Dead arm! help

i have a dead arm what should i do to get my speed back soon, ive lost 5 mph since i stated weights

Let me quote one of my favorite books, “The Hitchhikers guide tto the Galaxy” DON’T PANIC"!!!
Tanner you are going to have these minutes, what has your coach said? We aren’t there with you except in spirit, my first inclination is suggesting you move off of upper body work for a couple of days and give it a rest (Right time of year anyway). I know your workout is bigger than you were used to. NPA is IMO the best arm maintenance resource out there so maybe they have some suggestions that may prove helpful.
Right now, I’d be talking to whoever is in charge of conditioning at school and see where they think you ought to adjust and if they don’t get you right, then move it up a level, it is important to stay within your own program (Unless you get results that fall short), that failing, perhaps Roger can get you an NPA contact (Half of Houses clinics concentrate on arm maintenance). That failing get with me and I’ll hook you up with Jarrod Payne (He is a great resource for pitching conditioning).
Let us know.

[quote=“jdfromfla”]Let me quote one of my favorite books, “The Hitchhikers guide tto the Galaxy” DON’T PANIC"!!!
Tanner you are going to have these minutes, what has your coach said? We aren’t there with you except in spirit, my first inclination is suggesting you move off of upper body work for a couple of days and give it a rest (Right time of year anyway). I know your workout is bigger than you were used to. NPA is IMO the best arm maintenance resource out there so maybe they have some suggestions that may prove helpful.
Right now, I’d be talking to whoever is in charge of conditioning at school and see where they think you ought to adjust and if they don’t get you right, then move it up a level, it is important to stay within your own program (Unless you get results that fall short), that failing, perhaps Roger can get you an NPA contact (Half of Houses clinics concentrate on arm maintenance). That failing get with me and I’ll hook you up with Jarrod Payne (He is a great resource for pitching conditioning).
Let us know.[/quote]thanks for the quick response jd! i will talk to my coach

Sounds like you’re adapting to a new college workout regimen. Your body is probably a bit more fatigued than normal. This can happen a lot at the high school and college level. My guess is that as long as you continue to prepare in a way that is beneficial to pitching, you will get your velocity back and be more fit to pitch in the long run.

If your Central Nervous system isn’t used to the intense lifting and conditioning you won’t have as much power.

A decent indicator of a weak CNS is your grip strength in the morning. If it is nice and strong long it would be late in the day then you should be good. I’ve had mornings where I can’t even grip the doorknob though, definitely indicating a burnt out CNS.

I don’t know if you hang around the party scene at all but if your out more than you are used to that can take a major toll on your body. Combine that with a new training program and it would definitely be a measurable loss of performance.

It should progressively come back, and possibly be better (or at least last longer than before) however if it doesn’t, than definitely follow JD’s suggestion and see about making some changes.

Good luck, hopefully all goes well at Western.

The NPA posted an article on their website a while back (in the members-only section) about dead arm. The article says that dead arm is a deficit situation in which the body is unable to recover. The solution is to back off enough to allow your body to recover and get out of the deficit. The article recommended cutting work load back to about 70% of normal.

Here are a couple key paragraphs from the article:

[i]"Since dead arm is a deficit issue, it is counter productive to work harder to cure it. Many pitchers overwork into a ‘black hole’ that is difficult from which to return. Ultimately they and their coaches are convinced that dead arm is due to not enough work, when in fact it is just the opposite. The body has been put in a deficit from over use. Dead arm is a result of this deficit which is the body’s way of not letting us overextend it. The body is basically trying to protect itself from injury.

The solution to overcoming dead arm is actually much easier than you may have imagined. All you have to do is back off of your training and throwing regimen a bit. If you work at about 70% of your normal workloads, you will find that your arm will recover in short order. Just backing off 30% will allow your body to recover. Still do all the conditioning, weight lifting, flat ground, and drills that you normally do, but just back off a bit. There is no magic potion or magic pill. You just have to detrain to retrain. "[/i]

From "Coming Back from Dead Arm"
By Ryan Sienko
National Pitching Association

Told ya so :lol: