Exercises/games for young pitchers

My young pitcher is only 9. I don’t want him lifting weights yet. However, are there certain other activities, games, etc. that would you suggest to achieve similar benefits for the younger guys?

Thanks,
Mike

Well if he’s only 9 I would not do any exercise with him. He’s a young kid just got out there and play ball.

Although there is this one extremely difficult but effective thing for niners… PLAY CATCH.

[quote=“empty”]My young pitcher is only 9. I don’t want him lifting weights yet. However, are there certain other activities, games, etc. that would you suggest to achieve similar benefits for the younger guys?

Thanks,
Mike[/quote]

It’s kind of funny, but the old school Soviet strength coaches that worked with the nearly unbeatable USSR Olympic teams said that it did not benefit a young athlete to begin strenuous work at a young age. They had their athletes compete in a broad spectrum of sports in order to build a variety of different motor skills (and avoid muscular imbalances). It was not until 13 or 14 that athletes were trained specifically for a certain sport. So, I’d see if there were any other sports or activities that your son wants to try. Basketball and soccer seasons are coming up, both of which would add beneficial motor skills.

Thanks guys. He already plays travel soccer and basketball, along with flag football, tennis and swimming.

I was just curious if there were some particular drills, exercises or games (which is how I like to teach the kids, they never see it coming) that might be good to incorporate into a practice or what not that would help pitching strength specifically.

Steve’s recent email newsletter spurred my question, particularly with respect to the push/pull ratio. I found that quite interesting and started thinking about how much more pushing stuff kids do as opposed to pull stuff. That’s all.

If you have any ideas, let me know. The only one I have so far is tug of war and that gets old after a while.

Mike

Monkey bars would be a good one for pulling. Rope climbing is also really good, especially if you have a mid-size tree in the back yard. Not sure if your son would be tall enough (or you might look for a smaller wheelbarrow), but if he is then you can have wheelbarrow races with varying levels of weight on board. This is actually really fun, plus you can participate with your son to get some exercise.

Other things - rock climbing (look around you can find places with indoor walls), peg board (probably too difficult for him right now, though), various obstacle course stuff (check out american gladiator or ninja warrior for fun ideas).