Earned run average

Can someone explain to me in a nutshell or refer me to a site that explans how to score and compute earned and unearned runs. Thank you in advance

http://www.predictem.com/mlb/era.php

I don’t think they calculate Unerned runs, but if you want to do it for laughs I guess its the same thing as calculating ERA just u take the number of Uneraned runs and put that in for earned runs…if that makes any sense

Thanks Austin, I ask the wrong question. I know the calculation I dont know which runners are what. Does just the baserunner that the error was commited on or does any of the following hitters also count as unearned? What if there was two outs when error commited. Does all theruns that scored count as earned or unearned? Hope I make sense

OKay, so basically:

-If a batter hits a ball cleanly (a single, double, triple, and HR) and scores, than it is an earned run

-If a batter gets on by an error, walk, or is HBP, and scores, than it i an unearned run.

[quote=“Austin#34”]OKay, so basically:

-If a batter hits a ball cleanly (a single, double, triple, and HR) and scores, than it is an earned run

-If a batter gets on by an error, walk, or is HBP, and scores, than it i an unearned run.[/quote]
Walks and HBPs are earned… Aren’t they?

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers’ defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

Adjusted Pitching Runs [APR or PR/A]
(Innings Pitched divided by 9) x (League ERA - ERA)
An advanced pitching statistic used to measure the number of runs a pitcher prevents from scoring compared to the league’s average pitcher in a neutral park in the same amount of innings. This is similar to the ERA+ statistic listed below and acts as a quantitative counterpart.

Earned Run Average [era]
(Number of Earned Runs x 9) divided by (Number of Innings Pitched)
One of the oldest pitching statistics that is the most commonly used and understood in the Major Leagues today. Virtually every fan knows what it means but many often forget the formula used to compute the pitchers ERA. It originally appeared in the early 1900’s and when calculating, remember not to add those runs which scored unearned. Need to know what is & is not an Earned Run?

Earned Run Average Plus [ERA+ or RA] League ERA (divided by) ERA
This statistic uses a league normalized earned run average in the calculation and is meant to measure how well the pitcher prevented runs from scoring relative to the rest of the league. It is a similar to the hitter’s PRO statistic and when calculated the decimal is also dropped here.

Hope this is not too confusing.

I don’t think HBP count as earned runs, think they fall into the category of being walked

Yeah but walks are earned because the pitcher let them on base…

I guess if your talking in technical terms, but with ERA it is counted as unearned.

This site will explain it better than I can:

[quote=“Austin#34”]I guess if your talking in technical terms, but with ERA it is counted as unearned.

This site will explain it better than I can:


Wiki answers isn’t a reliable source for a reason. Haha

Quoted from the MLB Rule Book

"EARNED RUNS
10.18
An earned run is a run for which the pitcher is held accountable. In determining earned runs, the inning should be reconstructed without the errors (which include catcher’s interference) and passed balls, and the benefit of the doubt should always be given to the pitcher in determining which bases would have been reached by errorless play. For the purpose of determining earned runs, an intentional base on balls, regardless of the circumstances, shall be construed in exactly the same manner as any other base on balls.
(a) An earned run shall be charged every time a runner reaches home base by the aid of safe hits, sacrifice bunts, a sacrifice fly, stolen bases, putouts, fielder’s choices, balks or wild pitches (including a wild pitch on third strike which permits a batter to reach first base) before fielding chances have been offered to put out the offensive team. For the purpose of this rule, a defensive interference penalty shall be construed as a fielding chance.
(1) A wild pitch is solely the pitcher’s fault, and contributes to an earned run just as a balk.
(b) No run shall be earned when scored by a runner who reaches first base (1) on a hit or otherwise after his time at bat is prolonged by a muffed foul fly; (2) because of interference or obstruction or (3) because of any fielding error.
© No run shall be earned when scored by a runner whose life is prolonged by an error, if such runner would have been put out by errorless play.
(d) No run shall be earned when the runner’s advance is aided by an error, a passed ball, or defensive interference or obstruction, if the scorer judges that the run would not have scored without the aid of such misplay.
(e) An error by a pitcher is treated exactly the same as an error by any other fielder in computing earned runs.
(f) Whenever a fielding error occurs, the pitcher shall be given the benefit of the doubt in determining to which bases any runners would have advanced had the fielding of the defensive team been errorless.
(g) When pitchers are changed during an inning, the relief pitcher shall not be charged with any run (earned or unearned) scored by a runner who was on base at the time he entered the game, nor for runs scored by any runner who reaches base on a fielder’s choice which puts out a runner left on base by the preceding pitcher.
NOTE: It is the intent of this rule to charge each pitcher with the number of runners he put on base, rather than with the individual runners. When a pitcher puts runners on base, and is relieved, he shall be charged with all runs subsequently scored up to and including the number of runners he left on base when he left the game, unless such runners are put out without action by the batter, i.e., caught stealing, picked off base, or called out for interference when a batter-runner does not reach first base on the play. EXCEPTION: see example 7.
EXAMPLES: (1) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B grounds out, sending A to second. C flies out. D singles, scoring A. Charge run to P1.
(2) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B forces A at second. C grounds out, sending B to second. D singles, scoring B. Charge run to P1.
(3) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B singles, sending A to third. C grounds to short, and A is out at home, B going to second. D flies out. E singles, scoring B. Charge run to P1.
(4) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B walks. C flies out. A is picked off second. D doubles, scoring B from first. Charge run to P2.
(5) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. P2 walks B and is relieved by P3. C forces A at third. D forces B at third. E hits home run, scoring three runs. Charge one run to P1; one run to P2, one run to P3.
(6) P1 walks A, and is relieved by P2, P2 walks B. C singles, filling the bases. D forces A at home. E singles, scoring B and C. Charge one run to P1 and one run to P2.
(7) P1 walks A, and is relieved by P2. P2 allows B to single, but A is out trying for third. B takes second on the throw. C singles, scoring B. Charge run to P2.
(h) A relief pitcher shall not be held accountable when the first batter to whom he pitches reaches first base on four called balls if such batter has a decided advantage in the ball and strike count when pitchers are changed.
(1) If, when pitchers are changed, the count is
2 balls, no strike,
2 balls, 1 strike,
3 balls, no strike,
3 balls, 1 strike,
3 balls, 2 strikes,
and the batter gets a base on balls, charge that batter and the base on balls to the preceding pitcher, not to the relief pitcher.
(2) Any other action by such batter, such as reaching base on a hit, an error, a fielder’s choice, a force-out, or being touched by a pitched ball, shall cause such a batter to be charged to the relief pitcher.
NOTE: The provisions of 10.18(h)(2) shall not be construed as affecting or conflicting with the provisions of 10.18(g).
(3) If, when pitchers are changed, the count is
2 balls, 2 strikes,
1 ball, 2 strikes,
1 ball, 1 strike,
1 ball, no strike,
no ball, 2 strikes,
no ball, 1 strike,
charge that batter and his actions to the relief pitcher.
(i) When pitchers are changed during an inning, the relief pitcher shall not have the benefit of previous chances for outs not accepted in determining earned runs.
NOTE: It is the intent of this rule to charge relief pitchers with earned runs for which they are solely responsible. In some instances, runs charged as earned against the relief pitcher can be charged as unearned against the team.
EXAMPLES: (1) With two out, P1 walks A. B reaches base on an error. P2 relieves P1. C hits home run, scoring three runs. Charge two unearned runs to P1, one earned run to P2.
(2) With two out, P1 walks A and B and is relieved by P2. C reaches base on an error. D hits home run, scoring four runs. Charge two unearned runs to P1, two unearned runs to P2.
(3) With none out, P1 walks A. B reaches base on an error. P2 relieves P1. C hits home run, scoring three runs. D and E strike out. F reaches base on an error. G hits home run, scoring two runs. Charge two runs, one earned, to P1. Charge three runs, one earned, to P2. "

If a batter is walked and comes around to score it’s an earned run.

did you not just read that whole thing…actually you didnt have to, its in the first section!

Would you like me to pull up an example from last night’s games?

