Difference between pitching from windup Vs. stretch


#1

Help.

Can anyone help me with giving a more intelligent answer to the following question one of my 11 year old players asked:

What is the benefit of pitching from the windup? Do you get more power from the windup position?

Thanks to anyone who can help me give this lad an intelligent answer.


#2

I would never call anything I say intelligent, but this is one I believe in strongly … the benefits from throwing from the stretch ( ie., consistancy & balance ) outweigh any perceived (I think there is zero) increase in velocity. If I was bringing up a young pitcher (and I am) he would throw 100% from the stretch. The windup, in my opinion, consists of excessive movements that only provide more opportunities for error.


#3

[quote=“Lyle”]Help.

Can anyone help me with giving a more intelligent answer to the following question one of my 11 year old players asked:

What is the benefit of pitching from the windup? Do you get more power from the windup position?

Thanks to anyone who can help me give this lad an intelligent answer.[/quote]

IT not that you get so much more power from the windup opposed to the stretch, although the potential for more seems plausible. It has more to do with the energy it takes to create that power and being able to sustain it throughout. In short many think the windup conserves energy.

In general pitchers are balanced or they are not balanced obviously more skill the more balanced. For many may be just as easy to maintain good balance from the windup especially if the above has merit, which it does. From the stretch you create less motion while performing the task in less time this depletes energy more quickly because your requiring more energy for the task. A solid case could be made for using more energy in the stretch exclusively. This is a good reason why its important to perform the correct training in preparation for a season. Please dont mistake the last sentence as a prescription for vast amounts of cardio work, it isnt.


#4

Young kids often emulate what they see the pros doing. The mental image most kids have is that of a pitcher going from the wind-up. As a result, that what they do. When it comes time to pitch for real in, say, Little League, that’s what they’ve done the most and what they’re the most comfortable with so that’s what they do.

I believe pitchers throw their hardest when they’re throwing from their most comfortable delivery but that there is otherwise no advantage to the wind-up versus the stretch.


#5

Roger that…very well put .


#6

I’m with chinmusic on this. I don’t know of any science around this issue but my OPINION (and that’s all it is) is that the leg dropping from a knee lift can ASSIST in making the stride easier IF the transition from up to down/out is a smooth one that allows the kinetic energy of this mass dropping to be transferred effectively to the stride. Getting that mass out to landing during the stride MAY be easier and thus expend less energy over the course of a game than from the stretch.

What do you thing folks? I’d like to hear your comments since this is just opinion.

On another note re: the windup vs. the stretch is that it can help provide a rhythm and timing benefit that has an overall effectiveness factor to it.


#7

Here’s my take. There is no difference between the wind-up and stretch from the knee lift forward. But I feel the wind-up makes it easier to get into knee lift because the body is already in motion and the weight has just been shifted onto the pivot foot when it planted against the rubber. From the stretch, there is often a weight shift that has to occur and then the knee has to be lifted form a dead standstill. This can have balance ramifications for young or weak pitchers. The lack of balance could then certainly cascade into other problems.

As for the down/out motion of the leg, I feel that is old conventional wisdom that is not valid. And I used to preach it. But no more. All motion (i.e. up/down of the leg) that occurs before the torso starts to move forward just wastes time and give the base runner(s) a bigger jump. I now believe in taking the stride foot in a more straight path to the plant spot. However, I don’t really teach this part of the mechanics. If the hips are pushed out early and the knee lift is high (can’t cheat here), then the foot will only have time to take the shortest path to its plant spot.