Finding the "natural" arm slot


#1

I found this selection in a NY Post profile of Mets outfield prospect Lastings Milledge:

" Milledge has been working with med-balls, essentially a softball-sized medicine ball to throw against a trampoline to gain the proper throwing motion. Then he goes to the mound in the cages after morning stretches and throws a regular baseball “downhill’’ like a pitcher. It’s all part of spring training work.

Why use a heavy ball? “Once you grab something that’s heavy,’’ Milledge said, “you go back to your natural (arm) slot.’’ "\


… so the question is, is this true. When you throw a heavier ball you naturally go into your natural arm slot???

Seems to me that you would logically find a lower arm slot, given it’s heavier-ness and all.


#2

one word-----football-----I have heard of pro pitchers tossing them around reportedly to build muscle around the rotator cuff,but maybe theres more to it…


#3

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]
… so the question is, is this true. When you throw a heavier ball you naturally go into your natural arm slot???

Seems to me that you would logically find a lower arm slot, given it’s heavier-ness and all.[/quote]

Depends on how you do it. Here’s a link to a pitcher who trains by throwing iron balls, among other things. Incidentally, he’s been doing it every day for three years. In early March he starts a cycle where he’ll throw the 15 pounder 96 reps per day (one set). And then he’ll throw baseballs. Every day. You’ll note that the arm is relatively high and that the arm action looks nothing like what you think of when it comes to pitching. Also note that his body rotation does not stop with the chest facing forward. What you’re seeing is his full windup mechanic, just like he throws baseballs. (For scale, he’s 6’-4 and about 215.)

I wouldn’t recommend this with a conventional arm action. You’ll head directly for the hospital.


#4

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]I found this selection in a NY Post profile of Mets outfield prospect Lastings Milledge:

" Milledge has been working with med-balls, essentially a softball-sized medicine ball to throw against a trampoline to gain the proper throwing motion. Then he goes to the mound in the cages after morning stretches and throws a regular baseball “downhill’’ like a pitcher. It’s all part of spring training work.[/quote]

This sounds like something they do at Tom House’s facility in San Diego. The pitcher actually leans against a device that has pads for the front of the hips to rest against and pegs for the back of the ankles to lock under. The device puts the pitcher in a position where they are leaning forward. To throw, the pitcher arches the low back to raise the head and shoulders upright. The pitcher then reverse rotates the shoulders before throwing the med ball into a small trampoline. At release, the torso bends forward but must be raised back up to catch the ball coming back off the trampoline. The ball used is, I believe, a 4lb ball. It is NOT thrown at full force.

I believe it helped to exagerate the loading of the shoulders as well as the forward rotation of the shoulders. It is basically a core strength and flexibility exercise. It doesn’t really have anything to do with the arm.

[quote]“Once you grab something that’s heavy,’’ Milledge said, “you go back to your natural (arm) slot.’’


… so the question is, is this true. When you throw a heavier ball you naturally go into your natural arm slot???

Seems to me that you would logically find a lower arm slot, given it’s heavier-ness and all.[/quote]
I don’t know about going to your natural arm slot. But what I do know is that you’ll adjust to a position of strength where you can safely handle the extra weight. This normally means bringing the hand closer to the body.


#5

the question there is wether or not he was interested in a natural arm slot.He appears to be forcing the high arm slot,not to mention the extreme arm turnover.Unbelieveable.How long can an arm take that?


#6

He not ‘forcing’ a high arm slot at all. Body rotation carries the upper arm and elbow to this point naturally when the ball is up in the driveline.

Like I said, he’s been doing this for almost three straight years. He missed a couple of days when he had wisdom teeth pulled. In a biomechanical sense this is very close to perfect, and it’s why we have to change how we throw. He is using very large muscles to accelerate (and decelerate the ball) instead of using the elastic capability of tendons and ligaments. Fatigue, yes. Structural damage, no.


#7

[quote=“Coach45”][quote=“andrew.ra.”]
… so the question is, is this true. When you throw a heavier ball you naturally go into your natural arm slot???

Seems to me that you would logically find a lower arm slot, given it’s heavier-ness and all.[/quote]

Depends on how you do it. Here’s a link to a pitcher who trains by throwing iron balls, among other things. Incidentally, he’s been doing it every day for three years. In early March he starts a cycle where he’ll throw the 15 pounder 96 reps per day (one set). And then he’ll throw baseballs. Every day. You’ll note that the arm is relatively high and that the arm action looks nothing like what you think of when it comes to pitching. Also note that his body rotation does not stop with the chest facing forward. What you’re seeing is his full windup mechanic, just like he throws baseballs. (For scale, he’s 6’-4 and about 215.)

I wouldn’t recommend this with a conventional arm action. You’ll head directly for the hospital.

Is this the way Mike Marshall teaches pitchers to throw? Holly Crap!


#8

[quote=“tfree20116”]
Is this the way Mike Marshall teaches pitchers to throw?[/quote]

Throwing the iron ball is only one component of his teaching methodology. There’s a whole lot more to it.