Everything About Workouts


#1

At this point my baseball season is over. Right now I’m looking to build the perfect workout. I love starting off my workouts with a good thirty minute run which usually equals out to be about three and a half miles for me. Running is something I have always love to do and it helps me get energized for my workout. My head is so packed full of information that I have read from this site and many others regarding lifting and core work and strengthening of the body in general. I see some posts with guys only doing about 5 lifts in a day then I read some with guys doing over 50 lifts a day. I’ve also read that strengthening your core is good if done after running so I try to put core work after my run. I’m looking for any kind of advice whether it be actual exercises to add or take away, to change reps, to change sets, to take away doing core everyday, to run more/less. Out of this post I’m looking to learn as much as I can so I can apply to lifting and how I think and go about lifting. Anything dealing with the sciences of it or anything like that is appreciated. I’m looking to get as knowledgeable as possible. If you have any good articles or insight regarding things or any good websites to relay to me all of it is a big help. I want this to be a big think tank of information for myself and others. Critique and you can be as blunt as you like. Thank you in advance.

Who I am:

I’m Dave. I’m going into my sophmore year in high school. I’m 6 feet tall weighing 165 pounds.

My Workout:

Day 1: Monday/Wednesday

Running-30 Minutes

Core

Swiss Ball Crunch- 3 x 10
Swiss Ball Oblique Crunch- 3 x 10
Planks-5 x 30 seconds
Captain’s Chair-3 x 10
Bicycles-3 x 10
Leg Raises-3 x 10

Shoulders

Lat Raises-3 x 10
Vertical Press-8,6,4
Front Raises-3 x 10

Triceps

Pushups-Failure x 3
Tricep Extension-3 x 10
Dips-3 x 10

Legs

Medicine Ball Squats- 3 x 10
Squats-10,8,4,2
Lunges-3 x 10
Calf Raises-3 x 10

Day 2: Tuesday/Thursday

Running-30 Minutes

Core

Swiss Ball Crunch- 3 x 10
Swiss Ball Oblique Crunch- 3 x 10
Planks-5 x 30 seconds
Captain’s Chair-3 x 10
Bicycles-3 x 10
Leg Raises-3 x 10

Biceps

Concentration Curls-3 x 10
Standing Barbbell Curls-3 x 10
Preacher Curls-3 x 10

Forearms

Rope Twists-5 twists and down
Wrist Curls-3 x 10
Reverse Wrist Curls-3 x 10

Chest

Dumbbell Flys-3 x 10
Bench-10,8,4,2


#2

Well, two things you can completely eliminate would be tricep extensions and all of the bicep curls. “Curls are for the girls,” they dont need to be worked in isolation. I’d do more dips, maybe 5 sets, instead of the tri extensions. In place of the bicep excercises, go with some chinups or pullups.

Another thing, you have no back exercises listed. Pullups or rows would be good for the upper back. Deadlifts are good for the lower back.

Finally, I think some form of explosiveness should be added, even if it is just one exercise per session. Instead of regular pushups, do clap pushups. Jump squats rather than medicine ball squats. Tuck jumps, burpees, the options are endless.


#3

I have truly found a love in exercise science, physiology, biomechanics, and training in general. I may very well be making it a career path down the road.

That being said I have done lots of reading.

I’ve come across many great resources, almost everything has some value, but some have far more value in them then others.

You will find for almost any question you have you can find an answer, and then probably a dozen more. This is why there are great all in one manuals, they simplify things and take the guesswork out of programming, your just going to have to cough up some cash.

If you take the time to read, the internet has become a great source of knowledge. Most of the well known trainers write A LOT. They will often include some endorsement to their own products but all and all they are extremely informative.

A lot of guys will respond to your emails if you have a few simple questions. They were all aspiring athletes at some point, and it’s salemanship too.

In the reading you will find things are geared towards different things. Athletes, bodybuilding, out of shape people, ect, but you can almost always take useful information away from the reading.

My favorite places for information (most of these are in my bookmarks toolbar haha)
Some of the following are conglomerations of different authors writings, others are sole sites of one person.

You will also find each person has a different style, some prefer certain lifts, some lean towards brute strength and force, some prefer to be corrective to balance out posture and such, some are all about the prehab.
I find it’s best to take something from everyone rather than everything from one. That’s just me.

