Does Tim Lincicum have good mechanics

The guy is like 170 pounds but he has a great fastball and seems to strike everyone out. He has well, Weird Mechanics my question is are his mechanics good and will he have a high risk of injury later in his career.

I could link you to 1,000,000,000 threads about this, but I’ll just answer. He has unorthodox mechanics that work because he is so athletic and flexible, but if you take off the cover it shows that he stays closed, gets the most out of his lower body, etc. For more:

http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=5833

his mechanics arent wierd they just arent common
they only thing unusual that he does is hop off the mound

:shock: I agree with Kelvin :shock: :smiley: :smiley:

Well also striding 127% of your body height (87% is the norm) is a bit uncommon.

[quote=“kelvinp”]his mechanics arent wierd they just arent common
they only thing unusual that he does is hop off the mound[/quote]

he doesnt hop, he just has a toe drag of about 20in

[quote=“yanksneeddice-K”][quote=“kelvinp”]his mechanics arent wierd they just arent common
they only thing unusual that he does is hop off the mound[/quote]

he doesnt hop, he just has a toe drag of about 20in[/quote]

Sorry, but you’re wrong.

He gets airborne for a frame or two.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=“yanksneeddice-K”][quote=“kelvinp”]his mechanics arent wierd they just arent common
they only thing unusual that he does is hop off the mound[/quote]

he doesnt hop, he just has a toe drag of about 20in[/quote]

Sorry, but you’re wrong.

He gets airborne for a frame or two.[/quote]
I’ve never seen both of Tim’s feet off the mound at the same time.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=“yanksneeddice-K”][quote=“kelvinp”]his mechanics arent wierd they just arent common
they only thing unusual that he does is hop off the mound[/quote]

he doesnt hop, he just has a toe drag of about 20in[/quote]

Sorry, but you’re wrong.

He gets airborne for a frame or two.[/quote]

Could i possibly see a frame that he is totally airborne?

EDIT:

Chris, i just reviewed an frame by frame analysis of Lincecum on your site. I dont see any time that he is totally airborne. Here is the link to it:

http://www.chrisoleary.com/projects/Baseball/Pitching/ProfessionalPitcherAnalyses/TimLincecum.html

Unless its sometime between frames 59-61 then he always has at least one point of contact with the ground.

Sometimes he does, sometimes he doesn’t. He said himself that he does hop up – if my memory serves me correctly in an SI article he said “like jumping over a banana peel.”

[quote=“yanksneeddice-K”]…he always has at least one point of contact with the ground.[/quote]There is a point where his front foot hasn’t landed yet his back foot is completely turned over and dragging. No weight on it, even though it’s touching the ground. Amounts to a hop.

He’s got no weight on either foot around Frame 80.

That’s what I see.

His front heel has not yet planted and his back foot is toe down.

Ok, i see that. its not my definition of a hop though.

He’s got no weight on either foot around Frame 80.[/quote]

If that’s the definition of a “hop”, then every pitcher hops.

The “jump over a banana peel” reference was Lincecum talking about how he opens his front side, not how he “hops”. Pitchers that open very late (good) have a tendency to never really get open (bad), leaving the front foot in a slightly closed position. “Stepping over” is his way of mentally reminding himself to open his hips all the way.

Its a been a great que for my students.

Lincecum doesn’t hop purposely. That ankle kick (causes his amazing toe drag) and his “step over” (his hips want to go but he stops them to build torque) his says this stuff happens naturally to him, he was not taught this by his father.