Duck footed

If you don’t know what being duck footed means it’s when you stand with your knees pointing forwards and your feet point outwards as opposed to forward. Mine aren’t that bad but they stick out at about a 45 degree angle which makes it difficult to find a comfortable spot on the rubber.

When I line the side of my foot up with the rubber my knee points on a 45 degree inwards and sort of collapses so I decided to line my knee up with the rubber and let my foot go where it wants.

Should I keep doing what I’m doing or is it possible to use this to my advantage… I realized that I can create torque so to speak when my knee is facing inwards and I force my foot to point forwards. When I put all my weight on that leg my body turns to whichever direction my knee was facing.

So if I can incorporate this into my posting leg do you think it could help me rotate faster?

Hope that all made sense. :shock:

Hum, I have a similar problem but my right foot often will point towards the inside. Its do a tumor in my hip though so its a little differnt then yours I suppose. I would suggest trying to lean to one side though that helps me :?

“Originally Posted by ratman201 View Post
Thats how I walk, it’s just a posture problem it’s not structural. Non-firing glutes + tight hip flexors & IT band usually = flat footed duck walking.”

So possible solution is learn some good stretches, more unilateral work to activate the glutes. Get a foam roll for the IT band, and it might help. Read up on this link that I just found. Might have some good info.

http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f13/bow-legged-675763/index6.html

Not disagreeing with other posts here but there’s nothing wrong with rotating the pivot foot heel away from the rubber.

I disagree. When your pivot foot turns out like that it completely blocks off your hips from rotating like they should going into landing. Watch how lincecum counter-rotates during leg lift, but his pivot foot stays firm…he’s creating a pinch between the front and back hip joints. He’s allowing tension to build up and then unloading that tension in a violent rotation of the hips into footplant. Allowing the heel to come off and the foot to “buckle” out and back towards second base takes away this solid base for the hips to rotate, and prevents you from obtaining optimal loading/unloading of the hips.

Hope that’s clear.

I angle my heel away from the rubber so my knee is facing the way my knee would face if my feet/knees/hips were normal. Does this affect the hip rotation?

So my foot is only angled to get my knee facing toward 3rd base as opposed to 1/4 ways down the 3rd base line as it does when I stand with my foot flat against the rubber.

[quote=“OffSet”]I angle my heel away from the rubber so my knee is facing the way my knee would face if my feet/knees/hips were normal. Does this affect the hip rotation?

So my foot is only angled to get my knee facing toward 3rd base as opposed to 1/4 ways down the 3rd base line as it does when I stand with my foot flat against the rubber.[/quote]

it’s really an interesting question. Either way work on correcting the severe hip tightness you have. I would try both in front of a gun and see if there’s a significant difference between the two in terms of velocity. It’s a little hard for me to visualize, but I’d say work on correcting the issue with the hip and there won’t be a question about it.

I disagree. When your pivot foot turns out like that it completely blocks off your hips from rotating like they should going into landing.[/quote]
Why does angling the foot a bit automatically block off the hips? Does every pitcher need to have their back foot exactly parallel to the rubber? Don’t different pitchers have different amounts of flexibility? I don’t think you can make your claim across the board. This is a workable tactic for pitcher with lots of flexibility who get themselves over-rotated at release point.

I’m not talking about moving the foot around during the delivery. I’m talking about a start position - the position of the foot in the starting stance.

Please define /show what being over rotated at release point means.

Shoulders past the point of being squared up to the plate.

do you have a picture of a high level thrower in this position.

No.