Joe Defranco- defrancostraining.com (This man has some of the most amazing results for athletic improvement of anyone)

Eric Cressey- ericcressey.com and http://ericcressey.blogspot.com/
He recently posted a newspaper article about 4 of his clients who all played baseball at the same school. One of them was a lefty that gained like 8 mph going into his senior year, he wasn’t going to play college, but after his offseason he will be.

Mike Robertson- http://www.robertsontrainingsystems.com/articles.html

John Berardi- http://johnberardi.com/articles/index.htm
This man really knows nutrition. What I loved the most about his resources is he was actually a skinny guy. I find a lot of guys think they know all this stuff about how to get stronger and bigger, but they were big all the time. Berardi tells it like it is.

Elitefts- http://www.elitefts.com/articles/Current-Articles/default.asp
Conglomeration of writers, a lot is powerlifting specific yet there is so much great information from some of the most experienced individuals int he field.

T-nation - http://www.t-nation.com
Conglomeration of writers. There’s lots about body building and just looking good, but there are SO MANY ARTICLES on the site you could read for days about sports enhancement.

If you would like to look up studies on anything in the world of sports, this is a great spot to find abstracts and even whole studies.
http://nsca.allenpress.com/nscaonline/?request=search-simple

Learning from studies will help you apply knowledge.

There’s tons of more great trainers out there, heck I know I’m leaving out some guys that I probably read today.

You will also find most of the top guys in the industry don’t do tons of marketing like most of the gimicky fitness industry, they get results and their business grows.

Also many of what I would consider the top guys are “networked” and refer to eachother a lot. They do roundtable discussions, and seminars with some of the brightest minds around, so I mean collaboration makes sense to me.

The list goes on an on really, again this is why the all in one manuals are so handy, guys take their years of experience and knowledge and put it into one spot.

Good luck man, reach for the stars!

Hope I didn’t make things more confusing with this long post.

I could probably make a list of some of my favorite articles if you would be interested.


#4

[quote=“kc86”]Well, two things you can completely eliminate would be tricep extensions and all of the bicep curls. “Curls are for the girls,” they dont need to be worked in isolation. I’d do more dips, maybe 5 sets, instead of the tri extensions. In place of the bicep excercises, go with some chinups or pullups.

Another thing, you have no back exercises listed. Pullups or rows would be good for the upper back. Deadlifts are good for the lower back.

Finally, I think some form of explosiveness should be added, even if it is just one exercise per session. Instead of regular pushups, do clap pushups. Jump squats rather than medicine ball squats. Tuck jumps, burpees, the options are endless.[/quote]

I also forgot to note KC’s got some great posts on the site here too.


#5

[quote=“centerfield2150”]I have truly found a love in exercise science, physiology, biomechanics, and training in general. I may very well be making it a career path down the road.

I could probably make a list of some of my favorite articles if you would be interested.[/quote]

I feel the same way about exercise science. I could read for hours on it and about it and I feel like there’s always more to learn and study. About five months ago I got really deep into it and read things everyday. It helped me lose thirty five pounds which helped my mechanics and overall health which helped me have the best season of my life. And about some of your favorite articles. I’d gladly see them and learn from them.


#6

I read alot in recent days that isolation lifts are bad and some people consider them a waste of time. Is it alright to incorporate some in a workout and I know some of the main full body lifts are…

Pullups
Deadlifts
Bench
Rows
Squats
Dips

but is there anything else to add into a workout as in full body lifts. And with explosive training. In a recent post KC said to add some to my workout. How many do you think I should supplement to my workout. I know you said even one would help but how many would you truly recommend and what are some of the specific things you do with them as in reps and sets?


#7

I apologize if I’m coming across as a pest with all these questions but it seems the deeper I get into this stuff the more differing opinions I find.

A couple more questions

  1. How many sets/muscle group do you guys like to have during a week?

  2. With core work: How many days should I work on it in a week?

  3. Is it sufficient to only work a muscle group once a week.

  4. How long does it take for muscles to regenerate and get stronger, that could answer some of my other questions.

I appreciate all the help I’ve been getting and in no way do I mean to be a bother.

Thanks
Dave


#8

That’s a starter list of stuff that will give you a vary broad base of knowledge, these articles have basically zero filler and/or sales pitch.
These authors are at the top of their field, and know their stuff.

Some of my favorite articles;

50 Tips for Serious Athletes by Jeremy Frisch, simply things worth knowing;

http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=06-191-training

The entire squat power series, they link into eachother;

http://prosource.net/article-squat-power-pt6.jsp

Defranco’s West Side for Skinny ******* article;

http://www.defrancostraining.com/articles/articles.htm

21st Century core training by Mike Robertson (this should answer questions in regard to core training;

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459822

Periodization of Training, Louie Simmons possibly the greatest training coach for powerlifting, ever;
I can’t direct link but it’s a November 2006 Article here;
http://www.westside-barbell.com/articles.htm

Basically everything on that page is worth reading, but there are some other notables at that location;

Explosive Leg Strength (Nov 06); More on the Conjugate Method: principle of variety (Aug 04); Things you should know (June 06)

10 Training Myths exposed, Joe Defranco, explains why common training thought processes are wrong;

http://www.defrancostraining.com/articles/archive/articles_training-myths.htm

High Octane Training by Charlie Francis, it isn’t specific but it answers a host of questions that I’m sure you’ve thought and wondered about;

http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=body_128high

The truth about Leg-extensions, although you may not agree with the complete ideas put forth it creates some provoking thought;

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1306675

Eat my meat, part I & II by Dave Tate, basically a list of great points, put forward by one of the most experienced guys around;

http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=07-068-training
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=07-072-training


#9

[quote=“ltownindians07”]I apologize if I’m coming across as a pest with all these questions but it seems the deeper I get into this stuff the more differing opinions I find.

A couple more questions

  1. How many sets/muscle group do you guys like to have during a week?

  2. With core work: How many days should I work on it in a week?

  3. Is it sufficient to only work a muscle group once a week.

  4. How long does it take for muscles to regenerate and get stronger, that could answer some of my other questions.

I appreciate all the help I’ve been getting and in no way do I mean to be a bother.

Thanks
Dave[/quote]

I think you can decern this from the various articles I linked you to, but I’ll give you some moderately direct answers.

This is general to all questions; lagging muscle groups deserve more attention including more reps and sets, if your core is lagging give it more attention.

  1. Sets vary entirely by intensity and percentage of one rep max.
    Generally it’s best to use a cycling of the reps/sets/goals of a lift.

It’s about using all of these properly;

Maximum effort (low reps for many sets, high percent 1RM)
These are great for the big lifts, but if you do the same movement over time they will burn out your CNS.

Dynamic effort (3-8 reps between 40-60% 1RM) The goal is to move the weight as fast as possible)
This is often used on the big lifts when you aren’t using max effort on that specific lift. By increasing your speed you aid in increasing your raw strength. And will increase your explosiveness.

Repetition effort (8-12 reps, some suggest up to 20 reps) The goal is to stress the muscles to induce hypertrophy. This works well on the 2nd upper body day, and lower body auxileries.

All of these must tie together.

ME is the pure strength without it you will never get as much pure strength as possible.
DE is used to increase the speed of your lifts. Without this you will burn out your CNS because maximum effort is so taxing. Also DE creates the explosive power that is important in driving through the weight in training. It can’t be used purely without ME as your ceiling won’t get very high and you’ll cap out sooner than you should have.
RE is used to help increase muscle size. Larger muscles are more capable of moving heavier weights with increased strength and speed.

  1. The core can be directly trained a couple times per week, generally upper body day is less taxing on it so it works well at the end of that. If your doing heaving compound lifts your core is already activated plenty. It’s supplemental.

  1. I do not think any normal person should be training a muscle only once weekly. They’re robbing themselves of results.
    Bodybuilders do this type of workout as they are on streriods and drugs and can do insane amounts of isolated reps and sets and still recover.

Regular people do better by hitting it twice a week without as much volume per session.

Alwyn Cosgrove is a big opponent of regular people doing body part splits, as well as many other trainers. If you look up Alwyn’s articles you should find some great explanations to your question.

  1. The time taken to regenerate varies depending on so many factors;

Sets, reps, intensity, DIET, sleep, hormonal factors such as stress.
Generally 72 hours should be more than sufficient if your on a upper lower split. However, Louie Simmons talks about guys box squatting three or more times a week beccause of the nature of the exercise. There are people that do pullups and/or pushups daily and still pergress.

As far as getting stronger, I’ve read something over and over you may find interesting.

During the 4-6 week cycle of exercise you arne’t really becoming significantly stronger. It’s the week of deloading that allows your body to catch back up and make all the gains it has been primed to achieve.

