Felix Hernandez Slow Mo Change Up

If you analyze his mechanics, do you see any flaws?

very few. I believe his tempo could be slightly faster based on a previous frame count (I think he was about 3-4 frames slower than most high level throwers, potentially compensating for that with his size and strength)

You saying his Motion is slow?

Does he have a leg pause?

yes. You’ll notice the same phenomena with Papelbon as well as Beckett - they can get away with a 27 or 28 frame tempo from leg lift to release in part due to their massive size and strength, and still throw 95+. The most efficient mechanics are sub 24 frame tempos (24 being the high end, 21 being pretty typical for a 95 mph thrower of average proportions and Oswalt being the absolute low end at about 19 -20 frames).

compare this to the 30+ frame tempos of most low-level throwers on this site…

yes. You’ll notice the same phenomena with Papelbon as well as Beckett - they can get away with a 27 or 28 frame tempo from leg lift to release in part due to their massive size and strength, and still throw 95+. The most efficient mechanics are sub 24 frame tempos (24 being the high end, 21 being pretty typical for a 95 mph thrower of average proportions and Oswalt being the absolute low end at about 19 -20 frames).

compare this to the 30+ frame tempos of most low-level throwers on this site…[/quote]

Where are you starting your frame count? Top of the leg lift?

I think you have to be careful with counting frames. As a general (very general) rule this may be the case with the frame counts you mention, but you can’t just make a blanket statement and say…if you have this frame count, then you will throw 95…or something of that manner.

Just don’t always work that way and there are lot’s of variable that effect velocity.

That being said I would agree that a slow(er) tempo isn’t the best thing for high velocity.

Did I just contradict myself lol :lol:

I never claimed this. But it’s one factor that can inhibit velocity, and 99% of high level throwers do this part right (they do a bunch of other stuff right too, but tempo is one thing that is consistent across the board)

I forgot to mention Joba Chamberlain also has a slightly slower tempo for a high level thrower which makes sense given his size.

The tempo count is from the top of the knee lift to release point.

I would say that to some degree you are right Lanky, that slower tempos could have something to do with slower fastballs. But I would disagree with you that 99% of high level throwers have a quick tempo. I would say that some high level throwers do, but not that many. Lester, Beckett, Rivera, Bard, Felix, Haren are all guys who throw in the 90s and have slower tempos. It is compensated for their strength yes. I don’t think that increasing your tempo necessarily increases velocity, it may make the body more efficent, explosive, and allow the kinetic chain to sequence better. But its not just because of the tempo change, its the effect of the tempo change.

let me rephrase: 99% of 95+ mph throwers who are not physical specimens have very very quick tempos. Those who are physical specimens still have moderately quick tempos compared to most low level throwers.

the rest we seem to agree on.

wow. he really counter-rotates which is frowned upon by many posters. he also doesn’t lock out with the front knee before he releases the ball. there is still some flex in his front knee. beautiful body. these guys have extremely strong legs. outstanding release point.

gibson says that is the moment of truth, doesn’t care how you get there, but can you get to that ideal release position and do it consistently.

Does he have a pause in his delivery?