Effectively Wild


#1

One of the toughest offensive outings we had this year was against a kid who was effectively wild. He would bounce two in front of the plate. Throw one behind the batters back than come in and throw two perfect strikes. Then more times than not the last pitch would be out of the zone and we would chase for strike 3. It was very effective pitching and our batters were very off balance.

I also noticed this in our batting practice. As I throw BP I am good for about 75 pitches. Than the wheels start to come off. The first seven batters are crushing the ball. Than as I start to waiver the batting goes down hill quick. As a spray a few pitches about, than a get one over the plate and the kids wiff.

Does anyone coach this to pitchers? Does it waste to many pitches to establish being wild? Does it mess with the pitchers mechanics?

As far as batting, what’s the right mind set for this situation? What’s a good mental game to teach the kids? I always preach to anticipate a strike every pitch.


#2

i wouldn’t consider being wild a good thing but there is a difference between doing it on purpose and doing it by pure luck because you dont have an idea where its going to end up. it sure is a good strategy, if you can throw strikes consistently, to brush back hitters and make them feel like you’re wild but over doing it will raise your pitch count and tire your team that might get caught up with a liner they would have normally get a play on. the brush back pitch and the hit by pitch though are some instruments a pitcher can use and when done properly can be very effective.

i dont think air milleing one 4 feet over the ump head will do anything other than waist a pitch. ask john kruk and he’ll tell you otherwise though. haha


#3

Funny!

Wild isnt encouraged. There are plenty of other strategies you can use to intimidate and send the hitter messages, but they all require a good amount of control, poise and command.