Drills to keep hips closed and keep from flying open

i just recorded myself on my cell phone and realized my hips fly open to soon causing my arm to lag behind my body and basicly throw with just my arm.
so i need some advice, tips or drills to help me keep my hips closed untill my lead foot lands and use that torque and rotation of my hips to generate more velocity than what i already have.

you see that roger clemens clip of him throwin? if yea then take a look at his back foot as he strides, he keeps it planted, parallel to the rubber with weight on the ball of the foot. This keeps his hips closed during the stride and when he just lands. Then when he plants the foot with his hips closed he rotates them.

So don’t turn your hips or back foot until your stride foot lands. when you turn your stride foot open (pointing to home plate) your hips will open slightly but your back foot that is parallel to the rubber and planted to the ground will keep them from completely opening. Then when you land you rotate them (explode). But make sure you rotate your hips first not your foot.

[quote=“tonyjh34”]So don’t turn your hips or back foot until your stride foot lands. when you turn your stride foot open (pointing to home plate) your hips will open slightly but your back foot that is parallel to the rubber and planted to the ground will keep them from completely opening. Then when you land you rotate them (explode).[/quote]If you look at slow motion video of MLB pitchers, you will see that the heel has already come up off the rubber before the front foot lands. The statement that you don’t rotate your hips until you land has been made many times in the past but video clearly shows this isn’t the case. The hips rotate just before landing. Actually, attempting to land with them closed and the heel still down at the rubber would be a very difficult thing to do. The pros don’t do it.

if you look at video its not until the foot lands where their hip turns…they do open a bit when they rotate the stride foot open before landing but they don’t rotate the hips until they land…watch their hip right when they land and see how much more they move

(this is the same clip of roger clemens that has been posted on this site)

this clip, for example: Notice the white stripes on the side of his shorts, following these stripes are good to get an idea about how much his hips move throughout his delivery. You can see as he is striding out you don’t see them that good ESP the stripe on his right hip. as he starts to rotate his GS stride foot and land you can see it show up a little but its not until after he lands where you see the stripe (hip) rotates significantly.

[quote=“tonyjh34”]if you look at video its not until the foot lands where their hip turns…they do open a bit when they rotate the stride foot open before landing but they don’t rotate the hips until they land…[/quote]This is simply not the case.

[quote=“tonyjh34”]…watch their hip right when they land and see how much more they move[/quote]Yes, there’s more after landing. No question. To say that “…its not until the foot lands where their hip turns…” is just not accurate. The turning of the hips before landing is a key component in the kinetic chain. Check this out. It’s only one example.

DM59 has it right and that’s a good video clip to confirm what he’s saying.

Here’s another, using a different pitcher from a different angle:

Pause the clip at about 33 sec…his foot has not landed, and his hips are very significantly open.

his hips are open but they have not rotated. There is a difference. look at 0:34 and 0:35 compared to 0:33

at 0:33 you can’t even see his his back hip… he lands shortly after that then rotates his hips. At 0:34 you see his back hip rotating and at 0:35 its all about done rotating.

There is a difference between opening the hips and rotating… when he is opening his hips slightly (mid air) he is keeping his hips from rotating by keeping the back foot planted the heel is up and that is correct to do. the reason why you land with the stride foot slightly closed (pointed toward home plate at the 1 oClock position) is so you have leverage to rotate your hips.

Why is it that lincecums foot starts to drag after his foot plants?? it doesn’t drag before he plants…and you don’t see their hips fully rotated toward the plate before they land

[quote]The turning of the hips before landing is a key component in the kinetic chain. Check this out. It’s only one example.
[/quote]

one thing that happens with every pitcher is their back thigh and knee turning in as they rotate their stride foot to point toward home plate before they land. But what they also do is keep their back foot from pivoting at that same moment because that back foot keep their back hip from rotating prematurely. It’s not until they land where they rotate their hip and then let that back foot pivot.

look at clemens, nolan, even that guy you put up there even though you can’t see his back foot completely, their foot does not pivot until after they landed and rotated their hips.

Mind you we are talking about stuff that all happens in milliseconds…its a bit easier to notice in slow motion vid which we are fortunate to have…

glove side thumb down to delay hips from opening to soon.

