David Robertson's Beautiful Forward Rotation


#1

I really hate the fact this is called “extension.” It’s trunk flexion and late torso rotation.

Calling it “extension” is one step away from using the towel drill to slap a glove out front to help release the ball closer to the plate.


#2

kyleb,

this guy has some of the cleanest mechanics in the majors. One question: DO you think that pitchers who purposely counter rotate their shoulders as they drive down the mound, ala Tim lincecum and k-rod, get better velocity?

What i mean by this is keeping your glove kind of reaching to the third base side and across your body if you are a RHP driving down the mound It seems to me this would allow them to stay closed longer as their hips open up

thanks


#3

I agree about Robertson’s mechanics for the most part.

Additionally, I agree with your assertion about a consciously counter-rotated torso to keep it on line with the plate and avoid opening early.


#4

Great stuff Kyle


#5

Speaking on conscious counter-rotating. It’s something I have played around with and have gotten very good results. For me, it helps me stay closed longer better, makes my arm action more consistent(from an external rotation stand point).

I also feel like my accuracy is more consistent as well. Overall, I feel like my mechanics are better when I do that.

So it’s something I would recommend guys toying with because it has helped me remain more consistent mechanically


#6

[quote=“kyleb”]
I really hate the fact this is called “extension.” It’s trunk flexion and late torso rotation.[/quote]
Actually, it’s low back extension followed by trunk flexion and late torso rotation. And that kind of extension will help you release the ball closer to the plate. :nod:


#7

True, but low back extension alone actually keeps you further away from the plate :wink:

“Extension” as it is commonly thought of (and I know you know this) is the “reach out” theory of pitching, which is totally invalid.


#8

True, but while you’re getting into and momentarily holding the low back extension (if you’re able - this is really more strength/flexibility than mechanics), the body continues to track forward. So low back extention coupled with forward momentum actually allows the release point to get closer to home plate. The ability to get into that position and hold it for a moment or two is one of the characteristics that, to me, distinguishes the elite from the rest.

Agree with you on the “reach out” theory.