curveball

how do i throw this? i have been trying to throw mike marshalls maxline pronation curveball and his screwball, I am getting some break on the screwball but not much on the curveball, only a little. How do you get a tighter rotation on the curveball? i read something that said to put the pressure on the thumb and index finger if you want a true bigger curveball, are there any drills to make for a better breaking ball? I already throw a C-change, thanks guys.

i’ve been reading and I hear to choke it into your hand and throw it with same arm speed, but karate chop it? wouldnt that get a slider motion instead? how do you release the ball closer to your body also? and when i finish I know with the maxline pronation curve you pronate through the ball, but should you be pronating or supinating with a traditional curveball I also hear that the maxline pronation curve gets on average 17-19 revolutions before the plate, while a traditional one gets 13-14.

take black electrical tape and tape around the equator of the ball around the 4 seams equator. however you can get the ball to spin with the tape spinning smoothly and fast will get your best break. remember you want the ball to spin as fast as possible. you must concentrate on spin when you throw the fastball.

i don’t like marshall’s stuff. nice educated guy but i recommend using the traditional motion he used when he won his cy young award.

With the traditional motion, the ball with “flop” out of your hand and roll over your index finger. The pronation happens after release. In order to pronate a curveball through release like Marshall pitchers do, your hand has to start in an extremly supinated position where the ball is almost facing 2B and your fingers in front of the ball. Traditional pitchers have the ball facing their head and their fingers on the side of the ball, therefore, they cannot pronate through release. They only pronate after release.

In Marshall’s motion, you drive the ball with the middle finger while you pronate. Active pronation has an advantage in Marshall’s motion because your throwing arm will end up on the same side, whereas in the traditional motion you finish across your body.

ok so Ill just throw his screwball, thanks guys ill try the electrical tape thing. I also read somethign you do dusty delso, with a roll of athletic tape? liek throwing it I guess?

ok I did the electrical tape and got it right around the equator of the ball lol, and the marshall curve gets the black line really straight, but its pretty much the same with the traditional curve, I cant tell which one has a tighter spin though.

whoever you’re playing catch with will tell you which one moves more. best i can tell, marshall’s curveball is a traditional screwball if the palm is between the ball and your head. if you throw the curveball properly it shouldn’t flop. it should be thrown hard enough to look like a fastball and then break at the end. a good curveball does not pop up out of your hand, it comes out relatively flat then drops.

the roll of athletic tape is thrown to make it tumble forward. it’s another way to check for proper release and spin. if you hold the tape by the outside of the roll between the thumb and index finger held horizontally and spin it forward, this is how the tape should spin.

the tape should rotate 12/6 smooth and fast on release when you throw it. use it to play catch with someone.

[quote=“dusty delso”]whoever you’re playing catch with will tell you which one moves more. best i can tell, marshall’s curveball is a traditional screwball if the palm is between the ball and your head. if you throw the curveball properly it shouldn’t flop. it should be thrown hard enough to look like a fastball and then break at the end. a good curveball does not pop up out of your hand, it comes out relatively flat then drops.

the roll of athletic tape is thrown to make it tumble forward. it’s another way to check for proper release and spin. if you hold the tape by the outside of the roll between the thumb and index finger held horizontally and spin it forward, this is how the tape should spin.

the tape should rotate 12/6 smooth and fast on release when you throw it. use it to play catch with someone.[/quote]

I can do the tape it does spin 12-6 and pretty tight rotation, and it depends who I play catch with, 4 people say it breaks and pretty good sometimes, then theres a few who say it doesnt move at all…

Well If you just want a curveball I know an easy way to learn one… tape 2 baseballs together and just play catch with it… try to get it where it spins straight up and down… it doesnt have to be perfect but close will help a lot. just playing catch with it helps you learn it… and it helps control too atleast it did in my case

ill try it.

play catch with the guys who say it breaks for now. the hitters will tell you real quick if it breaks or not if you can throw it for a strike.

[quote=“dusty delso”]whoever you’re playing catch with will tell you which one moves more. best i can tell, marshall’s curveball is a traditional screwball if the palm is between the ball and your head. if you throw the curveball properly it shouldn’t flop. it should be thrown hard enough to look like a fastball and then break at the end. a good curveball does not pop up out of your hand, it comes out relatively flat then drops.

the roll of athletic tape is thrown to make it tumble forward. it’s another way to check for proper release and spin. if you hold the tape by the outside of the roll between the thumb and index finger held horizontally and spin it forward, this is how the tape should spin.

the tape should rotate 12/6 smooth and fast on release when you throw it. use it to play catch with someone.[/quote]

So this is not “flopping”?


Marshall’s curveball is a curveball. The palm is not between the ball and the head. The palm is facing close to second base and the back of the hand close to home plate. The hand/wrist must be in an extremely supinated position for this to be possible. From this supinated position, one would pronate while the arm is accelerating forward. The ball does not “flop” out of the hand like traditional pitchers do. The fingers roll over/off the ball in Marshall’s motion. In the traditional motion, the ball rolls over/off the fingers.

The amount of supination needed for Marshall’s curveball is very close to what Zito is doing here.

Except of course, Zito is not throwing a pronation curve. His curve “flops” out of his hand.