Curveball

Finally finished up the p.t and rehab associated with my knee injury so I am back to throwing off of a mound again. My velocity is surprisingly okay despite the hiatus and my change up is working. However, since my break, my curveball is up and its still flat when I get it down. I think when I leave it up its a release point deal but I am wondering if anyone has any tips on how to get the feal back for that good 12-6 break. I was always taught the “over the barrell” mechanic. With the break I am rusty and having difficulty getting that muscle memory back again. Any suggestions or ideas would be much apprecitated!

There’s an expression: “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” It comes from gymnastics and refers to a move on the parallel bars that can be performed correctly in several different ways. And so it goes for the curveball—there’s more than one way to throw it and do so effectively. I wish I could say that it doesn’t matter which arm slot you use, but I can’t, because apparently you have been having trouble throwing over the top—straight overhand, and as a result you’ve lost your feel for that pitch.
Let’s start from the beginning. You want to regain your feel for the pitch. So get off the mound, sit down on a bench and just take the ball in your hand. Feel it—the surface of the ball, each of the seams. Really get the sense of the ball. Next, get the sense of the wrist action; you’ll discover that there are several different ways you can do it. (I was one of those exasperating sidearm pitchers, threw that way all the time, and I threw my curve—a natural one that came attached to my sidearm delivery—with a sharp karate-chop wrist action, which gave the pitch a very nasty break indeed.) Then just pantomime throwing the ball—and see where your natural arm slot is. It may or may not be over the top—straight overhand; what you want is to get that muscle memory back, get comfortable with that elusive curve ball.
Finally, get a catcher, go into the bullpen and just practice throwing that curve ball. You might want to have the catcher position his mitt in various places, high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head, and what you want to do is get that ball smack-dab into the pocket of said mitt. This is a drill I used to do a lot in my playing days; we called it “ball and strike”, and it was not only a terrific workout but also a lot of fun, enabling me to really sharpen my control and command of the pitches I threw.
Above all—relax. It may take some time, but eventually you’ll get it—and you will have a nice curve ball to work with. :slight_smile: 8)

There’s an expression: “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” It comes from gymnastics and refers to a move on the parallel bars that can be performed correctly in several different ways. And so it goes for the curveball—there’s more than one way to throw it and do so effectively. I wish I could say that it doesn’t matter which arm slot you use, but I can’t, because apparently you have been having trouble throwing over the top—straight overhand, and as a result you’ve lost your feel for that pitch.
Let’s start from the beginning. You want to regain your feel for the pitch. So get off the mound, sit down on a bench and just take the ball in your hand. Feel it—the surface of the ball, each of the seams. Really get the sense of the ball. Next, get the sense of the wrist action; you’ll discover that there are several different ways you can do it. (I was one of those exasperating sidearm pitchers, threw that way all the time, and I threw my curve—a natural one that came attached to my sidearm delivery—with a sharp karate-chop wrist action, which gave the pitch a very nasty break indeed.) Then just pantomime throwing the ball—and see where your natural arm slot is. It may or may not be over the top—straight overhand; what you want is to get that muscle memory back, get comfortable with that elusive curve ball.
Finally, get a catcher, go into the bullpen and just practice throwing that curve ball. You might want to have the catcher position his mitt in various places, high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head, and what you want to do is get that ball smack-dab into the pocket of said mitt. This is a drill I used to do a lot in my playing days; we called it “ball and strike”, and it was not only a terrific workout but also a lot of fun, enabling me to really sharpen my control and command of the pitches I threw.
Above all—relax. It may take some time, but eventually you’ll get it—and you will have a nice curve ball to work with. :slight_smile: 8)

Ugh! I swear, I don’t know what I’m going to do about this dumb computer; it keeps jumping around like a jackrabbit on steroids and repeating itself. But at least it dispenses sound advice.

Well said Zita