Curve or Power Curve?

Which do you prefer? Which do you think is more effective??

I prefer the power curve for its reliability and how easily it gets swings and misses.
But what do you think?

Definetly I don’t want that even my ideas messes up anybody so take this just as my two cents since I’m not expert, but in my humble opinion if you can throw both, a power curve and a slow, Zito-ish curve you have the ingredients to make a pretty deadly mix.

If I need to choose only one I’d go with the power curve. It’s more disguiseable (if that’s even a word?) to look like a fast pitch and when it’s too late to see the difference, it dips and bye bye batter.
Slow curves are obviously good because of the huge movement. If you watch Zito or Wells, they get them coming at the batter in a ridiculous angle. It travels more downwards than it does forward. But because batters have a little bit more time to catch the trajectory, I believe that the power curve is more a swing-and-miss pitch and the rainbow curve a slap-it, get-a-crappy-hit pitch.

But imagine mixing those thwo curves effectively.

how do you throw a power curve?

i would imagine you just throw a normal curve but about 10mph faster

I personally like Leo Mazzone’s take on breaking balls (Brave’s pitching coach back in the day over Maddux, Smoltz, Neagle, Glavine)…he basically says: a breaking ball is a breaking ball. So essentially, you want your curveball to just be a breaking ball, and whether or not it is tight or large in break is determined by how much spin is applied to any given pitch. Just work on an effective pitch to get you going, and then worry about 12-6 or power curve. He also notes not trying to have a “nasty” curve, but one that gets outs…that’s what really determines whether or not it is nasty.

Well, you throw curveball, but you throw it as hard as you can. When you throw it right, it can get alot more swings and misses than the standard.

Well, you throw curveball, but you throw it as hard as you can. When you throw it right, it can get alot more swings and misses than the standard.[/quote]

when i do that it only breaks about 1 inch if that, maybe 2" should I try karate chopping the ball? it seems to get like a 2-8 spin though is that good?

A curve is a curve. Some guys have harder curves than others, but they’re all curves. Power curves, yellow hammers, uncle charlies, backdoor curves–all curves.

Well, you throw curveball, but you throw it as hard as you can. When you throw it right, it can get alot more swings and misses than the standard.[/quote]

when i do that it only breaks about 1 inch if that, maybe 2" should I try karate chopping the ball? it seems to get like a 2-8 spin though is that good?[/quote]

You really have to work to get on top of the ball if you want it to break. If you dont, you might as well not even bother with it. Someone is gonna take you deep if you dont get on top.
Without actually seeing you throw it , and how it’s breaking, i can only offer a bit of advice.
1- Like a said b4, get ON TOP of the ball
2- get your elbow up, bcuz the break you described would make me think that your dropping your elbow.
3-Put in some serious time getting the rotation right. You want that ball to come out of your hand with some serious rotation.-----The way i judge it, when i am throwing, or watching someone else throw it, is by whether or not i can clearly see the seams rotating. When i throw it the way i like it, all I can see after releasing it is red with a tinnnny lil bit of white.

Also, Judging by how hard you have to throw it to get it to do what it should (in my opinion that is) i would say that it is going to be more stressful to your elbow that a standard curve. Make sure your actually old enough to throw something like that, we dont want you getting hurt.

Here is how Francisco Rodriguez throws his power curve. This one was a hanger though.