Fast twitch muscle fibers


#1

Yeah, I have doing a lot of research on how to maximize fast twitch fibers. A lot of what I have been reading says you need to do explosive max effort low reps to convert the maximum amount of super fast twitch fibers out of your regular medium fast twitch fibers.

Shouldn’t pitchers be trying to maximize fast twitch fibers. I am looking at this from a sprinting standpoint so I am not quite sure how this applies to upper body exercises right now, but it seems like most pitchers are working out higher reps slowly.

Could someone clear up why pitchers generally do not lift low heavy explosive reps?

Thanks :slight_smile:


#2

Cause “some” people are afraid of getting injured by the big, bad, free weights.


#3

You have type 2a and type 2b muscle fibers. Type 2a builds more muscular endurance, like being able to perform 20 pullups. You can have 20 explosive pullups but it will make you bigger more than actually stronger. But if you put 45 pounds around you and do only 3 pullups you won’t get as big but you will get stronger.

This can explain how some lightweight olympic lifters can throw so much weight over their head when they look like toothpicks.


#4

i’ve found this site to be a great resource. http://www.inno-sport.net/Index.htm


#5

If I’m understanding it correctly, I don’t think you can “convert” slow twitch to fast twitch fibers. All you can do is train more explosively to maximize the power that can be generated from your fast twitch fibers. So certainly low rep, highly explosive movements would be beneficial – in the off-season.


#6

one of the writers on the website that I linked suggests that this is in fact not the case. I’m still trying to understand it myself so I’ll wait until I can explain it better before I try to refute what you have said.


#7

I’ll also look into this. I remember reading an article about it in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning (nsca-lift.org) a few years back.


#8

one of the writers on the website that I linked suggests that this is in fact not the case. I’m still trying to understand it myself so I’ll wait until I can explain it better before I try to refute what you have said.[/quote]

Thanks for the link.

I have been studying this quite a bit. From what I know now you can convert all of your 2a fibers to full 2x fibers. 2a are the ones in between the super fast twitch and slow twitch.

I will be reading up on this website. It would be really awesome if it were possible to convert slow to fast, but that would mean their would be a hole lot more super fast sprinters.


#9

It’s a chicken and egg argument. When athletes are examined, the slow twitch athletes are found to have more slow twitch fibers and explosive athletes have more fast twitch. The question then becomes, do they have more of these types of fibers because they participate in this activity, or did they join this activity because of their muscle type? If you have lots of fast twitch muscle, you will not be good at cross country, so you would probably quit.

Regardless to these symantics above, what you can change is the fiber size of your fast twitch muscle and improve your recruitment of said muscle. Training with max loads and using sub-max loads explosively are good ways to do this.