Drag line

Can someone briefly explain what the drag line is, I am a bit confused about what it exactly is. Thanks

Wood this be an example?

That is definitely an example. Although I am not sure I have seen one quite like that. Normally, for a righty, it would start off someplace between straight toward the plate to 45 degrees off toward 3rd base. Very strange (to me) to see this one kicking off toward first.

Ah I see so for a lefty it should be toward 1st base… What do you mean by 45 degrees of 3b? BTW this is Huston Street who has amazing accuracy.

From what I have read, mostly here, the optimum line is a straight line from the rubber directly toward the plate, and about 2 feet long. From the clips I have seen, the actual drag line sometimes starts off not directly toward the plate, but on a line halfway between home and third base (that would be about 45 degrees). I am not sure this would be desired, but I have seen some that start in that direction.

If the drag line shown in the picture is Huston Street, we just may give that a try! :slight_smile:

So basically how would dragging your back leg give you power is it for stability? Also I noticed also players like Randy Johnson kind do not drag totally straight but at a 45 degree angle (you were right) but some like Clay Bucholz do not even drag there foot.

A good drag line is usually a good indication of strong hip rotation, essential to velocity. A pitcher with poor hip rotation will often push his foot up in the air, essentially pushing through his hip rotation.

I read something recently where Pedro Martinez has to change the laces in his shoes after every start because he rotates his hips so violently and flips his laces on his right shoe over on the ground so hard they wear out.

So a good drag line= good hip rotation and no drag line= bad hip rotation? Also does it have to go straight or can does it affect anything if your drag line is diagonal or crooked.

That’s a good question, I don’t know, maybe someone else knows. My gut would be that a diagonal line would indicate some misalignment in your linear momentum but that’s just a guess. May be dependant on arm slot as well, judging by Street’s in that picture.

The drag line is an indicator mechanical efficiency. The length is an indicator of momentum. The shape and direction are roughly an indicator of where energy was directed. Of course, having a drag line in the first place requires good mechanics and timing. Losing balance or posture can lift the back foot off the ground prematurely. So can opening up early. Having good posture and balance as well as good timing enables the back foot to stay down. But you also have to keep your head and shoulders stacked upright into release to keep the back foot down into release.

You should note that the drag line is a result of other elements of the delivery. You should NOT try to drag the back foot or make the drag line have a certain shape or direction. Use it as a measuring stick but make your adjustments elsewhere.

One final note, the drag line concept is an immature concept that is still being studied and understood.

[quote]
PostPosted: Mar 13, 2008 Post subject:
The drag line is an indicator mechanical efficiency. The length is an indicator of momentum. The shape and direction are roughly an indicator of where energy was directed. Of course, having a drag line in the first place requires good mechanics and timing. Losing balance or posture can lift the back foot off the ground prematurely. So can opening up early. Having good posture and balance as well as good timing enables the back foot to stay down. But you also have to keep your head and shoulders stacked upright into release to keep the back foot down into release.

You should note that the drag line is a result of other elements of the delivery. You should NOT try to drag the back foot or make the drag line have a certain shape or direction. Use it as a measuring stick but make your adjustments elsewhere.

One final note, the drag line concept is an immature concept that is still being studied and understood.[/quote]

Roger I noticed I do not have a drag line, so should I try to incorporate one or maybe as you explained it could be caused by opening up early or bad posture. And so if I can fix those they can potentially create the result (as you explained) which is the drag line?

If you don’t have a drag line, it certainly could mean you have one of those other flaws in which case it would be good to fix it - whatever it is. But keep in mind that although most of the top pitchers in the game have drag lines, not all do. For example, Curt Schilling does not have a drag line.

Probably the best thing you could do is post some video of yourself and let folks see if they can spot any problems that might be preventing a drag line. If not, then I wouldn’t worry about it. However, I’d be surprised if we can’t get you to have one.

Ok I will try to post a video but I live in Canada so i’ll have to wait 1 month or so unless I can get a video from indoors. Thanks Roger