Nice clip, DM. I like the example. Who is that pitching?

Colon

Great clip. Thank you!

yea that clip with others are on http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1914

While I agree that some hip rotation occurs into foot plant and some occurs after foot plant, it really varies from pitcher to pitcher based in large part on their flexibility. For example, in this clip of Mark Prior, he is able to open the front leg into foot plant with almost no hip rotation:

Obviously, it’s a different story for Colon as seen in the clip above.

But, regardless of this, I seriously doubt these pitchers are consciously trying to delay or keep the back foot planted as long as they can. IMHO.

Can you explain how this “leverage” works?

The back foot is what explodes the hips toward the plate. When you stride you are turning your hips but the back foot keeps them from opening so you are not throwing all arm. The reason why you keep all your weight on your back leg is for power. All the weight on the back foot will help you push/pivot that back foot to explode the hips -that have already been turning toward home plate during the stride.

Now I know the positions of pushing off vs not pushing.
First, I think there are a lot of confusion of what people are explaining. It’s like they don’t have the right vocabulary that fits in with each other.
This is how I see it…you don’t push off the mound to get a drive toward the plate (momentum)…you do push the back foot to explode the hips, then the foot will be pulled away from the mound when rotating the shoulders and really pull away at and after external rotation.

I do this and I’m telling you from my own experience the arm goes for the ride. It’s important to have your arm on it’s way or up in the high cocked position when you push off that back foot to drive the hips. If you lag/get lazy/are late with getting your arm up into the high cock postion, you get wild, the arm rushes to catch up and may even cause some stress on the shoulder.

The front foot stays pointed toward 3B during the stride (this helps keep your shoulders closed) then pointed to home plate slightly closed when landing. When you are about to land you push that back foot to drive your hips toward the plate. So then when you land, your hips would have already been in the process of rotating but not completely. Keeping the shoulders closed as much and long as possible until you land is important because when you land your stride leg gives you a firm base to rotate your torso and shoulders against.

I was doing some drills last night and I found you can turn/twist your hips during the stride…BUT you have to keep your shoulders closed, your front foot closed and your weight on the back foot parallel to the rubber. You have to ride that back leg/foot then push/piviot (something similar to hitting like “squashing the bug”) just as, and I mean the later the better, you land.

I have a quote from roger clemens:

“At times my mechanics falter when I don’t keep my front shoulder closed through my delivery. You’ve got to keep your glove-hand shoulder closed. That’s your steering wheel, and you point it right at the location of the pitch you’re throwing. Your left side is your quiet side if you are a right-handed pitcher and your right side is your power side. Any time that’s reversed and the left side becomes my power side I get real jerky and start throwing the ball all over the place” ~ Roger Clemens

Tony can you show us some video of you conciously keeping the back foot down, I can’t imagine it without it causeing some major timing issues?
To me the word or phrase that is missing here is energy transfer. At what point during the delivery have we left the back foot behind.

I already posted this vid on this site. What I’m doing here is what I am explaining.

[quote]I can’t imagine it without it causeing some major timing issues?
To me the word or phrase that is missing here is energy transfer. At what point during the delivery have we left the back foot behind.[/quote]

It doesn’t cause timing issues if you have your hand up in the “high cocked” position. The moment you decide to explode the hips/push back foot you better have your arm up in the high cock position or at least halfway there or your arm is going to be late, then you rush to catch up. The force that your hips play into the delivery is pretty strong so if you are late with getting your arm up it would be pretty tough to control.

What I noticed is when my arm is late is I tend to throw the ball high and inside to the same handed batter. When I see myself throwing high and inside I know my problem is rushing (not getting my arm up in time) then I make the adjustment and if I still throw high then I know it’s my release point.

Now the hip twist and then push off the back foot happens quick, like one right after another. You want to have it happen as late as possible without losing any weight/leverage on the back foot.

in this vid you should be able go frame by frame. You can def see how he keeps the back foot parallel to the rubber as he is striding out. You can also see his hips turning first before he pushes of the back foot. This is why strong legs are a must in pitching.

Gotta love that choo-choo bro.

lol Thomas still on the air?

You know it! I’d rather watch that than Tim Tebow crush Florida State.