Feedback on 13U Pitching Mechanics

I would appreciate if you could provide some feedback on my 13 year’s pitching mechanics. He throws fastball, change-up and a developing curve. He has had “little league elbow” at 10 yrs and 11 yrs old, but not at 12 years old. We have worked hard on improving his mechanics and we are continuing to work on improving his lower body work. Any advice would be appreciated.

Not bad, but sometimes its hard to determine what things are wrong with him on the mound when he isn’t actually on one. Thought you can diagnose larger problems but I don’t see many. Any chance of film on a mound?

drx10,

Your Son’s Front Foot position at his Foot Strike indicates too much separation between his Foot Strike and his ball release. He essentially throws entirely with his Upper Body. The misdirected force caused by your Son’s open Front Hip is causing his Throwing Arm ailments.

From what I see in his posted motion, your Son’s “free fall” into his Foot Strike generates too much forward momentum and little to no linear rotation. Without bringing your Son’s weight back, he’ll forever struggle with his results and Throwing Arm ailments.

The Professional Pitching Solution: Begin by asking your Son to bring his Head back to over his Back Foot. It’s important, when doing this, for your Son to bend his Back Knee to bring his Head over his Back Foot. Once he’s done this, please post another video so we can see how his Arms and Legs react to this simple adjustment … we’ll take a look at the new video to give more direction.

L.A. “Skip” Fast
Professional Pitching Solutions
http://www.professionalpitchingsolutions.com

[quote=“Professional Pitching Sol”]Your Son’s Front Foot position at his Foot Strike indicates too much separation between his Foot Strike and his ball release. He essentially throws entirely with his Upper Body. The misdirected force caused by your Son’s open Front Hip is causing his Throwing Arm ailments.

From what I see in his posted motion, your Son’s “free fall” into his Foot Strike generates too much forward momentum and little to no linear rotation. Without bringing your Son’s weight back, he’ll forever struggle with his results and Throwing Arm ailments.

The Professional Pitching Solution: Begin by asking your Son to bring his Head back to over his Back Foot. It’s important, when doing this, for your Son to bend his Back Knee to bring his Head over his Back Foot. Once he’s done this, please post another video so we can see how his Arms and Legs react to this simple adjustment … we’ll take a look at the new video to give more direction.[/quote]

This is 100% wrong.

For instance, how in the world is a pitcher supposed to release the ball with his head over his back foot?

Why is a kid with a history of elbow problems working on a curveball?

I would drop the curve and stick with the FB and CH.

I don’t think Sol was totally off base, he just didn’t explain himself very well.

Looks like he opens just a tad early and strides to a “foot open” position which studies have shown produce increased kinetics in the shoulder and elbow. I would suggest a slight inward rotation of the hips with his leg lift, knee to the back shoulder.

Overall, looks pretty athletic.

I’m confused. Are you looking for head to be behind his knee (closer to 2nd base) at the balance point? We have always been instructed to have his head directly over his rear foot.

I know he has the tendency to open his front foot, which appears to open the hips early.

As for the curve ball, his has never thrown one in game situation, just on the sidewalk. Our focus is on proper mechanics. I don’t think that I am going be able to stop him from fooling around with the curve. If we don’t teach him the correct mechanics, then his will copy poor mechancis from teammates or older players. So I try to teach the proper mechanics and limit the numbers in practice.

[quote=“RBish11”]Looks like he opens just a tad early and strides to a “foot open” position which studies have shown produce increased kinetics in the shoulder and elbow. [/quote]Do you have links to those studies? I’d be curious to read them. Thanks.

I see this.

Kids don’t get hurt by the couple of curveballs they throw in games, they get hurt by all of the curveballs they throw in practice.

If I had a kid with a history of elbow problems, I wouldn’t let him pitch AT ALL, much less have him work on his curveball.

[quote=“drx10”]Are you looking for head to be behind his knee (closer to 2nd base) at the balance point?[/quote]I’d forget about the term and whole idea of the “balance point”. Actually, he doesn’t go there anyway, which is good, IMO.

