Excercises/Stretches for front shoulder tighteness


#1

Hi,

I was looking for some good exercises/stretches for the front of the shoulder… I threw for the first time this year, 2 innings - arm felt great!! But, ever since then I have tightness/slight pain in the front of my shoulder… this past Sunday I couldn’t pitch, since it wouldn’t go away and wasn’t allowing my to throw hard - as soon as my arm went into external rotation…

I already do the Pitchers Ten exercises or Throwers Ten, but looking for others to hopefully help it go away…

Should I be trying to just throw through it? I’ve been throwing, but it hasn’t allowed my to go all out…

Thanks,
Lee


#2

Pain should be a warning light. I wouldn’t try to throw though pain. Stiffness or tightness could be a number of things. Are you warming up well before throwing (dynamic warmups, not stretches)?

I’d stop doing the shoulder exercises until you figure out the problem.


#3

[quote=“kc86”]Pain should be a warning light. I wouldn’t try to throw though pain. Stiffness or tightness could be a number of things. Are you warming up well before throwing (dynamic warmups, not stretches)?

I’d stop doing the shoulder exercises until you figure out the problem.[/quote]

kc86, thanks for the response… I probaly didn’t warm up as much as I should have - especially at my age… When you say dynamic warmups - what do you mean by that? What are some examples?

I had my shoulder checked out prior to the season, and according to the Dr. there was no major problems w/rotator cuff or labrum - only signs of tendonits in the shoulder… I think its something I have to deal with, whether its more time, or stretching/exercising

Thanks,
Lee


#4

Lee,

Google “dynamic warm-up” and you’ll get lots of hits.

Basically, a dynamic warm-up involves movement whereas the old static stretching that many people continue to do (e.g. holding one arm across the front of the body with the other arm) involves no movement and, therefore, cannot really warm you up. Warm-ups should be about raising the core temperature as connective tissue is more pliable - and, therefore, more immune to injury - when it is warm. Furthermore, stretching is being shown to possibly impair performance for certain sports or activities.


#5

[quote=“Roger”]Lee,

Google “dynamic warm-up” and you’ll get lots of hits.

Basically, a dynamic warm-up involves movement whereas the old static stretching that many people continue to do (e.g. holding one arm across the front of the body with the other arm) involves no movement and, therefore, cannot really warm you up. Warm-ups should be about raising the core temperature as connective tissue is more pliable - and, therefore, more immune to injury - when it is warm. Furthermore, stretching is being shown to possibly impair performance for certain sports or activities.[/quote]

Excellent, thanks for the info Roger! I’ll check it out - I’ve never warmed-up in this fashion, its always been your normal stretches as your suggest and some running…


#6

[quote=“Roger”]Lee,

Google “dynamic warm-up” and you’ll get lots of hits.

Basically, a dynamic warm-up involves movement whereas the old static stretching that many people continue to do (e.g. holding one arm across the front of the body with the other arm) involves no movement and, therefore, cannot really warm you up. Warm-ups should be about raising the core temperature as connective tissue is more pliable - and, therefore, more immune to injury - when it is warm. Furthermore, stretching is being shown to possibly impair performance for certain sports or activities.[/quote]
Yep, performance goes down and the possibility of injury actually goes up.


#7

[quote=“kc86”]
Yep, performance goes down and the possibility of injury actually goes up.[/quote]

That’s intersting, I’m not that old… but it must be a relatively new idea - to warm up in that fashion…

I did find about 10 dynamic exercises, I tried them out - it was actually quit a little workout - felt good after it though, like everything was ready to go…

Thanks,
Lee