Dont know how to fix it


#1

i am running into some problems in my pitching mechanics and i dont know how to fix them. i am bending my hips to the left before i let go of the ball and then when i do let go (especially on curveballs) my whole face and my shoulders go sideways sortof instead of straight on. I know what im doing is wrong but i dont know to fix it. Any ideas?

http://www.fotothing.com/cavalier22/photo/bf7df9bdcc8e162070d6ba26ac03d2e2/

http://www.fotothing.com/cavalier22/photo/b82ae07c82f6a4d4e2fdf7f8fdf8c56b/
curveball


#2

Let me ask a basic question.

Is it causing you any problems?

Are you having control problems? Are you leaving the ball up in the zone? Are you having velocity problems?


#3

Chris… look at his first picture… now that looks like “rushing” as we discussed in that other post. Look how far from perpendicular his back arm is right before he plants his foot.


#4

I agree.

The GS foot is just about to plant but the PAS forearm isn’t close to vertical.

I wouldn’t be surprised if he has problems missing up in the zone as well as shoulder problems.

Good catch.


#5

cavalier22,

At this point in your career, the posture issue is most likely a habit. You may have once had a coach that told you to throw over the top or to get on top of the ball. These cues can sometimes lead to the big lean like you have. One consequence of your posture issue is that your release point has moved back and probably up from where it could be if you maintained good posture and stayed on line with the target into release. Another possible consequence is a tendency to open up the shoulders too early and that reduces consistency and puts more wear and tear on the arm.

If you want to correct this, I would suggest starting by focusing on your head - try to keep the head upright all the way through release. It will take many reps to break the habit. Tom House says it takes about 1000 reps to break a habit and that you don’t really lose the habit - you replace it with a different habit but it will aways be there ready to bite you when you slack off.


#6

the interesting thing with this was is that i was not doing this at the start of the season. my mechanics were alright exept for that my back arm was dragging and i was buckeling my front knee and alot of my pitches were ending up higher because i wasnt really getting out front and my release point was too high. As someone posted i really never broke those two habbits i just did things differently and thought i was fixing the problem because it felt differently self conciously. I made a decision last night to just start from scratch, forget everything that my body was used to and just start with the basics and work my way up. the reason i posted this on this website is that we are going to start throwing bullpens soon and as a sophmore i am really wanting to make varsity so im trying to get a little head start on my mechanics to make a good impression and to show that ive improved… or atleast worked hard on it. you cant tell in the pictures but my right arm was actually stopping moving inbetween the time that my glove and right hand seperated and when i got into the power position. almost like i was " loading up " I just got in from throwing and ive been working on the weekends for about a month and a half and ive just been throwing about fifty percent and its really helping me realize what im doing.

Roger,
the odd thing is is that my 8th grade coach actually told me to throw 3/4 to get more movement on the ball. i asked my highschool coach and he handed me a ball and told me to throw it in the outfield and he looked at my arm angle and said thats what i should throw with… which is high 3/4 but not quite over the top… is that a good idea?

Those pictures were a " before " if i can figure out how i can try to show a video after i have been working on keeping my head still, not opening up my shoulders too early and not rushing.

i havent thrown since last week. all i have been doing is dry mechanical work in my basement… about 25 a night and today was the first time that i felt any real command with my fastball… i was still slightly bending my hips but i concentrated on keeping my nose in front of my belt a little and keeping my head straight on target and i was throwing with more accuracy.


#7

You’re thinking about this wrong.

You weren’t missing high because you weren’t getting out in front and were releasing the ball to high.

You were missing high because you were rushing, which is what caused your arm to drag.

I used to make this mistake; try to fix missing high by focusing on the release. It never worked, which I why I dug into the issue and came to understand the problem of rushing…


#8

chris,

reading this article probably makes more sense than anything ive read in a long time. Just to make sure i got the basic idea right… i should concentrate on my legs ALWAYS being in sync with my arm. and thats what i was doing wrong… rushing caused my arm to drag. i also drug my right foot a rediculously long tmie before it came up and i followed through… also from rushing?


#9

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]You weren’t missing high because you weren’t getting out in front and were releasing the ball to high.

You were missing high because you were rushing, which is what caused your arm to drag.[/quote]

Chris,
How can you be so sure about this? He may be rushing as you have defined it (I’d want to see video to be sure) but with his posture issue he’s also not getting his release point out front and down. At a minimum, I think the best you can claim is that he is suffering from either or both of these issues.

By the way, the backward lean and uphill alignment of the shoulders in one of those pictures might also be (part of) the problem.


#10

I can’t tell from the pictures you posted when you are breaking your hands. I can see that your throwing arm is quite low and behind you just before foot plant. Make sure you break your hands just as you begin to lower your plant leg from your balance point. When your plant foot lands your throwing arm should be in the high cocked position. If not, your body compensates by excessively leaning to the left to alowing your draging arm to come through.


