Dislocated shoulder after pitch

So just as the title says, I popped my shoulder out of it’s socket while throwing today. My coach popped it back in and everything is okay now, but I was wondering why that happened. Was it because my shoulder isn’t strong enough? Is it a tendon/ligament problem? Has this ever happened to any of you?

Ouch!

First off, it was not a dislocation. You suffered a shoulder subluxation. A dislocation means your shoulder came completely out of the socket and would have had to been put back into place by a medical professional. If your coach “popped” it back into place then he could have done irreparable damage. A subluxation occurs when it comes out of joint but then goes back into place.

The only reason I am saying this is because I suffered something similar. I did it while hitting though, and not pitching. I was chasing a high fastball and possibly over swung. During my back swing I felt my arm continue behind my back and then go numb. I immediately dropped the bat and tried to move my arm without avail. After trying to raise it above my head and move it in circles, it seemed to go back into the socket.

I somewhat stupidly, hard headed as I am, continued to play the final couple innings of the game in the outfield. My shoulder became very stiff and painful over the next few days so I visited the doc.

Diagnosis was a shoulder subluxation with partial SLAP tear. it was my non-throwing arm so I went to 4 weeks of physical therapy. After PT I resumed play. For about 6-8 months I would have some sharp pains during quick movements or in certain positions. I continued light resistance band exercises, very light weight workouts (2-5 lbs.), and a steady diet of push ups over the next year and I have had very limited issues with the shoulder.

Every now and again I do something to aggravate it, but the stability and range of movement in the shoulder is 99.999%. The doc told me shoulder surgery is no fun and is hard to rebound from. I saw some patients in PT that were recovering from shoulder surgery and they looked like they were in utter pain during their rehab. Since it was my non-throwing shoulder and I don’t have any significant problems I won’t need surgery. I was told that once you breach the integrity of the joint, chances are it can and will happen again without surgery to replace the stretched capsule. I am fine with push ups and resistance bands.

Hope this helps some and I wish you the best of luck on your recovery.

Ouch!

First off, it was not a dislocation. You suffered a shoulder subluxation. A dislocation means your shoulder came completely out of the socket and would have had to been put back into place by a medical professional. If your coach “popped” it back into place then he could have done irreparable damage. A subluxation occurs when it comes out of joint but then goes back into place.

The only reason I am saying this is because I suffered something similar. I did it while hitting though, and not pitching. I was chasing a high fastball and possibly over swung. During my back swing I felt my arm continue behind my back and then go numb. I immediately dropped the bat and tried to move my arm without avail. After trying to raise it above my head and move it in circles, it seemed to go back into the socket.

I somewhat stupidly, hard headed as I am, continued to play the final couple innings of the game in the outfield. My shoulder became very stiff and painful over the next few days so I visited the doc.

Diagnosis was a shoulder subluxation with partial SLAP tear. it was my non-throwing arm so I went to 4 weeks of physical therapy. After PT I resumed play. For about 6-8 months I would have some sharp pains during quick movements or in certain positions. I continued light resistance band exercises, very light weight workouts (2-5 lbs.), and a steady diet of push ups over the next year and I have had very limited issues with the shoulder.

Every now and again I do something to aggravate it, but the stability and range of movement in the shoulder is 99.999%. The doc told me shoulder surgery is no fun and is hard to rebound from. I saw some patients in PT that were recovering from shoulder surgery and they looked like they were in utter pain during their rehab. Since it was my non-throwing shoulder and I don’t have any significant problems I won’t need surgery. I was told that once you breach the integrity of the joint, chances are it can and will happen again without surgery to replace the stretched capsule. I am fine with push ups and resistance bands.

Hope this helps some and I wish you the best of luck on your recovery.

Blah, sorry for the double post…stupid Mac.

That’s what I always say—stupid computer, repeating itself.
I have a story to tell you about one of the Yankee pitchers, way back when, which goes to show you that the problem could stem from anywhere. In 1951 Eddie Lopat pitched two games in the World Series and won both games, 3-1 and 13-1…but after the second game he suddenly couldn’t lift his left arm. The weather may have been a factor; it was cold, damp and rainy all series. And he was a southpaw. Over the winter and into the spring he was having this problem, and the doctors couldn’t figure out what was the matter with him, so he began the 1952 season on the shelf. He had tried to pitch but was having no luck, so there he was on the disabled list, and he didn’t like it one bit because he wanted to pitch, was what he wanted to do!
But one day he remembered an orthopedic surgeon in Chicago, a guy he had known in his White Sox days. So he flew out there and saw the doctor, who checked him out and told him “Eddie, you have tendinitis in your left shoulder!” After chewing out Mr. Lopat for not having taken care of it sooner, this surgeon prescribed a treatment that was at the time radical but has not been used since then—a series of ten X-ray treatments to that left shoulder. It worked—the way it had for several other pitchers—and when Lopat returned to New York he was pitching better than ever; from then until the end of the 1954 season he ran up a total of 33 wins and 8 defeats.
And so it goes to show you—even Mother Nature can make things miserable for pitchers. 8) :roll: