Elbow pain


#1

Is it normal to have a pain on your inner elbow after throwing? I’ve had it nearly every year since I was 12/13 after throwing. I hurt my arm when I was 12 and thought it may be because of that.


#2

If your having elbow trouble swim but only do breast stroke , use y our elastics but more importantly do yoga. no its not normal


#3

How are your mechanics??? Have someone video tape you or record you, then analyze them, or post them on the website for critique. What kind of exercises do you do? You may just be putting too much stress on your elbow and throwing too often while working out real heavy… And do you exercise before you go and pitch??? I don’t see the point in doing yoga to relieve elbow pain…If there is a way, someone post what movements you should put emphasis on…

It may just have to with your mechanics, and how serious was your arm injury at age 12? Change things up, and stop throwing for a couple of weeks… And what pitches do you throw? Use a heat pad, and ice your elbow for about 20 minutes… If pain persists, it may be time to see a doctor… But all in all, your mechanics may need work…

Frank


#4

[quote=“nd943”]Is it normal to have a pain on your inner elbow after throwing? I’ve had it nearly every year since I was 12/13 after throwing. I hurt my arm when I was 12 and thought it may be because of that.[/quote]My son (15 now) had a real problem with pain on his “inner elbow” about 3 years ago which caused him to miss an entire season of pitching. He was diagnosed as having “golfer’s elbow”, medial epicondylitis, to be technical. Golfer’s elbow is pretty much the same as “tennis elbow” just on the inside of the elbow.

It’s inflammation of the tendon that attaches a muscle(s) of the forearm to the medial epicondyle, the bony protrusion on the inside of the elbow end of the upper arm bone (humerus). I’m no physician but I’d go see one immediately. The treatment included a lot of physiotherapy and a year off from pitching.

The cause is a bit more difficult to pinpoint. After all of this, I believe that it’s because of his grip on the ball. I noticed that his thumb had been up the side of the ball as opposed to being directly under the ball and the fingers on top. He ended up putting a “slilder” motion into his pitches. Changing his grip made a big difference in the activity of that muscle and it’s affect on the tendon.

I don’t know if this is what you have but it’s one theory. See a good physician.


#5

“Is it normal to have a pain on your inner elbow after throwing? I’ve had it nearly every year since I was 12/13 after throwing. I hurt my arm when I was 12 and thought it may be because of that.”

No, it’s not.

It may be the sign of a serious problem.

First of all, how old are you?

Second, what do you mean that you hurt your arm when you were 12?


#6

“My son (15 now) had a real problem with pain on his “inner elbow” about 3 years ago which caused him to miss an entire season of pitching. He was diagnosed as having “golfer’s elbow”, medial epicondylitis, to be technical. Golfer’s elbow is pretty much the same as “tennis elbow” just on the inside of the elbow.”

Medial epicondylitis is actually worse than you describe.

What happened is that he was putting more load on his elbow that it could stand. However, since he was 13 and likely still has an open growth plate, rather than the tendon being damaged, what was damaged (or at least irritated) was the bone to which the tendon attached. The force that was being applied to the elbow was trying to pull the medial epicondyle off of the humerus. Do this enough, and the medial epicondyle will pull off of the bone and have to be surgically reattached.

“The cause is a bit more difficult to pinpoint. After all of this, I believe that it’s because of his grip on the ball. I noticed that his thumb had been up the side of the ball as opposed to being directly under the ball and the fingers on top. He ended up putting a “slilder” motion into his pitches. Changing his grip made a big difference in the activity of that muscle and it’s affect on the tendon.”

It didn’t have anything to do with where his thumb was. Instead, the problem was A) how much he was throwing and B) how he was throwing. By how he was throwing, I mean what his wrist was doing.

When they said he was putting a “slider” motion on his pitches, they meant that he was supinating his wrist (turning it clockwise) as he released the ball. This would focus the load on the ligaments of the elbow (and the bones to which they attach). To fix the problem, you have to pronate (turn the wrist counter-clockwise) as you accelerate the arm and release the ball. This shifts some of the load onto the Pronator Teres muscle and some of the bony structure of the elbow.


#7

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Medial epicondylitis is actually worse than you describe.

What happened is that he was putting more load on his elbow that it could stand. However, since he was 13 and likely still has an open growth plate, rather than the tendon being damaged, what was damaged (or at least irritated) was the bone to which the tendon attached. The force that was being applied to the elbow was trying to pull the medial epicondyle off of the humerus. Do this enough, and the medial epicondyle will pull off of the bone and have to be surgically reattached.[/quote]
Actually, xrays did not show any growth plate issues. The docs and physios were in agreement that it was inflammation of the tendon only.


#8

I’m 15 now and after pitching in a game when I was 12 i had a pain in my inner elbow. It was really bad and i couldn’t throw at all so i went to see a doctor. He just said my tendons weren’t developed and were being stretched when I throw so i should do some lifting exercises to make my arm stronger. (this wasnt a sports doctor or anything). The pain is nothing like it used to be, but I can still feel it after/during the time I pitch.


#9

“I’m 15 now and after pitching in a game when I was 12 i had a pain in my inner elbow. It was really bad and i couldn’t throw at all so i went to see a doctor. He just said my tendons weren’t developed and were being stretched when I throw so i should do some lifting exercises to make my arm stronger. (this wasnt a sports doctor or anything). The pain is nothing like it used to be, but I can still feel it after/during the time I pitch.”

And people wonder why my respect for doctors often wavers…

This is a complete misdiagnosis and terrible advice. You need to find someone who knows what they are talking about.

For one thing, at age 12 lifting weights is problematic and certainly not a panacea. The reason is that the weakness in this part of your elbow at the age of 12 is the growth plate, not the tendon. At this age, and still at age 15, your tendons and ligaments are stronger than is the cartilage that makes up your growth plate. At this age, if you lift weights you run the risk of increasing the likelihood that you will injure yourself rather than decreasing it (because then your muscles will be even stronger than your growth plates).

How often do you throw? How often do you pitch? How many months of the year do you play baseball.

If you were my son I would shut you down (from pitching at least) until I knew what was going on. You could be permanently and irreparably damaging your elbow.

THIS IS A BIG DEAL. DON’T BLOW IT OFF.


#10

i also have this problem. After i pitch a game my inner elbow aches. Is this the same problem you’re having? or does it just hurt? And if any moderators could comment on my post i would appreciate it and tell me what i am doing wrong


#11

First of all, how old are you?


#12

15


#13

Exactly where is the pain relative to the bony bump on the inside of your elbow?

You need to be careful. At age 15, the growth plate of your Medial Epicondyle may or may not still be open. If so, they you could be risking a serious injury.

Do you pay attention to warming up slowly and carefully or do you just get up on the mound on day 1 and start bringing it?


#14

If you are interested in preventing medial (inner) elbow pain, then you might want to read this article that I just posted over in the Pitching Mechanics area…


#15

thanks for the article, hopefully it will help me to not have elbow pain this year.


#16

Chris,
I noticed on your site that you have a section on your pitching analyes that have pitchers with elbow problems such as Eric Gagne, Mark Prior, and A.J. Burnett. Are these guys having the same problems that i am having with my elbow? Where it is aching in the middle part of the elbow or do you even know what is hurting them? I was looking at the pictures of the pitchers mechanics and noticed most of them are showing the ball to the center fielder. Does this put more stress on the elbow than showing it to 3rd base? Anyway i just wanted to know how these guys are handling their elbow problem and if it is the same as mine
Thanks, :wink:


#17

[quote=“longhorn”]Chris,
I noticed on your site that you have a section on your pitching analyes that have pitchers with elbow problems such as Eric Gagne, Mark Prior, and A.J. Burnett. Are these guys having the same problems that i am having with my elbow? Where it is aching in the middle part of the elbow or do you even know what is hurting them? I was looking at the pictures of the pitchers mechanics and noticed most of them are showing the ball to the center fielder. Does this put more stress on the elbow than showing it to 3rd base? Anyway i just wanted to know how these guys are handling their elbow problem and if it is the same as mine[/quote]

All of these guys do a variety of things that are problematic.

However, they are likely experiencing different problems because you are 15. That means that you may still have an open growth plate in your Medial Epicondyle (the bony bump on the inside of your arm).

However, if you keep doing what you’re doing, you’ll end up with serious injury problems just like they do.

As far as showing the ball to Center Field goes, the problem isn’t that it directly puts more stress on the elbow (e.g. it doesn’t put huge stress on the elbow at the moment that you are showing the ball to Center Field). Instead, the problem is that it puts the elbow in a weaker position to deal with the stress that it will experience as you start to turn your shoulders and your elbow rapidly extends 90 degrees (assuming you come to the High Cocked or L position).

I would see if you feel a difference if you show the ball to 3B instead of Center Field.

You might also want to see how you feel if, instead of having your elbow bent 90 degrees at the High Cocked position, you have it at 135 degrees (e.g. leaning back toward CF).


#18

Chris,
Do you think that it is my bone that is causing the aching? Almost everytime i pitch during/after it starts to ache. Also when i do anything with my throwing elbow it pops (Tricep Extentions, Tube exercies etc.) I have been reading alot about tennis elbow and i dont think i have that i am pretty sure it is a bone that is causing the aching. Anyways i was wondering if you can give me any suggestions. Pitching is my love but i will give it up if this elbow aching doesnt stop.


#19

[quote=“longhorn”]Chris,
Do you think that it is my bone that is causing the aching? Almost everytime i pitch during/after it starts to ache. Also when i do anything with my throwing elbow it pops (Tricep Extentions, Tube exercies etc.) I have been reading alot about tennis elbow and i dont think i have that i am pretty sure it is a bone that is causing the aching. Anyways i was wondering if you can give me any suggestions. Pitching is my love but i will give it up if this elbow aching doesnt stop.[/quote]

It depends on exactly where you are feeling the pain. Where is the pain relative to the bony bump on the inside of your elbow?

Given your screenname, do you live in Texas? If so, do you play ball year-round?

Also, the “popping” is really disturbing. Have you gone to see a doctor?

Given that you are 15, and the growth plate that holds your Medial Epicondyle to the Humerus is still open, you could be feeling the pain because your are putting excessive strain on it.

In the worst case, I wouldn’t say that you will have to give up pitching. You might just have to give it up until you are a little older and your bones have matured.