Dick Mills

Is it worth it to buy his products? Is it worth the $397 for him to watch a video of me pitching then analyze it? I just want to know if this guy is for real and legitimate.

Thanks.

We’ve done Dick Mills a hundred ways to Sunday on the site, some like him alot, some think hes all wet. $400 is about 8 lessons with a local pitching coach of repute. You have to weight value against cost and what you want to accomplish…might be worth it if you have a specific issue that you believe he can identify and correct in one video analysis…might not. A bunch of money…what level/age are you?

I wouldn’t waste the money. I haven’t seen anybody in the major leagues using his “scientifically backed” type of throwing, and am not aware of any of his students throwing 95mph+ using these types of mechanics. Correct me if I’m wrong. There are MANY other reasons as well why I’d stay away from him but let’s keep this thread clean.

my .02

Thanks guys.

jdfromfla: I’m 16 going into my Junior year of High School.

Humph.
I think I mentioned this before—but I wouldn’t trust anyone who doesn’t give it to you straight as far as I could throw him. This character says he pitched in the major leagues in the '60s and '70s. I checked the record books, and I found that his major league experience consisted of 3 2/3 innings of relief with the Red Sox in 1970, no decision, walked three and struck out three, gave up six hits. Now what does that tell you?
No, it’s definitely not worth it. :no:

just reading stuff off of his website he is totaly not worth it. you proably could self teach yourself momentum pitching if u really want. it seems like you have to do it evactly right to not get injured.

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Humph.
I think I mentioned this before—but I wouldn’t trust anyone who doesn’t give it to you straight as far as I could throw him. This character says he pitched in the major leagues in the '60s and '70s. I checked the record books, and I found that his major league experience consisted of 3 2/3 innings of relief with the Red Sox in 1970, no decision, walked three and struck out three, gave up six hits. Now what does that tell you?
No, it’s definitely not worth it. :no:[/quote]

No, I don’t support Mills, nor do I like what he teaches. However, he did pitch in the big leagues, which is more than 99.9 percent of people who have ever picked up a baseball can ever say. Making it to the big leagues is an incredible accomplishment.

[quote=“Hammer”][quote=“Zita Carno”]Humph.
I think I mentioned this before—but I wouldn’t trust anyone who doesn’t give it to you straight as far as I could throw him. This character says he pitched in the major leagues in the '60s and '70s. I checked the record books, and I found that his major league experience consisted of 3 2/3 innings of relief with the Red Sox in 1970, no decision, walked three and struck out three, gave up six hits. Now what does that tell you?
No, it’s definitely not worth it. :no:[/quote]

No, I don’t support Mills, nor do I like what he teaches. However, he did pitch in the big leagues, which is more than 99.9 percent of people who have ever picked up a baseball can ever say. Making it to the big leagues is an incredible accomplishment.[/quote]

This is my first post…I’m excited. Yes, you should respect anyone that has made it to the Big Leagues in any capacity because, like you said, 99% don’t. But that’s a problem in America today in regards to baseball instruction…parents of the youth should know that great players aren’t necessarily indicative of great teachers. Chris O’Leary is a good example, I think. His thoughts on mechanics are spot on and he definitely has the ability to analyze a video and tell you what’s wrong. But I’m not sure how I would feel about his advice on exactly how to fix the problem, seeing as how he’s never played before. It helps if you personally have felt it and tried to make adjustments yourself. But that’s just my .02

[quote=“bosox2311”]Is it worth it to buy his products? Is it worth the $397 for him to watch a video of me pitching then analyze it? I just want to know if this guy is for real and legitimate.

Thanks.[/quote]

Dick Mills worked with Barry Zito before he went up to the majors. Enough said.

And look what barry zito is now. a low 80’s flat fastball. If he believed mills was the product of his success than why isnt he going back to him?

also Barry Zito looks almost nothing like what Dick Mills preaches.

Funny, neither did his son Ryan Mills, back when he was throwing 95 mph. Yet Dick Mills still claimed his success and used him as a marketing tool, despite teaching people to do the opposite of what his son was doing.

[quote=“LankyLefty”]also Barry Zito looks almost nothing like what Dick Mills preaches.

Funny, neither did his son Ryan Mills, back when he was throwing 95 mph. Yet Dick Mills still claimed his success and used him as a marketing tool, despite teaching people to do the opposite of what his son was doing.[/quote]

"We can’t be Batman to all the Robins in the world."
Rod MeKuen

“Dick Mills worked with Barry Zito before he went up to the majors. Enough said.”

what does this say? im not arguing for or against mills but zito does absolutely nothing of what mills teaches with his momentum pitching. and plus mills has changed alot of his views since then anywas.

zita, i respect many of your posts but your way off on this one. mills isnt worth it because he only pitched 3 innings in mlb? so you can only take advice from a hall of famer. just because someone is great at pitching doesnt mean they can teach it. could be wrong but did paul nyman even pitch professionally at any level and many people love the work he does.

Memo to tdbaseball: I think you’re reading this all wrong. I never said anything about only taking advice from a hall of famer. What I did point out was that there are many varieties of pitching coach and/or pitching instructor, and I mentioned it in the paper I presented at the SABR conference in Cleveland. Viz., namely and to wit:
There are those who can pitch and who can coach and teach pitching.
There are those who can’t pitch their way out of a paper bag but who can coach and teach.
There are those who can pitch but who can’t coach and teach.
There are those who can’t pitch and who can’t coach and teach.
Not to mention that there were, and are, a number of players who were not pitchers but who were renowned as teachers of pitching—for example, Paul Richards, a very good catcher who may have known more about pitching than a lot of pitchers.
I think we’ve all encountered a number of examples of each, n’est-ce pas? :slight_smile:

ok thanks for clearing that up

Obviously Dick Mills is a very controversial figure in the pitching world, I have bought one of his books and his power conditioning for pitchers workout program. As a personal user I believe that the workout program works very well. I felt a lot stronger after finishing the entire program. I was throwing harder but not the 5-7 mph liike he says it was more like 2-3 but every mph counts. The book I believe its called my 101 secrets to pitching success. He had a lot of valueable info. about a numerous topics, goal setting, in-season workout routines, off-season, more effective bullpens, etc. As far as his mechanics that he teaches I am not a believer. What he teaches mechanically just doesnt make sense to me and I havent really seen it work except for on person Tim Lincecum and he has been throwing that way his whole life

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Humph.
I think I mentioned this before—but I wouldn’t trust anyone who doesn’t give it to you straight as far as I could throw him. This character says he pitched in the major leagues in the '60s and '70s. I checked the record books, and I found that his major league experience consisted of 3 2/3 innings of relief with the Red Sox in 1970, no decision, walked three and struck out three, gave up six hits. Now what does that tell you?
No, it’s definitely not worth it. :no:[/quote]

How many pitchers do you know that even made it to the Bigs?

Lincecum does not use the mechanics that Dick Mills advocates. I doubt he even knew of Dick Mills until he was in college. Mills is just making his mechanics seem more successful saying that any pitcher using a long stride in the major leagues follows him.

He makes it seem simple, and its not.