#11

Cav:

I also noticed in your picture that the ball is facing up already before you get to the “high T” position. This could be the problem that is causing you to drag your arm. You may have fixed this already but this will cause your arm to stop like you said before. Try to move your arm in your normal arm path once with your hand facing down and again with your hand facing up. You should feel the strain that this hand placement puts on your shoulder.

Back to your original cause for this post. One way to keep your head straight is to think as if the button on your hat is connected to a clothes line that leads right to the catchers chest. If you can keep your head from slipping to the left, you will definitely have more command. Try not to let your head drop either, after you have released the ball, keep your eyes on the target the whole time.

One drill that you can do to help correct “spinning off” and/or “leaning” is to place your back foot on a chair, bench, or bucket. Start with your feet spread to about 75% of your stride length. Start with your hands in the set position, rock back a little bit to gather yourself and throw the ball to a squatting partner. As you throw the ball, make sure that you are accelerating late, throwing the ball down, and most of all bending your back. After releasing the ball, you should have the same ankle roll that you would on a mound. After your ankle rolls, keep your back foot, toes down, placed on whatever apparatus you choose to hold your foot. This drill can be done anywhere from 30 to 70 feet.


#12

When you wind-up or go from the set position , raise the stride leg knee a little more and keep the toe pointed down , stride out just a bit farther and concentrate on pointing your glove arm shoulder at the target a bit longer and " throwing your chin " at the target on release.
Good luck.
Bill :smiley:


#13

im going to try to get a video today to try and get it all to where its easier to see what it is that im doing… those pictures were from last year and ive improved some but id still like to see what you guys see if i get a video


#14

Chris,
How can you be so sure about this? He may be rushing as you have defined it (I’d want to see video to be sure) but with his posture issue he’s also not getting his release point out front and down. At a minimum, I think the best you can claim is that he is suffering from either or both of these issues.[/quote]

Based on what I’ve seen, and experienced, I think it’s more likely that his problems are related to rushing (e.g. timing problems) than posture problems.

A video would help to clear this up.


#15

This is questionable advice.

For one thing, his palm isn’t facing up. It’s more facing 3B.

You DO NOT want the palm facing down at this point because it puts you in a position of extreme pronation which then requires you to supinate the forearm to get the palm to face the target. That focuses the load on the UCL and could lead to elbow problems.

Also, the position of his arm at this point isn’t what’s causing his arm to drag. His arm is dragging because his timing off, and that’s because his lower body is moving forward faster than his upper body.


#16

cavalier22,

There is a lot of questionable advice being handed out here based partly on limited evidence in the 3 pictures you posted and based largely, apparently, on speculation about your delivery.

I commented on your obvious posture issue and the effect I know that has on release point. Beyond that, I can’t say much.

You really need to get some current video and post it.


#17

Cavalier 22;
I posted a note to you on the first page of this forum,and I just had a chance to view your slide show and I’m gonna stick with what I said in my first post to you. Also, after viewing the slide show I’d like to ad that since your a righty, pitch from the first base side of the pitchers rubber. I’m a lefty and have pitched for years. I pitch from the 3rd base side of the rubber. Suggestion: Do the “straddle the line drill” Noticed your stride foot is landing on the heel first, point the toe down on the stride to stop this. Head facing toward first base? Like I posted earlier, “throw the chin at the catchers glove” on release.
I know this stuff will help. :smiley:
Bill


#18

[quote]This is questionable advice.

For one thing, his palm isn’t facing up. It’s more facing 3B.

You DO NOT want the palm facing down at this point because it puts you in a position of extreme pronation which then requires you to supinate the forearm to get the palm to face the target. That focuses the load on the UCL and could lead to elbow problems.

Also, the position of his arm at this point isn’t what’s causing his arm to drag. His arm is dragging because his timing off, and that’s because his lower body is moving forward faster than his upper body.[/quote]

If you look to where his hand is at in his arm path, he is turning the ball over way to early. You can look at any picture, of any pitcher, and the ball will still be facing down at this point in their path. I do not understand why the ball should not be facing down or behind at this point. Look at your own pics. Scroll down to Mike Mussina and tell me why the ball is still back/down? and that is later in his arm path than Cav’s is.

I never said that his timing wasn’t off, I commented that the fact that the ball is no longer facing down may cause a delay in his mechanincs, which will result in arm drag.


#19

Pics:

http://www.ncbuy.com/shopping/posters/viewer.html?id=359263

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/photo;_ylt=AjH5IPPFuQp31mzolbPQRi2FCLcF?slug=getty-72112395cp049_alcs_game_1_d_11_53_58_pm&prov=getty

Notice the location and direction of the hand. BALL DOWN!


#20

What is your rationale behind this suggestion?