[quote=“drx10”]I know he has the tendency to open his front foot, which appears to open the hips early.[/quote]Opening the hips early, as in just before foot plant, is not a flaw. It’s a positive. It’s when the shoulders open before foot plant that you need to be watchful for. I don’t believe this pitcher is opening his shoulders early but it’s very hard to tell in a Youtube video since you can’t move through it frame by frame.

[quote=“drx10”]As for the curve ball, his has never thrown one in game situation, just on the sidewalk. Our focus is on proper mechanics. I don’t think that I am going be able to stop him from fooling around with the curve. If we don’t teach him the correct mechanics, then his will copy poor mechancis from teammates or older players. So I try to teach the proper mechanics and limit the numbers in practice.[/quote]I agree with this approach.

Chris, just went to your website and it is very impressive (tons of information). I think that I just found out how I am going to spend the rest of my vacation!

Here is the ASMI summary of the study (I’m struggling to find the actual study online now, maybe they removed it):

http://www.asmi.org/asmiweb/research/usedarticles/improper_pitching.htm

“Three different kinematic parameters correlated with increased anterior force applied to the arm at the shoulder during arm cocking: placement of the lead foot to the open side, pointing of the lead foot towards the open side, and increased shoulder external rotation at the instant of foot contact.”

Here it is with some numbers:

http://www.jssm.org/vol6/n1/1/v6n1-1text.php

“Those pitchers who were found to deviate from these norms toward open foot position and alignment showed increased kinetics at the shoulder. For every extra centimeter the stride foot lands toward the ‘open’ side, an extra 3.0N of maximum shoulder anterior force was found during the arm cocking phase. Further, if the stride leg was placed at an open foot angle, this too increased the maximum shoulder anterior force during the cocking phase at a rate of 2.1N per degree of open foot placement.”

It looks like the kids elbow gets way above the shoulder. Atleast as much as Mark Prior. By the way this is my 200th post.

[quote=“metfan6986”]It looks like the kids elbow gets way above the shoulder. Atleast as much as Mark Prior.[/quote]Not really, but what’s the problem with his elbow height? You been on Chris’ site lately? You do realize that not everyone agrees with his categorization of the evils of the high elbow on the way back.

I second this suggestion.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=“Professional Pitching Sol”]Your Son’s Front Foot position at his Foot Strike indicates too much separation between his Foot Strike and his ball release. He essentially throws entirely with his Upper Body. The misdirected force caused by your Son’s open Front Hip is causing his Throwing Arm ailments.

From what I see in his posted motion, your Son’s “free fall” into his Foot Strike generates too much forward momentum and little to no linear rotation. Without bringing your Son’s weight back, he’ll forever struggle with his results and Throwing Arm ailments.

The Professional Pitching Solution: Begin by asking your Son to bring his Head back to over his Back Foot. It’s important, when doing this, for your Son to bend his Back Knee to bring his Head over his Back Foot. Once he’s done this, please post another video so we can see how his Arms and Legs react to this simple adjustment … we’ll take a look at the new video to give more direction.[/quote]

This is 100% wrong.

For instance, how in the world is a pitcher supposed to release the ball with his head over his back foot?[/quote]
My interpretation of PPS’s suggestion is simply to lead with the front hip. That teach is, I think, fairly well understood to mean through the stride and into foot plant. After that, the head and shoulders catch up and pass the front hip (as the shoulders rotate and the trunk flexes forward).

i think you should bend your knees a little bit and get your momentum going towards home plate earlier

Why is a kid with a history of elbow problems working on a curveball?

I would drop the curve and stick with the FB and CH.[/quote]
Little League Elbow is an overuse injury. Dropping the curveball won’t address the issue.

[quote=“drx10”]I’m confused. Are you looking for head to be behind his knee (closer to 2nd base) at the balance point? We have always been instructed to have his head directly over his rear foot.

I know he has the tendency to open his front foot, which appears to open the hips early.[/quote]
The real concern is the timing problem of opening the shoulders early. The foot position is only a concern to the extent that it contributes to early hip and shoulder rotation.

I agree with your strategy. Kids will be kids and they’ll figure out on their own how to throw curves whether it be the right way or the wrong way. Better to teach them the correct way. But it’s also very important to teach them why the curve can be a problem and that the number of curves thrown needs to be limited.