Dealing with ex-professional coach and his comments

Yesterday, my coach questioned my desire in baseball after I threw a complete game and had two innings where i allowed 2 runs. After that, I shut them down the rest of the game with hardly anyone touching me. According to him, its unacceptable that I could just find “it” and turn it on out of nowhere. He played single-A ball for the Tigers before illness and injury ended his career. This isn’t the only instance in which he’s attacked personally. Does anyone have any advice?

Ask yourself what you are staying for and base your decision on what means something to you. He may not be the only coach that ever personally attacks you…are you getting what you need out of the team? Yes…get over it, no? Tell him adios…
Keep it simple, think about the future and be honest to your self and it will work out.

Did you have a different motivation after the 2 runs were scored on you? Or was your demeanor the same?

1st thing you need to do completely remove the fact that he’s an ex-professional player. That in and of itself doesn’t qualify anyone to be a coach or manager! An ex-pro had obvious playing skills, and that’s a far cry from having managerial or teaching skills.

I know quite a few ex and current coaches from LL to HS to College to Mil to ML, and they run the gamut as far as skills of all kinds go. It may be that this particular guy believes by using that approach, he’s instilling the kind of attitude he believes is necessary to play the game successfully, or it may be that he’s just a jerk and needs someone to put their foot in his behind.

But no matter what the truth is, he’s the coach and you’ve got to deal with it. You really need to consider what your approach should be. I have no idea what your situation is, but I’ll throw this out there.

If you’re a HS player and a Sr, I say let it go in one ear and out the other because you only have to deal with him for a couple more weeks. If the situation is different and you might have to play for him again, you better think long and hard about what to do.

Good luck!

1st thing you need to do completely remove the fact that he’s an ex-professional player. That in and of itself doesn’t qualify anyone to be a coach or manager! An ex-pro had obvious playing skills, and that’s a far cry from having managerial or teaching skills.

I know quite a few ex and current coaches from LL to HS to College to Mil to ML, and they run the gamut as far as skills of all kinds go. It may be that this particular guy believes by using that approach, he’s instilling the kind of attitude he believes is necessary to play the game successfully, or it may be that he’s just a jerk and needs someone to put their foot in his behind.

But no matter what the truth is, he’s the coach and you’ve got to deal with it. You really need to consider what your approach should be. I have no idea what your situation is, but I’ll throw this out there.

If you’re a HS player and a Sr, I say let it go in one ear and out the other because you only have to deal with him for a couple more weeks. If the situation is different and you might have to play for him again, you better think long and hard about what to do.

Good luck![/quote]

Great response here. Know a couple former big leaguers who can not teach the game any better than a guy who has never played a day in his life! It’s amazing the difference between playing baseball and teaching it.

Thank the good Lord I am better at teaching it. :smiley:

A few years ago I did a presentation for the Jack Graney chapter of SABR (Society for American Baseball Research) in Cleveland—about pitching coaches. A good part of this presentation was a trip to the zoo, so to speak, in which I scrutinized several distinct varieties of coach—viz., namely and to wit:

  1. The ones who could pitch and who could also coach and teach.
  2. The ones who couldn’t pitch their way out of a paper bag but who could coach and teach and who did it well.
  3. The ones who could pitch—but who couldn’t coach or teach to save themselves.
  4. The ones who couldn’t do either.
    It seems to me that this guy falls into Category 3. He pitched in pro ball and did a creditable job of it, but when it comes to coaching—mneh! (sour face) I guess nobody ever told him that it’s one thing to throw a mean curveball but it’s something else altogether to teach someone how to do it and in a good professional manner, without rancor or yelling at the pitcher.
    In the course of the discussion I mentioned one of the best of the Category 1 individuals—a guy named Ed Lopat who not only was a key member of the Yankees’ Big Three of way back when but also was one of the finest pitching coaches anyone could ever hope to work with. I had the great good fortune to work with him for almost four years, and what I learned from him was nothing short of priceless. He was a calm, matter-of-fact individual who firmly believed that each pitcher has a natural motion and who would work with that pitcher to maximize his or her capabilities, and I remember how he gave me more reassurance, support and reinforcement than I had ever thought possible all the while he was working with me on the crossfire, on holding runners on base, you name it. Too bad they don’t make coaches like that any more.

I’ve seen many games in which the starting pitcher had a rough first inning or two and then suddenly found his groove and was untouchable
the rest of the way. It’s unfortunate that this particular coach, who saw fit to question the kid’s motivation, has never seen this—or, worse yet, never experienced rough starts himself. JD, you have my express permission to give him a good swift kick in the gluteus maximus! :baseballpitcher:

Thanks guys, those are all great tips. We were on a 6 game losing streak after that game so that might have had something to do with it. We won yesterday so he might be a little happier now. Also, have you ever heard of a coach only calling fastballs one inning for whatever reason? He did that to me in one of the innings I allowed two runs. And my breaking stuff was the best it’s been all season that day.

Did you ask him?
Go to his office sit down (In front of the team would be a bad choice of timing and location) and say coach…tell me what you were thinking…it was interesting to me and I want to learn strategy…see if you can’t work in a discussion about shaking him off in instances where you feel it strong and try to get into his head…working together beats bumping heads and usually if you do it in a way that lets a coach know you totally respect his position sometimes (Not always…but the good ones usually) they will open up. It will also show him that you are willing to stretch and get outside “the box”…all sorts of good things can come from it.