Do i need to Gain or Lose?

Well i am 5ft 2 or 3 and 155 lbs. Now im a Wide Reciever and Safety in Football. And a outfielder and pitcher in Baseball. Im not ripped or anything i just lost alot of weight over the summer (was 175 really fat) now now im not really fat but im not tone.

So do i need to gain or lose more weight? I need this to benifit me for Baseball and Football. And what kinda Diet should i go on? Like not a fancy diet but what are some good foods to eat. And what like supplements should i take? (obviously can be to spendy)

Hold on how old are you @ 5’2-3"?? Or was it a typo meaning 6’…

Unless you are older than 18, I wouldn’t worry too much about trying to lose weight. Focus on being healthy and your weight will adjust to where it should be. That means eating healthy and exercising as often as possible - at least 30 minutes a day, but an hour is better. The problem with weight loss, especially for teenagers, is that you end up trying to cut lots of things out of your diet and you end up missing out on the good things. You need vitamins and minerals to grow. So instead of trying to limit yourself, try to add these foods. Berardi’s “superfoods”:
Lean red meat, Salmon, Omega 3 eggs, Lowfat plain yogurt, supplemental proteins (powders), spinach, tomatoes, cruciferous vegetables (brocoli, cabbage, cauliflower), mixed berries, oranges, beans, quinoa, whole oats, mixed nuts, avocados, olive oil, fish oil, flax seeds, green tea, liquid exercise drinks

Now, if you eat a lot of the good foods, one side effect will be that you arent eating as many bad foods. Combine that with exercise and you will be in great shape, plus healthy too.

Nope im 15 at 5ft 2.5

Wow, right now it is really hard for me to imagine you’re build.

Yeah…

| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
\ /

[quote=“jpeavy44”]Yeah…

| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
\ /[/quote]

Who gives a flying ****?

flying?

Ah, whatever I’m not taking anything away from you. Just listen to what kc said and keep working at it. I don’t wanna get in an argument over it – kid in my class is 4’11" and has the strongest legs you’ll see. He’s faaast.

Some of you guys could grow up a little bit in this thread.

The guy is asking for some help, kc is the only one to address his question. Yet for some reason there are several posts littering this thread. Let’s try making some posts that are a little more mature.

I know. That’s why I told him to ignore what I said and listen to kc’s advice.

wow, my dreams have just been crushed. I found somebody who is a foot shorter than me but weighs 10lbs more than me. and isnt fat

Weight is not really an issue in baseball, i mean look at David Wells he was a great pitcher who was chubbier than most pitchers. [/qt][/quote]

Forget about weight. Don’t matter one bit. Instead, focus on body fat percentage. That’s all your trainers and strength coaches in pro ball really care about.

As a pitcher, you generally want to be 10% to 12% BF.

i found out was 14% on friday. What can i do to get that beast of a percentage down?

Body fat percentage isn’t a very good marker for overall fitness. There are plenty of crackheads with low body fat. There are many examples of elite level athletes with very high body fat. Diet will have a major impact on how your body stores fat (or lack thereof) as well as lifestyle.

Also, anything below 18% bodyfat is considered normal for athletes.

And just as a way to illustrate this… check out this guy.


This slightly portly man is Fedor Emelianenko. He is the undisputed best heavyweight MMA fighter in the world. Just a little bit to think about.

Sprints, high intensity workouts. I’d steer away from dieting. You need mass as a pitcher, as dieting tend to defeat all the work you’ll do in the weight room. But to really reduce bf, you’ve got to bump up the intensity of your workouts.

[quote=“kc86”]Body fat percentage isn’t a very good marker for overall fitness. There are plenty of crackheads with low body fat. There are many examples of elite level athletes with very high body fat. Diet will have a major impact on how your body stores fat (or lack thereof) as well as lifestyle.

Also, anything below 18% bodyfat is considered normal for athletes.

And just as a way to illustrate this… check out this guy.


This slightly portly man is Fedor Emelianenko. He is the undisputed best heavyweight MMA fighter in the world. Just a little bit to think about.[/quote]

kc, you know I agree with just about everything you say regarding working out. Your workout suggestions are second to none. But honestly, most professional pitchers don’t look like this guy. He’s waaay to bulky on top. And if a pitcher in the Cubs organization reported to Sprint Training with 18% BF, he’d be in some serious trouble. That’s way too much. Now I know there are guys like David Wells, blah, blah. But they’re the exception. Not the rule.

My point about BF is that 250 pounds can be FAT if you’re 25% BF. 250 pounds can be GREAT if you’re 10% BF. So BF % is a better indicator than weight as to what’s good and what’s not.

It might be the case that a pro organization will not be happy if you have a high bodyfat number, and I’m sure you’d know more about that than me. What I am trying to point out though is that aerobic, anaerobic, and overall physical performance are not dependent on bodyfat percentages. For an athlete, I dont think that it should be a major concern. I know that Albert Pujols has stated that he feels much better playing at a higher bodyfat level (in an interview with Men’s Health). He is probably between 12 and 14% bf. I’d guess that most major leaguers are in that range, or maybe even a bit higher.

As far as dieting, I agree that you want to avoid caloric restriction. You can however, change the macronutrient ratio (carbs, fats, protein) to increase the thermic effect (calorie burning) in the body. John Berardi has some really good articles which illustrate this point. www.johnberardi.com check out the articles section.

Awesome picture kc, tell me your into mma!?!

I’m a huge mma fan, and Fedor is one of the baddest men on the planet! He put an absolute beatdown on Sylvia.

Yep Hammer. I’ve been watching MMA for about 5 or 6 years and I’m a blue belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Hopefully going to spend a couple months training Muay Thai in Thailand next year after graduation (provided I have money).

There are other examples of fighters who are a bit on the chubby side - Tim Boetsch, Chuck Liddell, Roy Nelson, Josh Barnett, and many others - but Fedor is probably the best example. Even though he is not a big guy, 6 foot and 235 pounds, he has never been overpowered in over 30 pro fights. That includes fighting opponents much bigger - Sylvia is 6’8" 270, Hong Man Choi is over 7 foot, and 300-something pounds, Semy Schilt is close to 7 feet tall - then it makes it that much more impressive.

MMA is obviously not baseball, and the specific requirements are different. However, the fact remains that you can be at 15% bf or higher, and still be much stronger, faster, and more powerful than someone with 10% bf or lower.