Drive leg, hips and torso


#1

MY 9 year old is learning how to pitch and I’ve never really had a drill for his problem.
He gets decent separation, BUT his drive leg does NOT come off the ground as part of his follow thru/deceleration phase. Instead it starts coming off the ground right after stride plant.
It’s like his foot, hips, shoulders and everything comes thru at the same time.
To me, I guess the drive leg coming up is just an effect of a good follow thru. Like a counter balance.

MY oldest son is a senior and is playing college ball next year. He’s also a pitcher. We are both baffled. I hope I’ve explained this correctly and someone has an idea.

Thanks
Drew


#2

It is all about strength and coordination, a nine yr old is in no way strong enough to develop the lower half in the way in which your oldest son does…it’s why the most important thing at his age is fundamentally throwing the ball in the correct way…hand behind the ball, equal and opposite…still head. He will develop properly and as he enters puberty, he will learn and understand conditioning, get the strength necessary in his core to be able to develop his lower half assisting his upper. Be more concerned with his understanding arm health, pitching in a fundamental way…don’t expect MLB or college level coordination…ain’t gonna happen…have “real” expectations…know he will have moments and let him enjoy the journey…we are here and many others will assist the journey…other athletic endeavors will assist the process…gymnastics, martial arts…even football and basketball develop those skill sets.


#3

I think I did a poor job of explaining. I really don’t care if his velocity is hard enough to “cause” the drive leg up after follow thru.
Picture this. When he throws, at foot plant/separation the whole right side of his body (arm, right hip, right shoulder AND right leg) rotates around on his stride foot to an instant “fielding position”. This will become a habit that is hard to break.
Velocity does not matter. Correct fundys do.
Hope that helps.
Thanks
Drew


#4

When the younger kid is a little older, that’s a good time for him to learn what I call “The Secret”.
I picked up on it many moons ago when I used to go to the original Yankee Stadium. I watched the pitchers, particularly the Yankees’ Big Three rotation—Reynolds, Raschi and Lopat—and I saw what they were doing and how they were doing it. Those three guys were all doing the same thing; they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion and creating a flow of energy right up through the shoulder and arm to the fingertips, thus generating more power in their pitches—and taking a lot of pressure off said extremities in the process. I saw just what they were doing, and I made a note of it so I could start working on this on my own. As I practiced this essential—and believe me, it is essential—element of good mechanics I found that I was doing exactly what those three pitchers were doing. Because I was a natural sidearmer I got the hang of it pretty quickly.
A good place to start would be the “Hershiser” drill, which aims to get the hips fully involved. It requires no special equipment, just a fence or a wall. The whole point is to get the whole body into the action, so that one doesn’t throw with just the arm! :baseballpitcher:


#5

Isolate the components, does his throwing routine begin with him taking a knee? that way you can isolate the basic throwing elements on that knee begin at equal and opposite, glove side thumb down, throwing arm up, as he rotates to throw thumb up, keeping the glove in front bring chest to glove as the ball is delivered, always throwing to a target, do this every time he warms up for 10-15 throws, then stand without going through the entire motion in the athletic position, step and throw the same thing…forms…they do it in martial arts, train the body to fundamentally deliver and it becomes the way he throws.
Re-read my post…I never mentioned velocity once…I think that guys who worry about velo in a 9 yr old need to get hooked up with an ortho cuz they will need a discount and a go to.


#6

I’d say pay attention to posture and glove arm as messing up those will often lead to early shoulder rotation. Make sure he is not trying to use his head and shoulders to create power and make sure he’s not dropping, pulling back or flying open with his glove.


#7

[quote=“jdfromfla”]Isolate the components, does his throwing routine begin with him taking a knee? that way you can isolate the basic throwing elements on that knee begin at equal and opposite, glove side thumb down, throwing arm up, as he rotates to throw thumb up, keeping the glove in front bring chest to glove as the ball is delivered, always throwing to a target, do this every time he warms up for 10-15 throws, then stand without going through the entire motion in the athletic position, step and throw the same thing…forms…they do it in martial arts, train the body to fundamentally deliver and it becomes the way he throws.
Re-read my post…I never mentioned velocity once…I think that guys who worry about velo in a 9 yr old need to get hooked up with an ortho cuz they will need a discount and a go to.[/quote]

You’re right. You did not say anything about velocity. I assumed that is what you meant by strength. :lol: My bad.
I do like the one knee drill and will look up the Hershiser drill.

Thanks Fellas.
Drew.


#8

You need to be able to visually tell the difference between a lower body power throw vs an arm throw and a lower body powered pitch vs arm pitch. For me its easier to see a full speed then slow mo.