What from the Mets game last night, yeah he scored a run but it wasnt an earned run

No, the Sox Padres game. I think it was Ellsbury that walked, and he got around to score and that was their only run of the game. Which was counted as earned.

Bowden (the guy who walked the batter) had a 1.32 ERA before the game started, now he has a 1.29 ERA, it doesnt count as an earned run

http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/gameday/index.jsp?gid=2011_06_22_sdnmlb_bosmlb_1&mode=box

[quote=“Austin#34”]Quoted from the MLB Rule Book

EXAMPLES: b P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B grounds out, sending A to second. C flies out. D singles, scoring A. Charge run to P1[/b].
(2) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B forces A at second. C grounds out, sending B to second. D singles, scoring B. Charge run to P1.
(3) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B singles, sending A to third. C grounds to short, and A is out at home, B going to second. D flies out. E singles, scoring B. Charge run to P1.
(4) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. B walks. C flies out. A is picked off second. D doubles, scoring B from first. Charge run to P2.
(5) P1 walks A and is relieved by P2. P2 walks B and is relieved by P3. C forces A at third. D forces B at third. E hits home run, scoring three runs. Charge one run to P1; one run to P2, one run to P3.
(6) P1 walks A, and is relieved by P2, P2 walks B. C singles, filling the bases. D forces A at home. E singles, scoring B and C. Charge one run to P1 and one run to P2.
(7) P1 walks A, and is relieved by P2. P2 allows B to single, but A is out trying for third. B takes second on the throw. C singles, scoring B. Charge run to P2.
(h) A relief pitcher shall not be held accountable when the first batter to whom he pitches reaches first base on four called balls if such batter has a decided advantage in the ball and strike count when pitchers are changed.
(1) If, when pitchers are changed, the count is
2 balls, no strike,
2 balls, 1 strike,
3 balls, no strike,
3 balls, 1 strike,
3 balls, 2 strikes,
and the batter gets a base on balls, charge that batter and the base on balls to the preceding pitcher, not to the relief pitcher.
(2) Any other action by such batter, such as reaching base on a hit, an error, a fielder’s choice, a force-out, or being touched by a pitched ball, shall cause such a batter to be charged to the relief pitcher.
NOTE: The provisions of 10.18(h)(2) shall not be construed as affecting or conflicting with the provisions of 10.18(g).
(3) If, when pitchers are changed, the count is
2 balls, 2 strikes,
1 ball, 2 strikes,
1 ball, 1 strike,
1 ball, no strike,
no ball, 2 strikes,
no ball, 1 strike,
charge that batter and his actions to the relief pitcher.
(i) When pitchers are changed during an inning, the relief pitcher shall not have the benefit of previous chances for outs not accepted in determining earned runs.
NOTE: It is the intent of this rule to charge relief pitchers with earned runs for which they are solely responsible. In some instances, runs charged as earned against the relief pitcher can be charged as unearned against the team.
EXAMPLES: b With two out, P1 walks A. B reaches base on an error. P2 relieves P1. C hits home run, scoring three runs. Charge two unearned runs to P1, one earned run to P2./b With two out, P1 walks A and B and is relieved by P2. C reaches base on an error. D hits home run, scoring four runs. Charge two unearned runs to P1, two unearned runs to P2.
(3) With none out, P1 walks A. B reaches base on an error. P2 relieves P1. C hits home run, scoring three runs. D and E strike out. F reaches base on an error. G hits home run, scoring two runs. Charge two runs, one earned, to P1. Charge three runs, one earned, to P2. "[/quote]

Austin,
See the bolded portion from your own post from the MLB rule book. In a simple situation with no outs reaching by walk can count as an earned run against the pitcher that walked him. Beyond the very simple situations much depends on the situation and number of outs when walked and what happens to hitters after the walk. So- sometimes a walk can result in an earned run and sometimes not.

[quote=“Austin#34”]Bowden (the guy who walked the batter) had a 1.32 ERA before the game started, now he has a 1.29 ERA, it doesnt count as an earned run


First of all, Michael Bowden didn’t walk anyone on the Padres that ended up scoring.
Second, I was talking about how Ellsbury on the Sox got around to score after being walked.

And thanks JP.