita!

Wow. Ya learn something new every day. I’ve never heard of any HS team playing 9 inning games as a matter of course, other than in scrimmage or pre-season games. I;ve heard of wood only, but only in NY for an entire league.

What’s thinking behind doing that?