Drop and drive, stay tall


#1

I was wondering what pitching style would be best for me. I have heard from a college coach that tells that staying tall would be best for me. but i have also been told by some coaches hat drop and drive would be more effective. I am 6 2. Any help would be appreciated.


#2

IMO, what you do in the stride portion of the delivery is from the leg lift, you shift your weight with your middle(hips, mid-torso). This gets your momentum going towards the plate without having to push off the rubber. Pushing off the rubber will cause you problems later in the delivery by impeding your abilty to get maximum rotation from your hips/lower body. Holding your front leg up with your middle and your weight shift will carry you out to toe touch, and you will be in a much better position to have explosive rotation than by either “tall and fall” or “drop and drive”


#3

IMO, what you do in the stride portion of the delivery is from the leg lift, you shift your weight with your middle(hips, mid-torso). This gets your momentum going towards the plate without having to push off the rubber. Pushing off the rubber will cause you problems later in the delivery by impeding your abilty to get maximum rotation from your hips/lower body. Holding your front leg up with your middle and your weight shift will carry you out to toe touch, and you will be in a much better position to have explosive rotation than by either “tall and fall” or “drop and drive”


#4

There are very few MLB pitchers who actually are examples of “drop 'n drive”. Most do what bamajeff noted. They simply think of moving their front hip out. Yeah, there’s a push there. There’s no point in arguing it’s existence. It’s just not a “drop 'n drive”. Nor is it a “tall 'n fall”. Both of those are too limiting to describe complex full body motions like pitching. The push/no push argument is a waste of time and effort. Been there, many times with both sides. How do you define “push”? When do you do it? To what end?

A good term I heard once is “rotational push”. I kind of like that term. The lesson here is that it is fruitless to think of pushing off the rubber. It CAN (not “will”) lead to problems with timing and getting the upper body moving ahead too early. It CAN (not "will) lead to the hips opening too early. The most productive thought on it is to simply move the front hip and the centre of gravity out first and hard. Then think of the rotational push idea. Just rotate the core hard into landing, assisted by the back foot and leg rotating and extending. It’s the rotation that’s important here after a good sideways motion out with the front hip.