Do you work hard?

On Saturday, one of my clients broke his ankle throwing batting practice by getting it stuck in a net during his followthrough. Sunday he did a bunch of contrast baths and walked on it as best he could to stimulate the osteoblasts in his foot and promote blood flow.

Today he called me and came to the facility to throw weighted baseballs, medicine balls, and to get a modified upper body workout in.

There are no excuses for missing training dates.

I wouldn’t even say that my training program - four days per week, 2.5 hour sessions - is “working hard.” It would be a disgrace to those who are in the facility and outside twice per day, 2 hours per session. What we do is merely adequate.

I can’t stand the people who say they “work hard” but have terrible strength numbers, bad body composition, and are far behind skill-wise.

I grew up in the Midwest. A friend of a friend came into my facility today and he was from Cleveland too. We talked about how elite sports were in Cleveland (football particularly - look up St. Ignatius, or St. Edwards for wrestling) and how there were no training facilities there. It was good to recall that stuff. Kids simply worked way harder back there because they had less money and less opportunity.

All I want is to coach 15-20 kids that want it half as bad as the hardest working kids from poor areas of the Midwest. But in Seattle… I’m not sure there even are that many kids. It’s sad.

Honestly its the parents that you have to sell, kids learn their effort from their parents, parents that say “good try” they will have kids that will be happy where they are. Parents that motivate their kids to be better than their last practice, last game, last play…those are the kids that you can impact. You don’t need to waste your time recruiting kids/players, put your effort into parents, make them know how good their kid can be not just at sports but what your motivation can do with their lives in general. I am sure there are statistics about student athletes from the NCAA and GPA etc. hang those around your place. Don’t just do it for baseball though…soccer is big so hit that, football, tennis, hell ping pong if that works.

I agree. But parents think that weight lifting is bad - and it’s more than that. They are just not interested in hearing my side of the story. They have their minds made up and that is that. Plus, they love appeal to authority - they want to say “my kid works out with so and so in AA with the Mariners!”

Football is where it’s at, but kids are trapped in HS strength programs. I kid you not, there is a HS here whose strength program has turned out only seven kids who could bench 245 or more in thirteen years. That is unbelievably bad. I just coached a shot put/discus thrower to bench 245 in about six months. They can’t do it in four years.

So, I don’t know what the answer is, really.

Convincing parents about weight lifting starts at conditioning/speed/agility training and then moves into a weight program. The jump to weight lifting is a big one, I am in an industry where my business teaches 20,000 private lessons a year…not in baseball etc but a totally different industry. We can’t just jump to the program that we know is the one that will do what we “know” will give them all the benefits, we have to move them slowly forward toward the ultimate goal. You are sold on your product so you need to become a salesman for your industry/business, PM me if you would like me to be more specific.

[quote=“kyleb”]On Saturday, one of my clients broke his ankle throwing batting practice by getting it stuck in a net during his followthrough. Sunday he did a bunch of contrast baths and walked on it as best he could to stimulate the osteoblasts in his foot and promote blood flow.

Today he called me and came to the facility to throw weighted baseballs, medicine balls, and to get a modified upper body workout in.

There are no excuses for missing training dates.

I wouldn’t even say that my training program - four days per week, 2.5 hour sessions - is “working hard.” It would be a disgrace to those who are in the facility and outside twice per day, 2 hours per session. What we do is merely adequate.

I can’t stand the people who say they “work hard” but have terrible strength numbers, bad body composition, and are far behind skill-wise.

I grew up in the Midwest. A friend of a friend came into my facility today and he was from Cleveland too. We talked about how elite sports were in Cleveland (football particularly - look up St. Ignatius, or St. Edwards for wrestling) and how there were no training facilities there. It was good to recall that stuff. Kids simply worked way harder back there because they had less money and less opportunity.

All I want is to coach 15-20 kids that want it half as bad as the hardest working kids from poor areas of the Midwest. But in Seattle… I’m not sure there even are that many kids. It’s sad.[/quote]

Kyle, I’m no spring chicken but I can confidently tell you this…Whenever I read your posts here, it makes me wish that I lived in your neck of the woods. When you talk about training your passion is evident, and I wish I found more of that here in NY. I’ll never pitch in the pro’s, my college days are well behind me too…But I train for my 35 - 40 game season as if I’m gonna start 30 - 35 games over a 162 game season. I guess what I’m saying is keep it up. Even reading your posts are motivating!

If only we had athletes like that here. I’d actually prefer to train 28-40 year olds!

I opened up training to everyone who wants to train seriously. Pay what you want. No strict fees.

The problem is that “select” kids think they are training. They aren’t. They are being babysat.

Kyle, I posted these thoughts on the subject elsewhere on the website, but I feel that they bear repeating, so I shall do so.

  1. I forget the name of the movie, but I do remember this one scene where the manager was chewing out the players for failing to exert their best efforts. He yelled, “You’re lollygagging down the first base line. You’re lollygagging around the infield.Do you know what you are? YOU’RE LOLLYGAGGERS!” As funny as it may have been, I couldn’t help thinking about Yogi Berra when he was learning to catch. One day he hit one down the first base line—and he lollygagged, and he was easily thrown out. When he returned to the dugout, Joe DiMaggio went after him: “Are you all right, Yogi?” Berra said he was. DiMaggio snapped at him: “Then why the ----didn’t you run out that hit?” Yogi must have felt like the kid caught with both hands in the cookie jar—but from then on he hustled all the way.
  2. In 1988 Ed Lopat was being interviewed by a baseball writer. He had something to say on the subject, and he was uncharacteristically blunt. He said, “If you want to get better at whatever it is you’re doing, you have to work at it. You can’t just sit there and expect it to be handed to you on a platter.” And again it set me to thinking—this time about Whitey Ford as a rookie. Casey Stengel and Jim Turner had asked Lopat to take him under his wing and teach him things. Ford was a brash, cocky kid who thought he knew it all, and he was lollygagging, and Lopat was about to give up on him. but then Lopat realized something: under that brash exterior Ford was a scared kid who had never faced the immense pressure he was now facing as a major leaguer. So Steady Eddie eased up on him, but still expected him to buckle down and work at it. Ford did, and he developed into a legendary Yankee ace.
    And I thought about how Lopat recognized from the moment I asked him about the slider that I was really serious, that I wanted to know and was willing to work at it, and that therefore he had no hesitation about teaching me some very advanced stuff he felt I needed to know. I became a better pitcher than I had been before—because I was willing to work at it and perfect it as best I knew how. 8) :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:

Thanks!

Movie’s Bull Durham, BTW :slight_smile:

Kyle,
Whenever I read a post of yours, I wish I lived in Seattle to come train with you. My ultimate goal is to play pro ball and I will do anything to get there. I watch your training videos and I wish we had a training facility like that in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin. Maybe you could consider moving? :wink:

Probably easier for you to move here and train than me to move there and bring all my stuff. :wink: