Fielding position or not?

After a pitcher releases the baseball should he be in a good fielding position or you would rather have him throw his hardest and fall off to one side of the mound?

Correct me if your wrong but if your falling off to one side of the mound there’s something wrong with the direction of your stride or you line up way to the side of the rubber.
But, to answer your question: You always want to be in a good fielding position regardless.

[quote=“Ng17”]Correct me if your wrong but if your falling off to one side of the mound there’s something wrong with the direction of your stride or you line up way to the side of the rubber.
But, to answer your question: You always want to be in a good fielding position regardless.[/quote]

Agree 100% … however you will have others chime in that will disagree.

Not me, fielding well means less pitches and less pitches is good. You have to wonder how many games were won by Greg Maddux’s fielding efforts. He stayed in the game longer and increased the chances of his winning. Nope I’ve always believed that defense is good…good defense…not bad…good. If you are good enough not to need to field…you are good too. At higher levels it means a factor of safety also. I always point to that liner that Matt Clements took off of the side of his head in Boston. Career threatening and life threatening.

Of course, if a pitcher is actually fielding balls, then his pitching must have been good enough to result in fieldable balls. :wink:

Don’t sacrifice your pitching just to end up in good fielding position. But make sure your pitching mechanics allow you to end up in as good of fielding position as possible.

I like what Roger said. Don’t take a few mph off of the pitch just to land in a good fielding position. Theres a bigger chance they may hit it farther if you take those mph’s off.

That’s what I was trying to say. If you fall off to the side of the mound you are not in a good fielding position but you don’t lose any velocity off your fastball.

Ok I see what you were saying now,
I agree don’t go through drastic changes to get into that perfect fielding position. But don’t leave yourself out there helpless or it will be a rude awaking. :shock:

Well theres both ends of the spectrum at a professional level, so I hardly think there is a correct answer.

Yeah, Maddux won games with his glove, thats all well and good. But who wants to see what KRod looks like when he drastically changes things to land better. Gibson? Pedro? You need to do whats natural. If your not a horribly violent lander, then make some adjustments so that you can field your position. But if you fall off hard, spin around, ect… changing things means you risk your stuff and control.

I used to be a violent fall off guy. I’ve worked on it a bit, now I’m a little better, but I still dont land in a perfect position.

I myself am a fan of falling off towards 1st (righty) its a beautiful sign of rotation

Beckett,

My opinion is that finishing upright is usually an indication of something not being performed optimally. In the case of the pitcher in the video you posted, it lookes like he plants his stride foot early and has a short stride. He probably also fails to generate much momentum. So, I’d say that pitcher needs to make some improvements and after doing so would most likely not finish so upright.

Don’t make your finish be a goal - let it be a result. But if it is an indicator of some other deficiency, then fix the deficiency.

I’ll just say this, no matter where you end, it will only help your cause to work on being the very best fielder you can be. The same applies to run game suppression. Why not utilize every single aspect of the variables in front of you, have those two other tangible skills as well as power, control and a multi-pitch arsenal.

I agree with Pirates09, if you fall off towards the side then it shows really good hip rotation.

Yea, there’s no reason that you can’t be a great fielder despite falling off. Gibson had one of the most violent landings ever, but I believe he also won some gold gloves.