Does your team have a dedicated pitching coach?


#1

Yes/no?


#2

I’m asking because it seems like most high school teams’ assistant coaches come from a hitting background – at least at a bunch of the high schools in Massachusetts where I live. That would irritate me :slight_smile: But I think it’s probably pretty common… ??


#3

I play at a Division I school and I haven’t had a pitching coach since my sophomore year.


#4

Seriously? That’s too bad … but maybe is your head coach more of a pitching guy?


#5

Seriously? That’s too bad … but maybe is your head coach more of a pitching guy?[/quote]

When I came in as a freshman we had a pitching coach who was a great pitching coach. Unfortunately our school was a stepping stone for him to move to a bigger DI conference.

Since my sophomore year my head coach has taken over. I don’t know if this correlates but we have had 4 tommy johns and 3 rotator cuff/labrum surgeries in the past 2 years.


#6

For the last couple of years we’ve only had a head coach, a parent that would help out where he could (I would call the true assistant) and then a joker that thought he could coach come in that didn’t know squat and tried to make up stories about throwing 110 MPH from short to first.

This year however we’re getting another coach that should be an assistant he used to pitch so hopefully we’ll have a real pitching coach type of guy.

Before it would just be head coach walking around and taking a look at our bullpens and helping a little and then he’d head on over to the cage and help the hitting guys, I imagine it’s tough for him to coach a team essentially by himself. That parent a mentioned earlier did us a lot of good by holding practices when head coach had to work or something.


#7

When Ed Lopat was with the Yankees he actually doubled as an extra pitching coach for the team, in large part because he could zero in on problems that regular pitching coach Jim Turner couldn’t quite get a handle on. Lopat told me a lot of things that I was able to utilize in a similar capacity; my team didn’t have a dedicated pitching coach, but I was able to do what he did—double in brass, as it were. On days that we didn’t play I would do some work with the pitchers, and if one of them had a pitching problem I could do something to help. That might be a good idea for a team that doesn’t have a pitching coach—let one of its more experienced pitchers take on that particular task; very often it would be such a pitcher that can spot a particular problem, be it mechanical or having to do with repertoire, and get it straightened out. It would certainly be better than having a lot of Tommy John surgeries and other ailments , as was mentioned earlier. :slight_smile:


#8

My team is actually lucky enough to have a pitching only coach! While he will give advice on other parts of the game his real specialty is pitching and that’s who he is with 99% of the time. This is his first year he is coaching us…it’s too bad I’m a senior… but i think we are the only school around my area with a pitching only coach


#9

Seriously? That’s too bad … but maybe is your head coach more of a pitching guy?[/quote]

When I came in as a freshman we had a pitching coach who was a great pitching coach. Unfortunately our school was a stepping stone for him to move to a bigger DI conference.

Since my sophomore year my head coach has taken over. I don’t know if this correlates but we have had 4 tommy johns and 3 rotator cuff/labrum surgeries in the past 2 years.[/quote]

That’s pretty sad to hear that a division 1 program doesn’t have a serious pitching coach. Let me know if you have any openings! Where do I sign?


#10

I got dibs on Hammer’s leftovers.


#11

My high school head coach pitched in college - so I guess he is the pitching coach.


#12

ha, you got it pal!


#13

pitching coach?
Over here in the Netherlands we often have one or two trainer/coaches that focus their attention on the complete team…
At least… the less important/rich baseball clubs like mine :))


#14

No.

My son’s HS coach only has bullpens during tryouts. None during the season.

Pitchers don’t know who is going to start until just before game time. Relief pitchers are pulled from the position players.

Brian


#15

That often happens in the major leagues as well. The day Don Larsen pitched his perfect game, he had come to the ballpark, and when he opened his locker he found a brand new baseball in his shoe. This was third-base coach Frank Crosetti’s way of informing a particular pitcher that he was going to start the game. And so it behooves the team’s starters to be ready, because there are times when the rotation has gotten all screwed up for one reason or another. :slight_smile:


#16

Great Pitching Coach… Dedicated? That’s debatable… when he’s paying attention yes, but he teaches lots of kids, and sometimes it seems like we ain’t his focus… This is at college too…


#17

OUCH!!! Your team really should have an assistant pitching coach. I recall when Jim Turner, the Yankees’ pitching coach from 1949 through 1958, had to dp just that—and so pitcher Ed Lopat became an extra pitching coach for the Yankees. Turner worked with guys on mechanics, and Lopat dealt with all other aspects of pitching—the strategic, the psychological, you name it. And he was good—in fact, he became so well known as a pitcher who could also coach and teach that his teammates were not the only ones who would seek him out for advice and assistance.
At the very least the coach should designate one of the more experienced pitchers on your team as an assistant. That would take some of the stress and strain off the poor guy. 8) !!


#18

Son is only a freshman at the school but I know that they do have an assistant who is a pitching coach. He pitched in college and was a pitching coach at some smaller DII and DIII schools. The new freshman head coach was a former MLB pitcher for the Reds in the 90’s…John Roper. So I would think he will work a lot with the freshman pitchers.


#19

no at least not in my little league. but my travelball coach knows a lot about pitching and batting. he played professional japanese baseball.