I feel this to be true, I hadn’t seen noticable velocity change from my training (although if you are constantly throwing one wouldn’t notice small progressions anyways).
I took my deloading week and then pitched on Saturday. My catcher was shocked at my velocity. It was noticably harder, the only thing I can think of that attributes to the jump would the deloading week as I’m not sleeping well lately and my diet hasn’t been great.
I can’t wait to get under the bar and see where my lifts are at.


#10

Jon Doyle also has some interesting views on baseball training at www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com he is a big believer in compund lifts and olympic lifts such as power clean and power snatch. His articles have good information but they all seem to end up giving a link to one of his products. But with the articles on the left side and then his blog (top right corner) has some good information.


#11

Doyle does a good job of leading on your interest with his articles.
He often doesn’t give an actual answer to what you should be doing, he describes the answer or tells you what you are doing wrong. To find the complete answer he is forcing you to by his products.


#12

Yeah that’s true, do you think his products seem worth it? I’m stuck right now on what program i should use not just jon doyle’s but others like tuff cuff. Thing is is that i play in the field when im not pitching so i need to work on speed and quickness for the field and on basepaths as well as power for hitting. What do you recommend? Any others would be great too, i’ve been looking around the internet so much it’s just tough to find one with everything i’d like, that also shows when and how much to do on what days etc. Sorry to bother you guys about this heh :confused:


#13

Alright guys, I’ll come to you about this. I want a workout that can be considered a good one to help with physical appearance and will translate into a great baseball workout also. I read so many things and they all are contradicting. I would like to develop great core strength and develop definition in my abdominals (btw I know that your core isn’t just your abs). I would also like to develop a little more definition in my pecs.

My Questions:

  1. What are some workouts you do or have done that work?

  2. What kind of set/reps did you do and how often did you mix them up.

  3. Do you do or have you done a split and if so how did you break the split down and how many days was it.

I’ll look at everything included in your workout. I would just like to see some that other people tend to run and what kind of success you’ve had with them.

Thanks for everything so far guys, especially you centerfield all your articles and resources are great and they’ve been great reads and have taught me alot.


#14

Infinite Intensity is one of the most balanced programs you will find. Lots of strength work, conditioning, etc.

Check out this video to see the type of training Ross does: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57pv_1j4dH0&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rosstraining.com%2Farticles%2Fhardcore.html


#15

[quote=“ltownindians07”]Alright guys, I’ll come to you about this. I want a workout that can be considered a good one to help with physical appearance and will translate into a great baseball workout also. I read so many things and they all are contradicting. I would like to develop great core strength and develop definition in my abdominals (btw I know that your core isn’t just your abs). I would also like to develop a little more definition in my pecs.

My Questions:

  1. What are some workouts you do or have done that work?

  2. What kind of set/reps did you do and how often did you mix them up.

  3. Do you do or have you done a split and if so how did you break the split down and how many days was it.

I’ll look at everything included in your workout. I would just like to see some that other people tend to run and what kind of success you’ve had with them.

Thanks for everything so far guys, especially you centerfield all your articles and resources are great and they’ve been great reads and have taught me alot.[/quote]
Physical appearance is basically just lose fat and gain muscle (hypertrophy). Both of those things have a lot to do with your eating. This site is helpful for bodybuilder/ physical appearance type questions: www.johnstonefitness.com

As for the rest…

  1. Too many to name. I like certain trainers more than others (Enamait and DeFranco are very good). Right now I am on the 50 day routine in Never Gymless (Enamait). The results have been amazing, both in strength and conditioning.

  2. Sets reps are related to the goal. If you want hypertrophy then I would go more reps, 10 to 12. Optimum gains in max strength I would go much lower, 4 or 5. The best way is to keep things in constant variation. So, if I do 5x5’s of really heavy deadlifts, then I might back off and do a 3x12 of military presses or something else. You dont want to go too stressful with tons of really heavy lifts, and at the same time you donot want to turn into a bodybuilder. There is a balance you’ll need to maintain.

  3. I have done upper/lower, 3 day fullbody, and then an assortment of more complicated stuff. Out of these, the 3 day fullbody was most effective (imo). Right now I am working out 4 days, then resting one (2 strength days, 1 circuit day, and one interval training day). This is my new favorite.


#16

Has anyone tryed this medicine ball routine by Tom House:

http://www.jumpusa.com/psysbase.htm