Does Higher arm slot means better control?


#1

I know that different things work different for different peopple (sorry for 3x different).

But generaly speaking, does higher arm slot gives you better control then lets say low 3/4 arm slot?

To me that sounds logic since the ball goes straigther from higher arm slot.

I was trying to pitch over the top because I had control problems.

EDIT: In case you say that I should pitch from my natural arm slot…I dont know what is it, because I was experimenting with it to much.


#2

I can’t give you a detailed response, but I can say for me that hell yeah it helps with control. I struggled a TON at the beginning of the year because during ALL my winter throwing I developed a bad habit of keeping my elbow low. I had like 12 BB’s my first 6 2/3 innings which killed my ERA to begin with because i’d give up a hit or two with runners on. I just tell myself to not unravel too early so my front shoulder comes out premature, and to keep the elbow up. 4 BB’s in 14 innings since I made that adjustment.


#3

[quote=“Nikae09”]I know that different things work different for different peopple (sorry for 3x different).

But generaly speaking, does higher arm slot gives you better control then lets say low 3/4 arm slot?

To me that sounds logic since the ball goes straigther from higher arm slot.

I was trying to pitch over the top because I had control problems.

EDIT: In case you say that I should pitch from my natural arm slot…I dont know what is it, because I was experimenting with it to much.[/quote]

It does for me.

Also, I don’t believe in the idea of a natural arm slot. I can vary my arm slot at will (from overhand to submarine) just by tilting my shoulders.


#4

Yea, helps for me too. Even though my natural arm slot is low three quarter, I had been having a hell of a time controling my fastball, so I went closer to an overhand delivery. The ball stays lower, velocity is about the same, little more deception on my changeup, and I get a nasty 12-6 break on my curve that alone is worth the switch.

So if your having trouble finding the plate, tinker with some different arm angles.


#5

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
Also, I don’t believe in the idea of a natural arm slot. I can vary my arm slot at will (from overhand to submarine) just by tilting my shoulders.[/quote]

I disagree. Varying your slot at will is moot when discussing the “natural” slot. Everyone has a certain mechanical model for throwing which is identified by watching your two year old pick up a rock (or a ball, or a toy…whatever) and throw it. Some folks will maintain this arm slot forever. Others have it changed by their dad, or by being influenced by friends, coaches, other players, and or watching major leaguers. Whether it is a good slot or a bad slot doesn’t matter to this discussion. The question is whether it is “natural” or not.

As far as changing the arm slot, I would say do whatever is comfortable and you can be successful with…although some of those side-armers look like a trauma-ward-in-waiting.


#6

[quote=“hoseman18”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
Also, I don’t believe in the idea of a natural arm slot. I can vary my arm slot at will (from overhand to submarine) just by tilting my shoulders.[/quote]

I disagree. Varying your slot at will is moot when discussing the “natural” slot. Everyone has a certain mechanical model for throwing which is identified by watching your two year old pick up a rock (or a ball, or a toy…whatever) and throw it. Some folks will maintain this arm slot forever. Others have it changed by their dad, or by being influenced by friends, coaches, other players, and or watching major leaguers. Whether it is a good slot or a bad slot doesn’t matter to this discussion. The question is whether it is “natural” or not.

As far as changing the arm slot, I would say do whatever is comfortable and you can be successful with…although some of those side-armers look like a trauma-ward-in-waiting.[/quote]

I hear you.

But the thing is that there is no fundamental determinant of one’s arm slot (e.g. based on bone structure or something like that). Instead, the thing that controls the arm slot is the tilt of the shoulders and that is driven by things like the action of the glove side arm. Maybe things like balance and coordination come into play, but you would have a hard time making me believe that arm slot is genetic.


#7

Is there a natural arm position relative to the shouders?


#8

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
I hear you.

But the thing is that there is no fundamental determinant of one’s arm slot (e.g. based on bone structure or something like that). Instead, the thing that controls the arm slot is the tilt of the shoulders and that is driven by things like the action of the glove side arm. Maybe things like balance and coordination come into play, but you would have a hard time making me believe that arm slot is genetic.[/quote]

I don’t claim to be very conversant with the issue, as all I have to cull from are my own experiences with myself, my son, and my nephew. In my case, my dad changed me from side arm where I was comfortable and consistent, to straight over the top, which made my natural ball movement so severe that I couldn’t control it, and which I now believe led to a shoulder injury when I got older.

My son was nearly a second victim of my father’s well meaning but uninformed attempt to change a side armer into an over the topper. The very first time I took my son out to throw (at about 5 years old) I suggested he throw more over the top (as my dad had done to/for me). He was smarter than I ever could hope to be and told me up front that it didn’t feel right. I persevered, until he said his shoulder hurt when he threw like that. I told him to throw however he felt was the most comfortable, and I never tried to mess with his arm slot again. Even a bonehead like me knows pain when throwing isn’t good lol

Lastly, my nephew was an over the top guy in high school, crazy-good pitcher, had scouts looking at him, etc. After his junior year, he went in for surgery to remove a piece of bone that hung over the tendon,impinging on it and eventually causing minor tearing and inflammation. This bone spur was anatomically normal. Many people have it. But it was throwing over the top that caused the repeated tearing of the tendon in the shoulder. My nephew said the doc had told him that if he had thrown more sidearm he may never have noticed it.

Generally, while I think that anatomy plays a small role in most people’s arm slot, whether it is a little role or a large role depends on the person.

People are smart. If something hurts, they generally won’t do it (unless the reward is greater than the pain). If the way you are built makes it hurt when you throw from a high elbow-to-shoulder slot, you lower the elbow until it no longer hurts…or you quit throwing entirely…or you keep throwing as long as you are rewarded for throwing (or you break down).

But I admit that I have no empirical evidence to back up my assertions, and as such they are worth exactly as much as the nether material on which they were written.


#9

As the shoulders rapidly rotate toward the release point, the arms will tend to rotate perpendicular to the axis of rotation, which in this case is the upper spine.

This is more a function of the laws of physics than anatomy.


#10

Nikae,
The answer to your original question is that it does not give you better control. It can result in less movement on the ball but doesn’t have to. As a pitcher you are much better off learning to adjust to movement on a fastball than trying to get rid of it.

Pedro Martinez throws at a low 3/4 slot, has tons of movement and still has great control.


#11

[quote=“CADad”]Nikae,
The answer to your original question is that it does not give you better control. It can result in less movement on the ball but doesn’t have to. As a pitcher you are much better off learning to adjust to movement on a fastball than trying to get rid of it.

Pedro Martinez throws at a low 3/4 slot, has tons of movement and still has great control.[/quote]

Thanks!

I was experimenting with my arm action because I tought thats the main reason why I have such a bad control sometimes. I was ariginaly long armer (really long). I tried to shorten my arm action, dont know what is better…some say shorten it (Paul, Dick Mils) some say dont (Chris).
Its really frustrating when you must learn over the internet (no coaches around here).

I see a lot of MLB pitchers long arm the ball (Roy Oswalt,Justing Verlander, Vicente Padila) so I gues its ok? Does it efects control?


#12

it affects control if you cant control your long arming action ala freddy garcia vincente padilla, because you have to do the exact same thing with your arm and flying it wide like that makes it more difficult but when that is on lock control is not an issue anymore. dennis eckersley was longarming the ball and sidearming the ball at the same time but yet he’s one of the best control pitcher in the game history.