Determining which side of the rubber

How do you decide which side of the rubber to pitch from? Are there any basic rules? Should right handed pitchers be on one side and lefties on the other, or should it be based on the types of pitches that you throw?

I’ve heard some different thoughts on this subject, just wanted to hear your ideas.

Thanks

Personally I like the left side (facing home plate)
I’m right handed

I like it because my two seam goes harder on a righties hands, and pulls farther away from lefties.

I mainly keep the ball outside, and I like the angle, because I’m not crossing over my body.

Ideally, you should throw from the right side of the rubber if you’re RH’ed and vice versa if you’re a LH’er.

It supposedly makes it more difficult for a better to get an early read on the pitch.

Where you feel the most comfortable is what I would prescribe. I threw almost dead center just slightly to the right (RH).

Pitching coaches have preached to me about using different sides of the rubber, but I have never really understood the logic why. I just pitch in the middle of the rubber always. I got size 16 feet so I guess I throw with the whole rubber :lol:

My son’s pitching coach has been trying to get him to move to the right side, but he also wears a 15/16 shoe so it is very difficult. He feels more comfortable on the left side with that side of a foot.

I ve heard from an ex major league pitcher that as a righty u should pitch from the right side of the rubber to make it seem like the like the ball i coming from behindthe batters head. This gives seemingly better action on your curveball and will add a few feet to your fastball.

wen a guy is on base, i move to the right (i am a righty) so i can get a better pickoff. but ii am usually in the middle

Your question is interesting to me because I always pitched from the left side of the rubber. ( I’m right handed.) Yet the right side was advocated by many. So I looked at the first 38 pitcher video clips on this site. Of these 38 I could tell where on the rubber they threw from in 28. Thirteen were righties throwing from the left side or lefties from the right side. Only 5 were the opposite. (So much for the consensus of opinion.) I reality I personally would go from where you are most comfortable and throw the most strikes.

well typically…baseball is a game of inches…and the more the left on the rubber the closer the pick off to 1st and vice-versa for 3rd.

I’m a LHP, and throw from the left side. I was told a while back that it makes handcuffing RH-batters more effective, since it’s coming in at them more.

I can’t believe some of what I’m reading where RHP are pitching off the first base side of the rubber!

Simply think a little bit about what throwing off that side of the rubber does to your curveball and it’s CLEAR that you should be on the throwing arm side. This is why so many pitchers throw backup sliders, because they dont’ follow through properly because they’re on the wrong side of the rubber.

As for the ball bearing in more on right handers, why not just start on that side of the rubber from the beginning?

I can’t believe that in 2008 this conversation still exists.

I can’t believe it’s not butter!!!

Besides the fact that the FASTBALL is more IMPORTANT… I’d take a plus fastball and a mediocre curve any day… (over average both)

No, the reason is because they don’t practice enough.

[quote]
As for the ball bearing in more on right handers, why not just start on that side of the rubber from the beginning? [/quote]

The ball will be slower and WONT bear in on a right hander AS MUCH if you throw on the RH side for a RHP. Think about it. The ball has to come from ‘behind the batter’ then tail back in? Why not throw the ball ‘towards’ the batter from the left side and have it tail in?

I can’t believe you exist in 2008. Did you read the thread?

[quote=“gcfan3307”]I can’t believe some of what I’m reading where RHP are pitching off the first base side of the rubber!

Simply think a little bit about what throwing off that side of the rubber does to your curveball and it’s CLEAR that you should be on the throwing arm side. This is why so many pitchers throw backup sliders, because they dont’ follow through properly because they’re on the wrong side of the rubber.

As for the ball bearing in more on right handers, why not just start on that side of the rubber from the beginning?

I can’t believe that in 2008 this conversation still exists.[/quote]
Exactly what does a RHP throwing from the 1B side of the rubber do to the curve? Also, how does throwing from the glove side of the rubber cause pitchers to not follow through properly?

I’m a LHP and i always throw from the right side of the rubber.

I’m not sure if there are any benefits, but I’ve been told that I open my glove hand shoulder earlier than normal, so if i miss i usually miss outside to righty batters. At the very least, by starting on the right side of the rubber i won’t miss as much as i would if i started on the left.

my mechanics and the side of the rubber i pitch from also make hitting the outer half of the plate very comfortable. for me at least.

well it seems to me that the most logical thing to do is this:

  • If you mainly throw 4-seam fastballs, or if your fastball does not tail very much, then you should throw on the throwing arm side of the rubber
  • If you mainly throw 2-seam fastballs (like me), or if your fastball has some significant tail to it, they you should throw on the glove side of the rubber

since my fastball tails, standing on the left side of the mound is ideal for me (RHP)
if I throw across my body on the right side of the rubber, my fastball won’t be as effective

if my fastball didn’t tail, standing on the other side of the mound would be ideal
my fastball would be coming at the hitter and thus harder to hit

if you throw both, then it’s just a matter of personal preference
I prefer glove side 8)

What about changing that upto to mix up the batter?

Changing from one side of the rubber to another can have a significant effect on posture and, therefore, release point. As such, I feel it’s not something you want to be changing.

Trevor Hoffman does something to this extent. He uses the 3B side against lefties and the 1B side against righties.

My pitching coach did a drill with the pitchers from my team. He grabed a long piece of rope that went from the mound to the plate. He did this to show us the angles of different plate positions. I personally have my heel touching the 3B part of the rubber (RH). This exercise emphised it as the angle from that side is massive.

Standing in the middle of the plate gives the ball the look of it going straight into the zone. On the left u have more angle on the RH but to a lefty its easy to read. whereas a RH pitcher pitching from the RH side nearly releases the ball behind the hitter. Thats why side arm pitchers are better against there own side.

Its all about the maths :wink:

I’m surprised at the old school responses here.

Positioning on the rubber is dependant on the pitcher. The NPA has some excellent insight but the jist of it is, the little bit of gain you can get on the batter with the angle is pointless if you lose efficiency and velocity. The end of your drag line tells you exactly where your momentum is directed at release (since the drag line ends at release).

A simple and quick way to find out where you belong on the rubber is to draw a line from the middle of the rubber towards the middle of the plate. Throw a pitch and check where the end of your drag line is. If you aren’t on that center line with the end of your drag line, move yourself on the rubber until it is (whichever direction that requires). Maximum efficiency.